Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Never seen so many allergies in people (Score 1) 79

This is quite humorous! Americans eat raw meat.

Yes, but only beef. Never pork, lamb, goat, horse or any other meats. Certainly not poultry, as the US seems to be able to keep salmonella out of their poultry production. (Which is why Spaghetti Carbonara is almost never made with raw eggs in the US, and don't get me started on the atrocity called egg nogg over here),
And most Americans would never venture past beef, pork, chicken and turkey anyhow. Sometimes fish, if it's breaded thickly enough, fried, and with enough lemon on it that you couldn't tell it from tofu.

Comment Re:Well yeah (Score 4, Insightful) 157

I agree with this.
Winning one-on-one competitions is an individual skill. So is cheating. Following rules is a cooperative or social skill.
As a hunter, cheating is a valuable skill. It doesn't matter whether you catch the game by being better, or by cheating, e.g. with a snare. When you and the other hunter aren't going to share, i.e. it's a competition, what matters is that you win. Preferably every time. If your competitor's family starves, that's a win for your offspring.

If hunting together, the situation becomes different. Team sports may yield different results.

Also - what is the consequence of being caught? I would think that winners of any game that requires thinking would favor those with a rational mind. Who would also be the ones to factor in the cost of getting caught. If that is zero, well, what is the advantage to not cheating?

Comment Re:Not a workstation for me (Score 1) 72

oh it has buttons they are just under the touchpad, and they are god aweful as you have this enormous thin semi flexible plate teetering over two of the shittiest tactile switches ever made, and they dont even put those in a sane place, its where the buttons normally are with shitty printouts on said plate

its horrid to use

Programming

Women Get Pull Requests Accepted More (Except When You Know They're Women) (peerj.com) 274

An anonymous reader writes: In the largest study of gender bias [in programming] to date, researchers found that women tend to have their pull requests accepted at a higher rate than men, across a variety of programming languages. This, despite the finding that their pull requests are larger and less likely to serve an immediate project need. At the same time, when the gender of the women is identifiable (as opposed to hidden), their pull requests are accepted less often than men's.

Comment Re:Reputation and Trust (Score 1) 412

to be fair it was the old asshats who were abusing the customers in this and every other case within the last couple years

now I dont have any doubt the new management has their own "plans", but for the time being its a little harsh to blame them for everything every past fucktard including the original founders of this network have done to mess up the walls around here

Comment Re:Wasn't the C64 just a BASIC interpreter anyways (Score 2) 117

jeesus reading the comments to this question makes me feel old, and also sad that there is such bad information given to the op

yes if you stay away from peeks, pokes, graphics, sound, joystic / paddle io, and the charater set of the C64 they are mostly portable, until they are not cause the methods have different names on different computers depending on if they were keeping compatibility with some pre MS BASIC (such as apple, tandy commie and just about everyone else)

Comment Re:Key Lock (Score 1) 560

My Kia won't let me take the key out of the ignition unless the shifter is in park. You're saying my econobox has more safety features than a luxury Jeep?

Modern cars beyond old-design entry level models tend to not have ignition keys you have to physically insert. Keeping it in the pocket is good enough.

However, they normally won't let you turn the engine off unless you're in park, the exception being tow/car wash mode, where you have to jump through an extra hoop to say that yes, you want to leave it in neutral.

Advertising

Wired To Block Ad-Blocking Users, Offer Subscription (wired.com) 653

AmiMoJo writes: In a blog post Wired has announced that it will begin to block users who block ads on its site: "On an average day, more than 20 percent of the traffic to WIRED.com comes from a reader who is blocking our ads. We know that you come to our site primarily to read our content, but it's important to be clear that advertising is how we keep WIRED going," wrote the editors. The post goes on to offer two options for users blocking ads: whitelist wired.com or subscribe for $1/week.

Slashdot Top Deals

A rolling disk gathers no MOS.

Working...