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Comment: Re:Summary is COMPLETELY WRONG (Score 1) 433

by Raul Acevedo (#35744192) Attached to: France Outlaws Hashed Passwords

It is still completely possible for Google to use hashed passwords to authenticate users and only "save" the plain password in a "write only" file (text or separate database) with the unhashed passwords...

That's a distinction without a difference. It is absurd to keep a hash if you are required to keep the plain text. In reality this would mean encrypting the password, but it still comes down to eliminating hashing.

Comment: Re:Why not just block attachments? (Score 1) 178

by Raul Acevedo (#35598370) Attached to: Aussie PM Office Calls For Government Ban On Gmail, Hotmail

How does it decrypt the traffic? It can't; only the parties in the SSL handshaking can do that, and that is the user's browser and the end server with its certificate.

Other posts on this thread detail how this is possible: You work for company X and go to https://bank.com./ Company X creates a Certificate Authority SSL certificate and installs it on all browsers. When you go to https://bank.com/ the proxy intercepts and pretends to be bank.com by generating a new server certificate for bank.com and talking to your browser as if it were bank.com. Since your browser trusts Company X's CA cert, it also trusts the fake cert created by the CA cert.

This is only possible if you are forced to use a browser with that CA cert installed, and the company has a proxy or other software/hardware that can essentially do a Man In The Middle attack.

Comment: Actually, it *was* faulty design (Score 1) 1148

"The warnings were stark and issued repeatedly as far back as 1972: If the cooling systems ever failed at a Mark 1 nuclear reactor, the primary containment vessel surrounding the reactor would probably burst as the fuel rods inside overheated. Dangerous radiation would spew into the environment."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/world/asia/16contain.html?hp

An unprecedented force of nature happened, and now over a hundred thousand lives are at risk.

Comment: Of course not (Score 3, Insightful) 309

by Raul Acevedo (#33914926) Attached to: Can Apps Really Damage a Cellular Network?

If you say it's ok for mobile carriers to restrict apps on cell phones, then you implicitly say it's ok for Comcast to dictate what you can have on your PC.

This is another reason why iOS and Apple's ridiculous idea that they can tell you what you can do with your property is a horrible precedent: it's my device, not yours.

Comment: Re:and... (Score 1) 281

by Raul Acevedo (#33208040) Attached to: Google Secret Privacy Document Leaked

It's not as simple as them just trying to make more money. If they don't respond to the new and emerging threads from rivals, Google could eventually fail. This is part of the reason they extend into so many different areas such as Android. It's not just about making more profit; it's about ensuring long term survival.

"You tweachewous miscweant!" -- Elmer Fudd

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