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Submission + - Execs of Cogent & Level 3 speak up about net neutrality issues

romiir writes: Executives at Cogent and Level 3 are speaking up publicly about unnecessary internet congestion being caused by certain large ISPs refusing to upgrade congested peering connections.

On CNET: The CEO of Cogent says "Comcast bullied Netflix into an interconnection deal by refusing upgrades to fix congestion, a claim a Comcast executive told Congress was "wholly inaccurate." Full article here

Over at Level 3's blog a couple days earlier Mark Taylor, VP of Content and Media at Level 3 talked about feedback received to Michael Mooney's blog article "Chicken" | A Game Played as a Child and by some ISPs with the Internet. He goes on to explain more in depth the current situation in which some american ISPs have been made aware of congestion issues on their peering connections but refuse to take any action to allow their customers to get the bandwidth they are already paying for. More Here

Interesting that after all of this. Today, Netflix subscribers worldwide are being e-mailed informing them of a $1 increase for all new members so they can "continue to adding more movies and TV shows". The e-mail goes on to thank existing Netflix customers and let them know their plan and price will not change for two years.

Ars Technica just posted an article titled "Netflix comes through with price hike after struggles with Comcast, Verizon"

Submission + - 200-400 Gbps DDoS Attacks Are Now Normal (

An anonymous reader writes: Brian Krebs has a followup to last week's 400 Gbps DDoS attack using NTP amplification. Krebs, as a computer security writer, has often been the target of DDoS attacks, was also hit by a 200Gbps attack recently (apparently, from a 15-year-old in Illinois). That kind of volume would have been record-breaking only a couple years ago, but now it's just normal. Arbor Networks says we're entering the 'hockey stick' era of DDoS attacks, as a graph of attack volume spikes sharply over the past year. CloudFlare's CEO wrote, 'Monday’s DDoS proved these attacks aren’t just theoretical. To generate approximately 400Gbps of traffic, the attacker used 4,529 NTP servers running on 1,298 different networks. On average, each of these servers sent 87Mbps of traffic to the intended victim on CloudFlare’s network. Remarkably, it is possible that the attacker used only a single server running on a network that allowed source IP address spoofing to initiate the requests. An attacker with a 1 Gbps connection can theoretically generate more than 200Gbps of DDoS traffic.' In a statement to Krebs, he added, 'We have an attack of over 100 Gbps almost every hour of every day.'

Submission + - Airlines Face Acute Pilot Shortage 2

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The WSJ reports that US airlines are facing their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with federal mandates taking effect that will require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65. "We are about four years from a solution, but we are only about six months away from a problem.,” says Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp. A study by the University of North Dakota's aviation department indicates major airlines will need to hire 60,000 pilots by 2025 to replace departures and cover expansion over the next eight years. Meanwhile only 36,000 pilots have passed the Air Transport Pilot exam in the past eight years, which all pilots would have to pass under the congressionally imposed rules and there are limits to the ability of airlines, especially the regional carriers, to attract more pilots by raising wages. While the industry's health has improved in recent years, many carriers still operate on thin profit margins, with the airlines sandwiched between rising costs for fuel and unsteady demand from price-sensitive consumers. "It certainly will result in challenges to maintain quality," says John Marshall, an independent aviation-safety consultant who spent 26 years in the Air Force before overseeing Delta's safety. "Regional carriers will be creative and have to take shortcuts" to fill their cockpits."

Submission + - Alere Loses 100,000 Patient's Personal Details, SSNs, Diagnoses (

An anonymous reader writes: The 'health management' company Alere produces and markets in-home medical devices that act as electronic middle-men between doctors and patients taking warfarin (an anti-coagulant drug). Levels of the drug in the blood stream need to be constantly monitored to ensure levels remain within safe ranges, too little and there is a risk of blood clots, too much and hemorrhage can occur. This data is processed by Alere and distributed to qualified health professions who then interpret the results, taking action as required. However, on the 23rd of September, an Alere employee laptop with an unencrypted file containing the health records and personal details of all 100,000 patients being monitored was stolen from a parked car. The company did not become aware of the privacy breach until the 1st of October, and since then affected patients have been notified by mail and have been offered identity theft checks. The OCR has not yet been notified (notification must be made within 60 days), and the neither the laptop nor the data have been recovered. It begs the question, would you trust a 3rd party health provider with your personal information? What if the home test had been for more stigmatised diseases such as HIV antigen levels?

