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Comment: Re:if 'twere permanent... (Score 2, Interesting) 599

by RecessionCone (#32178332) Attached to: Ultrasound As a Male Contraceptive
It always strikes me as amusing that religious people who ostensibly don't agree with Darwin end up with lots of kids, while the stereotypical secular humanist strongly believes in evolution but refuses to propagate his or her genes. It's an interesting disconnect between ideology and reality, on both sides.
The Internet

+ - Why the iNewspaper Should Cost $0

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "Back in 1981, Dave Winer recalls, the IBM PC came with a choice of operating systems. CP/M, then the leading OS, cost $450. The very-popular UCSD P-system cost $550. PC-DOS, the brand-new OS created by Microsoft for IBM, cost $40. So which of the three became the default choice of consumers? And since ad dollars seek out the hottest newspaper the same way developers bet on PC-DOS and ignored CP/M and UCSD, Winer argues the best price for a newspaper on the iPad is $0. 'If you can get Steve to bundle your newspaper so that every iPad user gets a free subscription,' advises Dave, 'when you look at yourself in the mirror you'll be looking at one smart and newly rich person!'"
Security

+ - Malware capital of the world is Shaoxing, China->

Submitted by suraj.sun
suraj.sun (1348507) writes "Symantec announced on Monday that Shaoxing, China was malware capital of the world last month. That’s just one of the takeaways in the company’s March 2010 MessageLabs Intelligence Report, an analysis of the origins of targeted attacks and malicious emails used to gain access to sensitive corporate data.

According to Symantec’s research, nearly 30 percent of all malicious attacks came from China — with 21.3 percent from Shaoxing alone. Runner-up to the crown was Taipei, at 16.5 percent, with London taking the bronze at 14.8 percent.

On a national scale, China trumped all, followed by Romania, with 21.1 percent of attempted attacks, and the United States, with 13.8 percent.

Symantec MessageLabs : http://www.messagelabs.com/resources/press/47235

ZDNet : http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=32452"

Link to Original Source
Image

Facebook Leads To Increase In STDs in Britain 270 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the friends-and-really-good-friends dept.
ectotherm writes "According to Professor Peter Kelly, a director of Public Health in Great Britain: 'There has been a four-fold increase in the number of syphilis cases detected, with more young women being affected.' Why the increase? People meeting up for casual sex through Facebook. According to the article, 'Social networking sites are making it easier for people to meet up for casual sex. There is a rise in syphilis because people are having more sexual partners than 20 years ago and often do not use condoms.'"
Education

Study Finds That Video Games Hinder Learning In Young Boys 278

Posted by Soulskill
from the fun-activities-distract-from-studies,-film-at-11 dept.
dcollins writes "Researchers at Denison University in Ohio have shown that giving PlayStations to young boys leads to slower progress in reading and writing skills. Quoting: 'The study is the first controlled trial to look at the effects of playing video games on learning in young boys. That is to say, the findings aren't based on survey data of kids' game habits, but instead on a specific group of children that were randomly assigned to receive a PlayStation or not ... Those with PlayStations also spent less time engaged in educational activities after school and showed less advancement in their reading and writing skills over time than the control group, according to tests taken by the kids. While the game-system owners didn't show significant behavioral problems, their teachers did report delays in learning academic skills, including writing and spelling.'"

Comment: Re:No mention of HTML5? (Score 1) 628

by RecessionCone (#31499204) Attached to: XML Co-Founder Joins Google, Blasts iPhone
Sorry, I should have been more clear in my post. I don't understand why Bray didn't discuss HTML5 when criticizing Apple for its walled-garden app store & control over apps on the iPhone, since web apps completely circumvent all the restrictions that Bray ranted on and on about. When he does bring up HTML5, it's only to acknowledge that he doesn't know much about it, and he never manages to connect the dots.

From the article: "The big thing about the Web isn’t the technology, it’s that it’s the first-ever platform without a vendor" . Somehow he misses that the Web is a big platform on the iPhone, and then goes on to whine about native applications not being as open and free as the web! It's like he totally missed the point of his own tirade: if you don't like vendor controlled platforms, use the Web, it's the first-ever platform without a vendor!

