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Submission + - The Saga of NiceBooby.Net and NBC's Hilarious Shadow-URL Empire (recaply.com)

Recaply writes: Maybe one night, as you scuttled darkly across the fringes of the internet, you came across a site like CocoaJuggs.net. Or LuvInaBarnyard.org. Maybe even PrisonMate.net. But when you clicked, you were met not with the lurid promises of the URL, but rather by the smiling faces of SNL cast members. Had you discovered a wormhole in the web? Nah. Just another pervy-sounding NBC property.

Submission + - Intel's fastest connector to date uses light to transfer data at 1.6Tbps (recaply.com)

Recaply writes: After more than a decade of research, Intel's new connector that uses light as a speedy way to shuffle data between computers is finally ready to replace slower copper cables.

The MXC optical cables will be first implemented at the rack level and use light and lasers to move data between servers, storage, networking and other computing resources. The cables will transfer data at speeds of up to 1.6Tbps (bits per second), outpacing the throughput on copper cables used for networking in data centers.

What does this mean for the industry?

Submission + - Livr: This social network unlocks features the more drunk you get (recaply.com)

Recaply writes: Meet Livr, a social network for drinking and socialising that promises to be different.

For one thing, it won’t even let you log in until you’ve had a drink and blown into the blood-alcohol analyzer attachment. The higher your reading, the more features that are available for use.

Submission + - The Diving Bell and the Exoskeleton: An Excursion into the Depths

Recaply writes: This article is a really interesting read about deep sea commercial diving. The suits, bells & contraptions used and culminating with a look at their latest invention — the Exosuit.

Deep diving is one of the most preposterous activities in which humans engage. Put it this way: diving below a few hundred feet into the ocean pushes the human body farther outside its natural limits and tolerances than walking in space.

Submission + - The Diving Bell and the Exoskeleton: An Excursion into the Depths

Recaply writes: This article is a really interesting read about deep sea commercial diving. The suits, bells & contraptions used and culminating with a look at their latest invention — the Exosuit.

Deep diving is one of the most preposterous activities in which humans engage. Put it this way: diving below a few hundred feet into the ocean pushes the human body farther outside its natural limits and tolerances than walking in space.

Submission + - Is the Internet watching you Sleep? (recaply.com)

Recaply writes: Unsecured webcams mean that people on the internet can peer into homes across the world. From French nursing homes to Russian shops, they’re all unwittingly streaming live online.

This post features 13 images found via google when looking for live streaming webcams. The last one is just shocking.

Submission + - How scientists plan to farm on Mars (recaply.com)

Recaply writes: In the coming decades, NASA has big plans for Mars, including intentions to blast a fifth rover onto the planet’s surface by 2020 and send a manned mission by 2030. But long before humans step onto Mars’ barren terrain, scientists and researchers from around the world want to understand more about its potential to support human life.

They're especially interested in the possibility of growing plants on Mars, a more efficient process that would partially remove the need to ship expensive freeze-dried rations to the planet. Allowing crops to grow there that produce oxygen and scrub carbon dioxide there would make Mars a more liveable environment...

Submission + - How the web was born: WWW turns 25 (recaply.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It was 25 years ago that the World Wide Web was born: from a plan to organise scientific data written in a nondescript Swiss office, it has grown to become one of the most important creations in human history. We look at how it all started.
Few other inventions have made such an impact on society

Submission + - Boeing's Bird of Prey: A Prototype Jet Worthy of the Klingon Empire (recaply.com)

An anonymous reader writes: From the U-2 Dragon Lady and A-12 Oxcart, to the SR-71 Blackbird and D-12 Ramjet Drone, there's been no shortage of exotic aircraft (and UFO sightings) in the skies over Nevada's Area 51. But among the most extreme examples of bleeding-edge avionic design tested was the otherworldly Boeing Bird of Prey.

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