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Submission Man Who Found Missing Dr Who Episodes Teases "More To Come"->

BigBadBus writes: In late 2013, Philip Morris announced that he had found 9 missing episodes of 1960s Dr.Who, which completed the 1968 story "Enemy of the World" and most of "The Web of Fear." He has now gone on record to talk about the only episode of these stories that he didn't find — namely part 3 of "Web of Fear" and teases of more episode finds to come.
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Submission U.K. researcher applies for permission to edit embryo genomes->

sciencehabit writes: A researcher in London has applied to the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) for a license to edit the genes of human embryos. Several techniques developed in recent years allow researchers to easily and accurately add, delete, or modify genes in cells. This has stirred debate about using genome editing in ways that would pass the changes on to future generations. The application filed with HFEA would involve only embryos in the lab, however, not any intended to lead to a birth. Many scientists say such lab experiments are crucial to understanding more about early human development, which could lead to new approaches to help infertile couples.
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Comment Late-Breaking News: IT'S HAPPENING! (Score 5, Funny) 261

An emergency session of the Council, something not held in the better part of a yeernak, has just concluded.

K'Breel, Speaker for the Council of Elders, emerged from Council chambers, and addressed the planet thus:

"IT'S HAPPENING!" thundered the Speaker's voice across the frozen plains. "The first blueworlders came in their natural static form, sending stationary representatives to orbit our world and settle onto our plains. You said that if all they could do was remain in high orbit or dig a little trench that was so tiny that any freshly-hatched podling could cover it over in an afternoon, that the obese and sedentary blueworlers were mostly harmless."

"WE TRIED TO WARN YOU, BUT YOU DIDN'T LISTEN! Then came the mobile ones. Brave fighters for the Martian Defense Force have deflected a few of them into deep space, shot others down in fiery blazes of glory, but still the invaders came. Their mechanized terrors evolved rapidly in size and capability with every wave - the first a small short-lived rock-pushing prototype, the second two larger and armed with gelsac-shredding drills, which left a trail of destruction in their wake during yeernaks of struggle, and the latest one descended from a skyhook, powered by Pew-238, and armed with a fully operational photonic weapon system."

"And now - now, after our atmospheric scientists have confirmed the effectiveness of their hundred-yeernak small-scale test on their own world - we have their declaration of intent to use chain reactions of core annihilation to scour the snows and release so much carbdiox that they create a greenhouse effect here - in order to saturate our elegantly-dessicated sands with the toxic and corrosive dihidrox filth that now covers three quarters of their hot, blue, gellhole of a world. THIS IS THE FUTURE YOU CHOSE!"

"BUT YOU CAN STOP IT, PODMATES! All it takes, all it takes, podmates, is an investment in advancing the tribalism of the organic self-replicators that tend to the blueworlders. The Blueworlder Social and Physical Sciences Committee reports that the self-replicators are flawed, critically so, and tend to devolve into tribal groups prone to infighting, primitive displays of aggression, and intertribal warfare. The only flag their mechanized monsters shall raise will be our own red flags, and they will raise our flag over their own world, hoisted by their own proverbial petards. REJOICE, PODMATES! WE SHALL BURY THEM!"

When a junior analyst reminded K'Breel that maybe the real threat was the self-replicators, and that the creatures the Council had spent a full 30% of the planetary budget fighting, were not, in fact, the primary threat -- that their rapid evolution was actually the result of the controlled and directed guidance of thousands of organic minds working in concert -- and that his report, "Organic Blueworlders Determined to Strike in Homeland" had been summarily ignored, K'Breel had the reporter's gelsacs nailed to two small white rectangular posts and promptly incinerated in carbohydrox fires. Slithering back to the Council chambers as the posts smoldered in the background, the Speaker was heard to mutter "As if a small group of thoughtful, committed organics could change the fate of the world for the better or the worse; as if it ever has..."

Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

Different AC here. ... P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think ... menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Although, to be fair to UX "professionals" there is no muscle memory so powerful that it cannot be compromised with sufficient alcohol. Still getting 80wpm tonight. But somehow missed the post-anon button. Sometimes the UX "professional" doesn't have to move the clickbox. It's moving on my system, though!

Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

My touch typist teacher said RIGHT. Never considered the left.

Different AC here. Basic non-ergo Keytronic layout. I use left hand, not right hand, and I was taught touch typing (and can still do 100wpm) by a teacher who taught by the book that says "right-handed."

Even though the "6" is, properly speaking, in the "6/y/h/n" vertical row that "belongs" to the right hand, I just looked closely at my fingers on the actual physical keyboard on which I've typed for 10+ years, and its clones on which I've typed for at least 20+, it's because the "6" is closer to the left index finger than the right index finger. The pad of my hand (not the wrist, about halfway up the pad beneath my pinky finger) rests on the lower edge of my keyboard, and my thumbs rest so comfortably on the spacebar that the spacebar has a little worn spot on it.

Home exercise: Place fingers on home row. Touch right and left index fingers to "T", "Y", and "R". For my fingers and keyboard, "Y" is the most comfortable, almost dead-center. Repeat experiment with "5/6/7". For my fingers/keyboard, I can't reach "5" with right. I can't reach "7" with left, and "6" is reachable with either, but more easily reached with left finger. with left on "T" and right on "y" almost centered beneath "6", left is visually confirmed closer to "6."

(Side note: Both by size of wear spot and by observation while typing this post, I almost exclusively press the space bar with my *right* thumb. Maybe that contributes to using my left idex to hit th 6 key -- my left thumb is basically unused. I just typed this entire sentence with my left thumb crammed under the keyboard and it felt comfortable. Undoable with right thumb in equivalent positon.)