For someone who supposedly thinks deep thoughts about these subjects, he's frighteningly short-sighted.

Comment: No mention of HTML5? (Score 2, Interesting) 628

by RecessionCone (#31491404) Attached to: XML Co-Founder Joins Google, Blasts iPhone
It's funny - Google is the biggest proponent of using the web to deploy applications of any company that I'm aware of. And Apple doesn't manage, censor, or exert a scintilla of control over web applications. In fact, they support them by ensuring the iPhone remains one of the best deployment targets for HTML applications, keeping their browser up-to-date. Accordingly, I would expect Tim Bray to hold the opinion that developing native apps is a relic of the 20th century, destined to die out soon from natural selection, and persuade people to write web apps rather than rant about Apple's outdated and relictual "walled-garden" app store.

I think Tim Bray's rant on the iPhone is rather ill-considered & rather short-sighted.

+ - Why Do We Fear The Headless Dog Robot?-> 1

Submitted by destinyland
destinyland (578448) writes "Whether it's the BigDog military quadruped robot or an anthropomorphic walking robot that sweats, they provoke a common human-robot revulsion. Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori describes it as "the Uncanny Valley," arguing near-lifelike creatures can seem real but unhealthy and even "genetically unfit". "The Uncanny Valley effect is most often evoked by the face," but interestingly enough, the BigDog robot doesn't have a face. In this case its the legs which are so realistic, they create the impression that the robot is alive but still headless and unhealthy."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Power factor? (Score 2, Insightful) 400

by RecessionCone (#30280070) Attached to: Lifecycle Energy Costs of LED, CFL Bulbs Calculated
I wonder if this analysis took into account CFL's poor power factor. Cheap CFLs usually have a power factor of around 0.5, which causes substantial electrical losses compared to Incandescent bulbs, which are purely resistive (and therefore have a power factor of 1.0). LEDs, on the other hand, have a pretty good power factor. http://www.theengineer.co.uk/opinion/led-is-the-answer/299821.article
Portables (Games)

Xbox 360 Laptop Creator Unveils Sleek New Design 46

Posted by Soulskill
from the look-at-the-shiny dept.
A couple years ago we discussed Benjamin Heckendorn's modification which turned the Xbox 360 into a laptop. Now, he's completed a new, revamped design which includes a removable Xbox 360 hard drive, an internal Wi-fi module and a new button layout. It looks a lot nicer, too. He's also posted a description of how he did it.
Power

Harnessing Slow Water Currents For Renewable Energy 113

Posted by Soulskill
from the hydroelectric-for-those-who-won't-give-a-dam dept.
Julie188 writes "Slow-moving ocean and river currents could be a new, reliable and affordable alternative energy source. A University of Michigan engineer, Michael Bernitsas, has made a machine that works like a fish to turn potentially destructive vibrations in fluid flows into clean, renewable power. This is is the first known device that could harness energy from most of the water currents around the globe because it works in flows moving slower than 2 knots (about 2.3 miles per hour). Most of the Earth's currents are slower than 3 knots. Turbines and water mills need an average of 5 or 6 knots to operate efficiently. Further details and a few brief movies of the technology are available, as well as a video explanation by Professor Bernitsas himself."
Enlightenment

+ - Satellite images show Myanmar abuses-> 1

Submitted by
Lucas123
Lucas123 writes "Satellite images that resulted from a year-long study just released by The American Association for the Advancement of Science, human rights campaigners and commercial satellite providers show evidence from above that Burma's military-led government has engaged in a long campaign of destroying villages and relocating villagers. "Human-rights groups say that more than 3,000 villages have been destroyed in an effort to crush opposition to the junta. Civil unrest in Myanmar has created 1.5 million refugees and 500,000 internally displaced people, and 1,300 political prisoners are in jail, according to human-rights reports.""
Link to Original Source

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