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Submission + - French weekly fuels Mohammad row with nude cartoons ( 1

PolygamousRanchKid writes: A French magazine ridiculed the Prophet Mohammad on Wednesday by portraying him naked in cartoons, threatening to fuel the anger of Muslims around the world who are already incensed by a film depicting him as a womanizing buffoon. The French government, which had urged the magazine not to print the images, said it was temporarily shutting down premises including embassies and schools in 20 countries on Friday, when protests sometimes break out after Muslim prayers.

"We have the impression that it's officially allowed for Charlie Hebdo to attack the Catholic far-right but we cannot poke fun at fundamental Islamists," Charlie Hebdo editor Stephane Charbonnier, who drew the front-page cartoon, said. "It shows the climate — everyone is driven by fear, and that is exactly what this small handful of extremists who do not represent anyone want — to make everyone afraid, to shut us all in a cave," he told Reuters.


Submission + - YouTube Ban Disrupts Other Google Services in Pakistan (

ryzvonusef writes: The move for banning YouTube in Pakistan over anti-Islam movie on the video website has resulted into sluggish overall internet experience and notably high latency rates for Google Services, mainly on PTCL and EVO networks, ProPakistani users have reported to us.

We are told that almost all Google Services have slowed down or are not available in many cases. Google Search, Blogger, Google Drive, Google Maps, Google Play, Google Docs and other Google services are apparently impacted due to a technical glitch on ISPs’ part.

Google’s Transparency report is also hinting reduced traffic from Pakistan for all Google products, however, due to delayed reporting it is likely that we get a clearer picture from Google by evening.

ISPs aren’t commenting anything on the situation but said that they will look for any abnormalities in services to get them fixed.

A network expert, while commenting on the situation, opined that this delay or inaccessibility of other Google services could be due to cross-site objects that are now blocked because of YouTube ban but are necessary for running other Google services. This includes, and is not limited to, account information services, javascripts, style templates and other similar things that are now a days stored at centralized locations to enhance speeds and user experience.

Users on Chrome Browser are likely to be more exposed to such Google services issues.

A possible solution could be to allow certain file types from YouTube (such as .js, .css and others) while disallowing Video Content through filters that ISPs are using.

Internet users in Pakistan are calling for better filter management from ISPs during the YouTube ban, which is likely to last for at least a week – if not more.


Submission + - Slashdot Gets Acquired as Part of $20 Million Deal ( 1

wiredmikey writes: Dice Holdings (Owner of Job sites including reported this morning that it has acquired Geeknet's online media business, including Slashdot and SourceForge.

"We are very pleased to find a new home for our media business, providing a platform for the sites and our media teams to thrive," said Ken Langone, Chairman of Geeknet. "With this transaction completed, we will now focus our full attention on growing ThinkGeek."

Dice Holdings acquired the business for $20 million in cash. In 2011, the online media properties generated $20 million in Revenues.


Submission + - Warp Drive might be easier to achieve than thought. ( 2

runner_one writes: Harold "Sonny" White of NASA's Johnson Space Center said Friday (Sept. 14) at the 100 Year Starship Symposium that warp drive might be easier to achieve than earlier thought.
The first concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre, however subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy, studies estimated the warp drive would require a minimum amount of energy about equal to the mass-energy of the planet Jupiter. But recent calculations showed that if the shape of the ring encircling the spacecraft was adjusted into more of a rounded donut, as opposed to a flat ring the warp drive could be powered by a mass as small as 500Kg. Furthermore, if the intensity of the space warps can be oscillated over time, the energy required is reduced even more.


Lack of Manpower May Kill VLC For Mac 398

plasmacutter writes "The Video Lan dev team has recently come forward with a notice that the number of active developers for the project's MacOS X releases has dropped to zero, prompting a halt in the release schedule. There is now a disturbing possibility that support for Mac will be dropped as of 1.1.0. As the most versatile and user-friendly solution for bridging the video compatibility gap between OS X and windows, this will be a terrible loss for the Mac community. There is still hope, however, if the right volunteers come forward."

Zombie Pigs First, Hibernating Soldiers Next Screenshot-sm 193

ColdWetDog writes "Wired is running a story on DARPA's effort to stave off battlefield casualties by turning injured soldiers into zombies by injecting them with a cocktail of one chemical or another (details to be announced). From the article, 'Dr. Fossum predicts that each soldier will carry a syringe into combat zones or remote areas, and medic teams will be equipped with several. A single injection will minimize metabolic needs, de-animating injured troops by shutting down brain and heart function. Once treatment can be carried out, they'll be "re-animated" and — hopefully — as good as new.' If it doesn't pan out we can at least get zombie bacon and spam."

Submission + - Australia's Bizarre Classification System for Inte (

stavros-59 writes: Australia's internet censorship watchdog, ACMA uses the current internet classification system, originally intended for children's PC filters. ACMA has now made what must be the most amazing recent decisions of the whole bizarre censorship debate.