Submission + - Google hit with $200,000 damages bill over Mokbel shots (

niftydude writes: Should Google be held liable for images that appear in its search results? An Australian court has said yes.

A Melbourne man who won a defamation case against search engine giant Google has been awarded $200,000 in damages.

Milorad Trkulja, also known as Michael, sued the multinational over images of him alongside a well-known underworld figure that appeared in its search results.

A six-person Supreme Court jury found last month that Mr Trkulja had been defamed by the images, which he first contacted Google about removing in 2009.


Submission + - Google Outage Shows Risk of Doing Business in China

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The WSJ reports that widespread disruptions to Google in China over the weekend halting use of everything from Google's search engine to its Gmail email service to its Google Play mobile-applications store underscore the uncertainty surrounding Beijing's effort to control the flow of information into the country, as well as the risks that effort poses to the government's efforts to draw global businesses.The source of the disruptions couldn't be determined but Internet experts pointed to China's Internet censorship efforts, which have been ratcheted up ahead of the 18th Party Congress. "There appears to be a throttling under way of Web access," says David Wolf, citing recent articles in foreign media about corruption and wealth in China spurred by the party congress and the fall of former party star Bo Xilai, "that's their primary concern, people getting news either through Google or through its services." Beijing risks a backlash if it were to block Google outright on a long-term basis, says Wolf and such a move could put Beijing in violation of its free-trade commitment under the World Trade Organization and make China a less-attractive place to do business. "If China insists in the medium and long term of creating another Great Firewall between the China cloud and the rest of the world, China will be an increasingly untenable place to do business.""

Submission + - Help OED Find First Reference to 'FAQ' (

northernboy writes: The Oxford English Dictionary needs your help! In order to authoritatively document the history and usage of the English language, the editors are seeking references to the first appearance of the term 'FAQ'. While I really wanted to post their appeal for a reliable reference to the first usage of 'cooties' ( I felt that the Slashdot editors were more likely to post this item if it were in support of the more noble cause of identifying the first usage of FAQ, as we know it (

Surely someone in the Slashdot community has access to a documented first sighti
ng of the term FAQ?

Please dig deep into your archives, and help the editors of the Oxford English D
ictionary today!


Submission + - Sony DVR useless after Rovi stops TV Guide OnScreen (

speedlaw writes: "Rovi has just announced that they are stopping the TV Guide OnScreen service as of April 13th, 2013-this was announced via the service itself. This is an on air listing service that provides listings over the air, as part of an OTA TV signal. Many devices, notably the Sony HDD 250 and 500 Digital Video Recorders, will no longer function without the clock-set data this stream provides. When Microsoft decided to stop supporting Windows 95, they didn't "brick" everyone's system. Worse, Sony never came out with another DVR in the US market. Why do we have to rent them ? How do we get Sony or Rovi to provide at least a software patch to set the clock so the DVR can at least retain 1980's VCR functionality ?
Sony admits no fix. too much information on TV Guide OnScreen.

The TV stations who broadcast the data have been ordered by Rovi to disconnect the data inserters and ship them back. I have a TiVo, and yes, I know all about HTPC, but this data stream was "lifetime listings" like TiVo has "lifetime listings" that Rovi is looking to cut, my two DVR units are about to brick....Slashdotters, help !"

Submission + - Adding forums to a website, what is the best way?

