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The Internet

Journal: 10 Reasons Why Your Website Will Never Make A Dime

Journal by markfranks101
http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/making+money+online.html If you've picked up any business magazines within the last year, you've undoubtedly heard the rumors that everyone is getting rich online. Yet, somehow even after you worked so hard to scrape together a website and found some fabulous widget to sell your online venture has yielded little to no money, Why? eBizMBA surveyed over 250 webmasters with sites ranked in the Al
Security

+ - Is this bad advice from an IT manager?

Submitted by e-scetic
e-scetic (1003976) writes "We've secured funding for building a new website to replace our current one. My direct managers, however, not being technically inclined, are seeking input from our Manager of IT. In response, he has set down a number of dictates that he wants us to follow. Here's the part that frightens me most:

  • 4. You should avoid security issues for now and concentrate on multiple user access for maintenance and updates login issues.
  • 5. You must not worry about performance. You need to concentrate on making a workable website first. You must keep it simple.


Some details: I wanted to create a development and production environment, with a development server using version control and pushing stable changes to the live production server. I wanted to isolate the databases to a separate database server, with each web server remote logging to the database server (using syslog-ng). As we'll be generating email newsletters to the tune of 60k emails per issue, I wanted a separate machine for that too (PostFix, most likely). And most importantly, I wanted to spend time early in the project hardening everything — mod_security, mod_evasive, firewalls, intrusion detection, chroot jails, OS lockdown, SSH, etc., the works, before we began development

But the IT Manager is saying to do this:

  • 10. You must design everything on one server for simplicity and design it in such a way to split the application when you need to do so (when it goes on line). I mean your database, your website, and your email server can all be developed on the same simple prototype server hardware.
  • 12. Leave purchasing the actual hardware are for close to the end of the project when it needs to go on line.


I don't believe this is good advice, given we have one year to complete the project I think my route is safest. Can the Slashdot community advise my non-technical managers as to which of us, me or the IT manager, is on the right track? Or Maybe give advice on how to deal with this IT Manager?"

Egotist: A person of low taste, more interested in himself than in me. -- Ambrose Bierce

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