The Register today has a story about ACMA's decision to force Apple to withdraw their ITMS gift feature from Australia on the basis that MA+ (over 15 and maybe sex) rated movies could not be given to children using the gift cards. The films are also banned on the internet but not at local video/DVD stores as detailed on this Whirlpool Forum post.

At the same time, the photographic work of Robert Mapplethorpe(not for the fainthearted) has been classified as PG (Parental Guidance) by the Classification Board which is not part of ACMA, but an agency under the Attorney General's Department.


Submission + - Detecting private user data from browsing history (

An anonymous reader writes: I remember reading about the possibility of sniffing Web browsing history some time ago, but I recently came across a website which thoroughly scared me by detecting many sites I visit, even though I had Firefox's NoScript extension enabled. The website uses the old CSS :visited trick to detect Web pages in the browser's history and analyzes the information 'the way the bad guys would do it — by gathering links to answer specific questions about you and grouping them, to give you a taste of what any website can easily learn about you.' The site has different kinds of tests, including detecting bank and government websites, Wikileaks articles, news stories and even adult websites. They even try to detect the visitor's username on social news sites (including Slashdot), as well as zipcodes and search queries typed into forms. The site also gives a lot of technical background, including performance results, and lists possible solutions to the problem.

Submission + - Online attack hits US government Web sites (

angry tapir writes: "A botnet composed of about 50,000 infected computers has been waging a war against U.S. government Web sites and causing headaches for businesses in the U.S. and South Korea. The attack started Saturday, and security experts have credited it with knocking the U.S. Federal Trade Commission's (FTC's) Web site offline for parts of Monday and Tuesday. Several other government Web sites have also been targeted, including the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)."

Submission + - Iranian protestors using TOR, revitalize project ( 1

Death Metal writes: "Iranians seeking to share videos and other eyewitness accounts of the demonstrations that have roiled their country since disputed elections two weeks ago are using an Internet encryption program originally developed by and for the U.S. Navy.

Designed a decade ago to secure Internet communications between U.S. ships at sea, The Onion Router, or TOR, has become one of the most important proxies in Iran for gaining access to Web sites such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook."


Submission + - Google helps catch 'muggers' (

Bifurcati writes: "Two Dutch men have been arrested after a boy they allegedly mugged spotted them in Google StreetView. The 14-year-old boy was pulled off his bicycle in the town of Groningen in September and robbed of his mobile phone and about 250 dollars. He found the pictures in StreetView apparently by chance and while his attackers' faces were blurred (as per Google's rules) Google gave investigators the original unobscured pictures. The bad guys were also apparently twins...or there's some clever real life photoshopping going on!"
Technology (Apple)

Submission + - Steve Jobs had a liver transplant two months ago

evw writes: The Wall Street Journal reports (subscription required, or google the url and click from Google) that Steve Jobs had a liver transplant two months ago. He is on track to return to work at the end of June. William Hawkins, a doctor specializing in pancreatic and gastrointestinal surgery at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., said that the type of slow-growing pancreatic tumor Mr. Jobs had will commonly metastasize in another organ during a patient's lifetime, and that the organ is usually the liver. Having the procedure done in Tennessee makes sense because its list of patients waiting for transplants is shorter than in many other states. There are no residency requirements for transplants. Also in the Mercury News.

Submission + - Military's Earth Threat Information Now Classified 1

scorp1us writes: According to the information collected my military technologies is now classified."For 15 years, scientists have benefited from data gleaned by U.S. classified satellites of natural fireball events in Earth's atmosphere — but no longer. A recent U.S. military policy decision now explicitly states that observations by hush-hush government spacecraft of incoming bodies and fireballs are classified secret and are not to be released, has learned."

Submission + - Documenting a network

Philip writes: "I was appointed as a network manager to a barely functioning MS-based network three years ago. Since then, I've managed to get it up and running — even thriving — but have been guilty of being too busy with the "getting things done" side of networking to document the changes and systems that are put in place. Now I look back, I realise that there is a lot of stuff that I've done and if I get hit by a bus or throw in the towel for any reason I'm leaving behind a network that requires some significant expertise to run and I am worried that I'm the only one that will ever know how it works. Ultimately, this won't be a good reference for me if they are forever trying to work out technical details for years to come. It's likely that I would be replaced with someone with less technical expertise (read "cheaper") and so the document needs to have all sorts of details that outside consultants could understand too (no, I don't want to be the outside consultant either...).

Are there any good templates out there for documenting networks? Has anyone done it before and have some experiences to share? What did you wish your predecessor had written down about a network that you inherited?


"Of course power tools and alcohol don't mix. Everyone knows power tools aren't soluble in alcohol..." -- Crazy Nigel