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Comment: Re:Full Stack? (Score 2) 354

by Ranx (#44125915) Attached to: Node.js and MongoDB Turning JavaScript Into a Full-Stack Language

In the web development world a stack is the combination of webserver, database and programming language, so you have the well known LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) and the Java stack (Tomcat [for example], Oracle [for example] and Java) and the Microsoft stack (Windows, IIS, SQL Server and C#). Now you also have the JavaScript stack (Node.js [with build in webserver] and MongoDB).

Comment: Re:I don't.. (Score 4, Insightful) 453

by Ranx (#42502375) Attached to: Why JavaScript Is the New Perl

The problem is not JavaScript, but programmers who think "it's just a scripting language, how hard can this be". And they hit a brick wall again and again because JavaScript is a language with its own features, features that has to be learnt.

And JavaScript is unmaintanable? It's just a programming language. It's up to the programmer to structure your code. How is that different from other languages? Of course it's possible to write maintainable large projects in JavaScript.

I agree best practices and frameworks are still being developed and improved, but is JavaScript a horrible language? No, it isn't.

Television

Viacom Claims Copyright On Irrlicht Video 258

Posted by kdawson
from the some-kinda-nerve dept.
stinkytoe writes in with the news that Nikolaus Gebhardt, developer of the cross-platform game engine library Irrlicht, recently had one of his video tutorials taken off of YouTube. A thread on Irrlicht's forum contains a copy of the takedown notice. From Gebhardt's blog: "Viacom, the corporation behind MTV, DreamWorks and Paramount is now claiming they own the copyright on a video of an Irrlicht tutorial. Which is completely ridiculous, of course: The whole thing has been written by me and the Irrlicht team, even textures and skins and logos have been created by me, and an Irrlicht Engine user... simply filmed and published it on YouTube.com. Here is a screenshot of the tutorial, it's really just a 2D GUI rendered using the 3D engine, nothing special at all."

The Dark Side of the PlayStation 3 Launch 505

Posted by Zonk
from the nothing-nice-to-say dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Kotaku is running an article prompted by an email from a foreign student in Japan. The reader unveils the sad reality of the modern gaming industry. Japanese businessmen made ample use of homeless people and Chinese nationals to obtain PS3s for re-sale. There was also a large amount of pushing and shoving, some fights, and almost no police presence at the most crowded stores." From the article: "Based on my observations of the first twenty PS3s sold at Bic Camera, they were all purchased by Chinese nationals, none of whom bought any software. After making their purchase, television crews asked for interviews but all were declined. These temporary owners of PS3s would then make their way down the street where their bosses waited. After several minutes, a dozen PS3s were rounded up, as their Japanese business manager paid out cash to those who waited in line for them. I witnessed a homeless-looking Chinese man, in his sixties or seventies get paid 20,000 yen for his services and was then sent away." Update: 11/12 05:40 GMT by Z : You're right. Sony only shares a portion of the blame here. Offsides on my part.

The Ruby Way 81

Posted by samzenpus
from the way-she-goes-boys dept.
Tim Hunter writes "Hal Fulton's The Ruby Way, Second Edition doesn't try to be the only book a Ruby programmer needs. It tries to be a book every serious Ruby programmer needs, and it succeeds. The Ruby Way is a book about programming with Ruby, the object-oriented programming language from Japan. Ruby is free software and runs on Linux, Microsoft Windows, Apple OS X, and other operating systems. It is available for download from its web site, www.ruby-lang.org or its companion site www.rubyforge.org. Read the rest of Tim's review.

How to Prevent Form Spam Without Captchas 272

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the can't-beat-the-curte-power-of-kittenauth dept.
UnderAttack writes "Spam submitted to web contact forms and forums continues to be a huge problem. The standard way out is the use of captchas. However, captchas can be hard to read even for humans. And if implemented wrong, they will be read by the bots. The SANS Internet Storm Center covers a nice set of alternatives to captchas. For example, the use of style sheets to hide certain form fields from humans, but make them 'attractive' to bots. The idea of these methods is to increase the work a spammer has to do to spam the form without inconveniencing regular users."

4 Seconds Loading Time Is Maximum For Websurfers 219

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the longer-than-i-wait dept.
nieske writes "Of course we all want webpages to load as fast as possible, but now research has finally shown it: four seconds loading time is the maximum threshold for websurfers. Akamai and JupiterResearch have conducted a study among 1,000 online shoppers and have found, among other results, that one third of respondents have, at one point, left a shopping website because of the overall 'poor experience.' 75% of them do not intend ever to come back to this website again. Online shopper loyalty also increases as loading time of webpages decreases. Will this study finally show developers of shopping websites the importance of the performance of their websites?"

Adobe and Mozilla Foundation Collaborate on ECMAScript 142

Posted by Zonk
from the shiny-happy-pengins dept.
gemal writes "I just saw a project called Tamarin (AVM2 open source) Flash9_DotReleases_Branch initial revision checked into the Mozilla CVS repository. Shortly afterwards came the following press release: ' Adobe and the Mozilla Foundation today announced that Adobe has contributed source code for the ActionScript Virtual Machine, the powerful standards-based scripting language engine in Adobe Flash Player, to the Mozilla Foundation. Mozilla will host a new open source project, called Tamarin, to accelerate the development of this standards-based approach for creating rich and engaging Web applications. This is a major milestone in bringing together the broader HTML and Flash development communities around a common language, and empowering the creation of even more innovative applications in the Web 2.0 world.' You can read about the Tamarin project on the Mozilla site."

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