Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Video games of physical games. (Score 1) 171

by Raumkraut (#48563233) Attached to: Preferred Type of Game?

"Tee" sound like a variant of what I knew as Kabaddi. It had a brief burst of popularity in the playground, as I remember, after UK TV broadcast it for a while in the 90s.
Involved rather too much holding hands for working/middle-class white boys though, I think.

Kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi kabaddi *wheeze*

Comment: Re:Comodo's certificate extortion (Score 1) 237

by Raumkraut (#48504843) Attached to: Firefox 34 Arrives With Video Chat, Yahoo Search As Default

You realise all browsers do that, and for a good reason, right?

Nope. Chrome does it much more elegantly IMO. They show that the site uses SSL, but that it is not secure (there's a red strike through the "https" IIRC).

Self-signed SSL certs actually break part of the point of how SSL certs are used on the web...

You know what breaks SSL even worse? Not using it at all. Yet non-https sites are often indicated to be *more* trustworthy (ie. there's no warning) than a site that uses a self-signed cert.
Self-signed certs don't prevent impersonation of the site, true. But they do prevent passive eavesdropping.
Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

Comment: Re:Fun While It Lasted.... (Score 1) 265

by Raumkraut (#48357767) Attached to: Worrying Aspects of Linux Gaming

The point was to refute the statement:

most Linux users don't like paying for software

Which has been proven false by pretty much every Humble Bundle which included a majority Linux-compatible games, since the very start of Humble Bundles.

revenue from linux users compared to total revenue for the humble indie bundle is only 11%

But the numbers show that those 11% of customers are willing to pay more for the product/s than a large proportion of the other 89%.
If the product is being sold for more than $1, then those who are more willing to spend more are generally more valuable customers - as they will still be in the market for the product at a more expensive price, while the majority of free-loaders and cheap-skates disappear from the product's viable target market.

Comment: Re:popular = compromised (Score 1) 96

by Raumkraut (#48316045) Attached to: EFF Begins a Campaign For Secure and Usable Cryptography

Diversification is the tradeoff between "some people get compromised sometimes" and "everyone gets compromised rarely".

If there is one development team, and one client, then if that client is found to be insecure, the only secure course of action is for everyone to stop using that protocol altogether.
If there are many teams, and many clients, if one client is found to be insecure, people can just switch to a different client and continue on as before.

Comment: Re:Awesome quote (Score 1) 232

I'm not saying comcast is the answer, but government replacing them is not really the cure. At least not the cure unless you want your internet carrying 10 times the load it was designed for and the solution pushed being expanding lanes that only a small portion of people can legally use- or worse yet, have to pay a premium for express travel. Yes, some expansion to existing freeways have been adding toll lanes to an otherwise non toll road.

Not sure if sarcasm, or if completely oblivious to the currently ongoing net(flix) neutrality debate.

Comment: Re:What makes them the judge of these matters? (Score 3, Interesting) 144

by Raumkraut (#48139355) Attached to: Google Rejects 58% of "Right To Be Forgotten" Requests

The data protection laws say, in summary, that companies who process peoples' personal information are responsible for keeping that information accurate and up-to-date, and to discard that information when it is no longer relevant.

The court ruling decided that search results on a person's name constituted personal information about that person. Hence search engine indexes are subject to the fore-mentioned laws.

Comment: Re:Simple set of pipelined utilties! (Score 1) 385

by Raumkraut (#47926447) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

any other complex program that isn't formed from a bunch of small "do one thing well!" utilities

Pipeline intercommunication aside, most large programs of any quality *are* formed from a bunch of small "do one thing well" utilities. They're commonly called "libraries".

Please tear up your Richard Stallman fanclub cards because what little software he's written has mostly been Emacs.

Emacs is *one* thing he's written. Wasn't he responsible for the first versions of pretty much *all* the GNU userspace tools? You know, the ones used by the Linux-using UNIX-philosophy-advocates?

That's not even bringing up the fact that SystemD is.. wait for it... built from a bunch of individual utilities that can actually be used by non-systemd programs.

Oh, great! So we can just install the SystemD init daemon, and not bother with the rest of its feature-creep?

All the simple programs have been written.

Working...