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Comment: Re:This shouldn't have been such a big deal. (Score 1) 1069 1069

There was a time when businesses could legally discriminate based upon race. Most of us look back on that and see how bigoted it was and are glad we are on the right side of history. Same thing will happen here, it just takes time for some people to see it.
Programming

How Relevant is C in 2014? 641 641

Nerval's Lobster writes: Many programming languages have come and gone since Dennis Ritchie devised C in 1972, and yet C has not only survived three major revisions, but continues to thrive. But aside from this incredible legacy, what keeps C atop the Tiobe Index? The number of jobs available for C programmers is not huge, and many of those also include C++ and Objective-C. On Reddit, the C community, while one of the ten most popular programming communities, is half the size of the C++ group. In a new column, David Bolton argues that C remains extremely relevant due to a number of factors including newer C compiler support, the Internet ("basically driven by C applications"), an immense amount of active software written in C that's still used, and its ease in learning. "Knowing C provides a handy insight into higher-level languages — C++, Objective-C, Perl, Python, Java, PHP, C#, D and Go all have block syntax that's derived from C." Do you agree?

Comment: Re:What's the bigger picture? (Score 1) 528 528

I work in InfoSec and this is spot on. Until a lot of people die the private sector will never take security seriously as a whole. Target, Home Depot, Experian, etc. make good news stories, but they really haven't impacted information security practices.
Biotech

Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone 187 187

Clark Schultz writes The premise behind Jurassic Park just got a bit more real after scientists in South Korea said they are optimistic they can extract enough DNA from the blood of a preserved woolly mammoth to clone the long-extinct mammal. The ice-wrapped woolly mammoth was found last year on an island off of Siberia. The development is being closely watched by the scientific community with opinion sharply divided on the ethics of the project.

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