DustyMurray writes: "I am considering adding forums to my website, and am just getting confused by all the options. My first reaction is always DIY. You get better website integration, and it looks and feels 100% how you want it to look and feel. However looking at things like phpBB and Vanilla forums, I will be hard pressed to build a better user experience in a reasonable amount of time. Also these out-of-the-box solutions seem to be shouting "Easy to integrate with your website". So, considering this, how easy are these ready build forums really to integrate in your website. I remember one of my favorite site, going completely blabla when they started to use a generic forum instead. I even stopped going to them after a while... I definitely do not want that for my site.... So I want things like, looks and feels in integral part of the rest of my site. Want to be able to insert stuff on certain pages, so it's not either the forums, or my site... It must be a mix. And I do not want a second login system on my site. And last but not least, I definitely don't want to have this typical generic look that most forums sport, they just reek "out-of-the-box-very-vanilla".... So can all that be delivered with the out-of-the-box forums that exist today? And which one is the most flexible regarding these wishes."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Which virtual machine software for a beginner 3

An anonymous reader writes: I am getting ready to start trying out / learning the use of virtual machines. This is for personal use.

It would be good to run both Windows vms and linux vms. Early use would be maintaining multiple Windows installs using only one desktop computer with plenty of cores and memory. I would be starting with a Windows host, but probably later switching to a linux host after i learn more about linux.

Free is good, but reliability and ease of use are better.

What is the current Slashdot choice for a vm beginner:
vmware, zen, virtual box, etc. ???

Submission + - Collapse of Mayans Associated with Climate Change (

An anonymous reader writes: The collapse of the Mayan civilization within decades after 1000 CE was probably triggered by climate change
in the form of centuries-long droughts that resulted in mass starvation and destruction of the king's ritual authority, according to researchers from Pennsylvania State University attempting to assemble the historical climate record by examining stalagmites in a cave in Belize. While this earlier climate change would have been produced by natural, cyclic causes, the study notes that the effects on the Mayas (a civilization that flourished from c. 2000 BCE to 900 CE) were exacerbated by overpopulation and intensive farming. Lead author Douglas Kennett notes possible parallels with the effects of today's climate change on regions such as Africa and Europe. Meanwhile, Dec 21, 2012 is only a few weeks away.


Submission + - Twitter Survives Election after Ruby-to-Java Move

mc10 writes: As the results of the 2012 US Presidential election were being announced Tuesday night, Twitter experienced record traffic to its website, but the service never faltered despite the increased load – something Twitter engineers credit to the company's move from Ruby to Java for its backend software. Unlike in the past, Twitter did not experience service outages, even as the website generated 874,560 posts in a single minute at its peak in traffic.

Submission + - Buckyballs Throws in the Towell

RenderSeven writes: As previously reported the immensely popular Buckyballs office toys have been targeted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Last week Maxfield and Oberton, the maker of Buckyballs gave up the battle and announced they would discontinue sales and close. However, being driven out of business is not enough for R Buckminster Fuller's estate, who has filed yet another lawsuit that they own all rights to the name "buckyballs" despite widespread use of the term. If you still haven't bought your own yet, a few thousand sets in stock are still available.

Submission + - Hyundai Overstated MPG on Over 1 Million Cars

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Reuters reports that Hyundai and its affiliate Kia Motors conceded that they overstated the fuel economy on more than 1 million recently sold vehicles, and agreed to compensate owners for the additional fuel costs after the EPA found the errors in 13 Kia and Hyundai models from the 2011 to 2013 model years. The findings were a blow to the two carmakers who have centered their marketing campaigns on superior fuel economy. "Given the importance of fuel efficiency for all us, we are extremely sorry for these errors," says John Krafcik, head of Hyundai Motor America. "When we say to Hyundai owners, 'We've got your back,' that's an assurance we don't take lightly." The mileage on most labels will be reduced by 1 to 2 miles per gallon, with the largest adjustment being a 6-mpg highway reduction for one version of the Kia Soul, the EPA said. Hyundai previously touted the fact that many of its models get 40 miles per gallon on the highway. Now three Hyundai models, the Elantra, Accent and Veloster, as well as the Kia Rio fall short of that mark as will the Hyundai Sonata and Kia Optima hybrids. "The fact that the companies' ballyhooed 40 mpg cars are no longer members of that august club...will be something that haunts the companies for a long time to come," says Edmunds car editor John O'Dell."

"I've finally learned what `upward compatible' means. It means we get to keep all our old mistakes." -- Dennie van Tassel