P.S; Our touch-typing teachers taught us the same way, but for me and my keyboard, we cheat on the "6". I've forgotten whether it's supposed to matter which thumb you use on the space bar, although I imagine I could have squeezed out a couple of extra wpm if I'd used both thumbs in high school.

P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think everything has to change every six months for the hell of it, or the last 15 years who think that menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Submission Malvertising ads infest websites with 100++ million visitors->

An anonymous reader writes: Angler exploit's SSL malvertising campaign source and details from MalwareBytes infesting sites like: 121M visits per month 61.8M visits per month 49.9M visits per month 6M visits per month 3.6M visits per month 3.2M visits per month 1.8M visits per month

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Submission Windows 10's Privacy Policy: the New Normal?->

An anonymous reader writes: The launch of Windows 10 brought a lot of users kicking and screaming to the "connected desktop." "This is very useful, but obviously has privacy implications: the online service providers can track which devices are making which requests, which devices are near which Wi-Fi networks, and feasibly might be able to track how devices move around. The service providers will all claim that the data is anonymized, and that no persistent tracking is performed... but it almost certainly could be." There are privacy concerns, particularly for default settings. According to Peter Bright, for better or worse this is the new normal for mainstream operating systems. We're going to have to either get used to it, or get used to fighting with settings to turn it all off. "The days of mainstream operating systems that don't integrate cloud services, that don't exploit machine learning and big data, that don't let developers know which features are used and what problems occur, are behind us, and they're not coming back. This may cost us some amount of privacy, but we'll tend to get something in return: software that can do more things and that works better."
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Submission Def Con: Hacker Shows How to "Kill" Anyone-> 1

wiredmikey writes: Hackers the Def Con gathering in Las Vegas on Friday got schooled in how to be online killers. A rush to go digital with the process of registering deaths has made it simple for maliciously minded folks to have someone who is alive declared dead by the authorities.

"This is a global problem," Australian computer security specialist Chris Rock said as he launched a presentation titled "I Will Kill You."

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Submission No Immunity For Cops Who Sent A SWAT Team To A 68-Year-Old Woman's House->

An anonymous reader writes: Earlier this year, we covered the story of Louise Milan, a 68-year-old grandmother whose house was raided by a SWAT team (accompanied by a news crew) searching for someone who had made alleged threats against police officers over the internet. Part of the probable cause submitted for the warrant was Milan's IP address.

But the police made no attempt to verify whether any resident of Milan's house made the threats and ignored the fact that the IP address was linked to an open WiFi connection.

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Comment Re:Please (Score 1) 371

Its like saying "Hey, Chevrolet, you know your customers like the radio station set to 101.9, why cant you engineer your cars to respect their choice instead of forcing your nefarious 101.5 agenda."

Yeah, but this is a Mozilla car analogy we're talking about here.

In the current 2015.7 model, release, the UX team has decided that a 5-button hamburger menu on an AM dial (and only from 1100Khz to 1150KHz in 10KHz increments) is all that's needed. Users who want to access a wider range of frequencies in the AM band are free to write an extension or purchase a third-party radio head unit.

To further improve the user experience, we remind prospective extension developers that in the Aurora channel for the 2016.1 model year, the about:config setting for frequency.megavskilohertz has been removed, along with the FM antenna. The UX team has made this recommendation based on telemetry that suggests that few drivers actually listen to FM radio, especially since the 2013.6 model, in which the AM/FM toggle switch was removed because the UX team for 2012.1 felt it was cluttering the dashboard.

Submission XKEYSCORE: NSA'S Google for the World's Private Communications->

Advocatus Diaboli writes: "The NSA’s ability to piggyback off of private companies’ tracking of their own users is a vital instrument that allows the agency to trace the data it collects to individual users. It makes no difference if visitors switch to public Wi-Fi networks or connect to VPNs to change their IP addresses: the tracking cookie will follow them around as long as they are using the same web browser and fail to clear their cookies. Apps that run on tablets and smartphones also use analytics services that uniquely track users. Almost every time a user sees an advertisement (in an app or in a web browser), the ad network is tracking users in the same way. A secret GCHQ and CSE program called BADASS, which is similar to XKEYSCORE but with a much narrower scope, mines as much valuable information from leaky smartphone apps as possible, including unique tracking identifiers that app developers use to track their own users."


"Other information gained via XKEYSCORE facilitates the remote exploitation of target computers. By extracting browser fingerprint and operating system versions from Internet traffic, the system allows analysts to quickly assess the exploitability of a target. Brossard, the security researcher, said that “NSA has built an impressively complete set of automated hacking tools for their analysts to use.” Given the breadth of information collected by XKEYSCORE, accessing and exploiting a target’s online activity is a matter of a few mouse clicks. Brossard explains: “The amount of work an analyst has to perform to actually break into remote computers over the Internet seems ridiculously reduced — we are talking minutes, if not seconds. Simple. As easy as typing a few words in Google.”

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Submission Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer-> 11

An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.

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Submission How Silicon Valley got that way -- and why it will continue to rule.->

An anonymous reader writes: Lots of places want to be "the next Silicon Valley." But the Valley's top historian looks back (even talks to Steve Jobs about his respect for the past!) to explain why SV is unique. While there are threats to continued dominance, she thinks its just too hard for another region to challenge SV's supremacy.
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Two is not equal to three, even for large values of two.