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Comment: Re:So instead of "free" why don't they say "covere (Score 1) 309

Marketing: because "free" and "new" are the two strongest advertising buzz words that drive sales. It doesn't matter that it truly isn't free, rather buried in the cost of the item, consumers are attracted to products that include "free" or "new" somewhere and are more likely to buy.

This is also why "new version" or "new features" or "new colors" or "new enhnacements" are often pitched despite the product being the same old thing with the same old functionality with the same old annoyances.

Comment: Yes please. (Score 1) 381

by RJFerret (#47440007) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: Do You Want a Smart Watch?

If it could replace the need to carry a phone around with me, or have one clipped to my belt, or have a bag to carry it in, etc. It's far nicer to have nothing extra to carry, than to carry around an item.

It would need a replaceable power source that holds a long enough charge so years from now when the battery doesn't have full capacity, it lasts all day and into the night.

It would be nice to have a scalable sized display, perhaps projected if not holographic (there goes that power).

Google Now functionality required, so connectivity, location awareness and microphone please.

Instead of being a watch, be the band, so whatever watch face could be used. Come in a size/style that suits womens watches.

It doesn't need to have a speaker, that could be a separate Bluetooth earring like IBM had 15 years ago, so the entire world doesn't hear/be disturbed, and I don't look like a borg.

One of those virtual keyboard systems that can tell what your fingers are typing in midair from your wrist movements. Acceptable to have a complementary bluetooth bracelet for the other wrist to make this work.

In the future, I'd like a private neural display, so I'd be a 'borg, with an amazing firewall so I don't get mental adverts. At this point we'd hopefully be able to eliminate the secondary bracelet for typing and just think "OK Google".

Comment: What problem are you trying to solve? (Score 1) 143

by RJFerret (#47370953) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Replacing Paper With Tablets For Design Meetings?

our firm is looking to get away from using paper during our design meetings

Why?

What problem are you trying to solve? Without understanding the problem, nobody can provide pros/cons or cost/benefit of alternatives, much less come up with a solution to...?

Once you actually identify the problem, the solution might become self-evident. But just listing your ideas and seeing if others have implemented things similar to your ideas won't resolve the circumstance.

(Meanwhile, perhaps quit and find a job outside of the design field, a field where identifying and clearly communicating problems is key to coming up with designs to resolve said problems. My guess is sales might be a better fit, given the suggestion of throwing hardware at people being a benefit, for no apparent reason.)

Comment: Not necessary (Score 1) 208

by RJFerret (#47281161) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Bequeath Sensitive Information?

I'm surprised only one other person pointed out almost none of that info is needed. Banks, courts, insurance, attorneys, brokers, all of them have procedures which negate passwords/PINS/all that info the executor of the estate typically doesn't know.

What you do want is to get way more copies of the death certificate than you imagine you'll ever need. The death certificate and the institution's forms will gain you legal access to everything. Accessing them improperly could lead to trouble.

(A list with passwords should be outdated in a matter of weeks when passwords are changed anyway, account numbers when accounts are closed/moved, etc. It's just quicker/easier to use the institutions process and doesn't ruffle any feathers.)

Comment: Re:I'm totally for this (Score 1) 243

by RJFerret (#47192561) Attached to: New Car Can Lean Into Curves, Literally

Try an Acura RL with SH-AWD first. The Benz system will obscure a bad road condition, causing you to drive with inaccurate information and potentially overdrive for conditions. The Honda system speeds up the outside wheels, effectively rotating the car à la a row boat, and it feels amazing, like you are accelerating down a straight road while actually sweeping a bend. Instead of the side bolsters pushing into you, the back of the seat pushes you from behind while you are in a turn. However it's not a fictitious feeling, but really works that way.

Comment: What do I think? (Score 4, Insightful) 185

by RJFerret (#47141253) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Taking a New Tack On Net Neutrality?

I think extortion is extortion.

As a landlord, there are other considerations too, depending if your tenants have the option to not pay for your "lack-of-service", or reduce the rent by the amount alternatives cost them, how it is described to them, and the laws of the individual state, it might even negate their legal requirement to pay full rent.

Landlords aren't often permitted to prevent tenants from obtaining services. Courts don't tend to favor entities trying to obstruct students' abilities to obtain learning resources.

Comment: Magazine (Score 1) 153

by RJFerret (#47132851) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Inspired You To Start Hacking?

In the lifestyle sense, my father had tools and fixed things instead of blowing his hard earned savings on paying others to do what anyone could.

In the computer sense, magazines provided basic programs you could manually type in.

In the practical sense, I had a need, I wanted to read late at night but mom would catch me with a flashlight. I used a 12-volt toy train transformer, a 12-volt taillight bulb from a car, wires running to two thumbtacks in the doorframe of my bedroom door to act as a switch, so when mom opened the door the light went off and all I had to do was close to hide the book and pretend to be asleep--was successful for years.

When I becme older, there were free PD programs. Nowadays that there are no magazines, and kids grow up with tablets and expensive apps, I have no clue. (Heck, people were getting in car accidents from heavy key-chains turning off their ignitions instead of simply doing rolling restarts.)

Comment: Re:Bleh (Score 2) 128

by RJFerret (#47130691) Attached to: Ford's Bringing Adaptive Steering To the Masses

I loved it, felt like manual rack and pinion at high speed, felt similar to hydraulic power steering at low speed but far smoother. Humans are dynamic/adaptive creatures, and it doesn't feel any different at different speeds--if you didn't know it was an adaptive electronic system, you'd have no clue. Congrats Ford on catching up to what Honda was doing a decade and half ago.

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (4) How many times do we have to tell you, "No prior art!"

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