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Comment: Re:FreedomBox confusion (Score 1) 206

by Quantumplation (#33627426) Attached to: Security Concerns Paramount After Early Reviews of Diaspora Code
*shrug* I've moved a lot, so been with a variety of ISP's (from the big names like Bell South and Comcast, down to small-timers like RCN Internet here in Boston. I run servers quite frequently (Ventrilo, various games, FTP and web, servers I code, VPN) and have never, ever had them contact me or limit access to those servers. In fact, I wasn't even aware that there were TOS restrictions on running servers. (The internet bill has always been in someone elses name, so I haven't had a chance to read the TOS in detail).

Running a small DHT seed among a large network of federated seeds for your own personal use isn't even so much as a server, as a client in a Peer to Peer architecture.

Comment: Re:Specialized servers offering ad-free accounts (Score 1) 206

by Quantumplation (#33614106) Attached to: Security Concerns Paramount After Early Reviews of Diaspora Code
It's called a Distributed Hash Table. All servers are networked, and data is encrypted (and thus unavailable) and duplicated across your network. Your data may be stored on rogue servers (in order to be accessed while you're offline), but without the right key they cannot decrypt this. "Befriending" someone involves sharing with them some key that allows them to decrypt certain subsets of your data. De-friending them will cause you to "recraft" these keys, and re-encrypt your data, thus preventing them from seeing the data anymore. Obviously if you BEFRIEND someone using a rogue server, they can mine your data. But your data being duplicated across the DHT is no inherent danger to your data. At least, this is how it will work ideally. Likewise, you can run your own seeds.

Comment: Not sure if someone's mentioned this... (Score 1) 563

by Quantumplation (#32966362) Attached to: Passwords That Are Simple — and Safe(?)
because I CBA to read ALL the comments, but wouldn't it seem like the hackers approach would just be as such, then: Try to change your password to a couple of different ones, finding perhaps 3 (or more, depending on the allowed failed attempts) passwords that are locked out, thus guarenteed to have a hit SOMEWHERE. Then, try those three passwords on every email you have in your database. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Comment: Re:Social networks (Score 2, Informative) 295

by Quantumplation (#32182346) Attached to: Creating a Better Facebook
No no, not at all. Do a bit of research on Distributed Hash Tables. They allow a vast storage and distribution of data, without the need for ANY kind of centralized server. If you know one person who's online, you connect and get integrated into the network. You can then cache large numbers (several thousands) of IP's who are online, and sort them by some sort of self published "uptime" statistic. Then, you have a very high probability of being able to connect to the network in the future.

Likewise, a single server that says "Here are a couple people online, go talk to them to connect to the network" is far better than a centralized server that says "Here's all your data, and your friends data. Oh, and I'm giving your data away in large quantities."

Comment: Re:Transparency (Score 0) 545

It's a natural disaster in the same way that the dam bursting after Katrina was a natural disaster. In fact, all natural disasters are a result of man trying to override the safety needs of their environment and live in threatened places. Granted, this one isn't quite on the same flavor as a hurricane hitting a coastal community. It was simply an unexpected event caused by a natural influence (something to do with methane where they were drilling, if I understand correctly). My usage of the term "natural disaster" was a bit misplaced, but you completely missed the point. The point is, people treat the presidency as if things like this are their fault, and ignore the things that are their fault.

Comment: Re:Nah (Score 2, Interesting) 266

by Quantumplation (#32169860) Attached to: Why Google Needs To Pull the Plug On Chrome OS
Except for the complete impossibility of having to deal with viruses. Ever. There literally can be no native stored code, and if somehow the running code does get infected, it's wiped on each reboot. For the user that wants those increase of ease over Android (which are significant when comparing mouse, flash, keyboard, etc) and over Desktops/Laptops (Chrome OS can boot by the time you open your laptop, meaning MUCH longer battery life by just keeping it off), not having to deal with virus's (at least, not without a major paradigm shift in the attackers methods which will happen eventually, but for now it poses a significant difficulty) capitalizes on the same market that Mac went after, but more effectively, as it really IS more difficult to write virus's for the ChromeOS than for a Mac (rather than just being unrealistic due to market share).

Comment: Re:Opinionated Article is Confusing (Score 0) 266

by Quantumplation (#32169564) Attached to: Why Google Needs To Pull the Plug On Chrome OS
An additional point that I thought of while reading the article: He complains about being offline at inconvenient times. Didn't Google make a move, a while back, to push the FCC into "open sourcing" the unowned frequency wavelengths in between the major points on the old national TV broadcast band? The ones that are covered over very long distances by just a few towers, and that go through standard building materials? Isn't it possible the have something planned to make the unavailability of internet a moot point? =P Just my speculation and pseudo-conspiracy theorizing here, though.

Comment: Re:Transparency (Score 0) 545

=P I find it funny that the democratic media in general (note: Trying my best not to make blanket statements, so if you get offended by this post it probably wasn't directed at you.) seemed content to brush the first 8 failed promises under the rug, but then get absolutely outraged that he hasn't done anything about the Oil Spill (a natural disaster he has little control over) despite the fact that he actually has put quite a bit of money into cleaning up this oil spill.

I dislike Obama as much as the next person, but seriously people, get your priorities straight. :)

I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the demigodic party. -- Dennis Ritchie

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