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Comment Re:Landline is it for me. (Score 1) 257

Well, I'm in the UK, so it's ADSL but basically yes. My ISP will supply a line with no phone number which as you suggest only works for emergency calls (999 or 112 here).

Thinking about it, the various schemes suggested by others for having DECT phones connected to a mobile via Bluetooth are rather clever, but I don't see how it would give me any big advantage over my current arrangement. I'd also need a new mobile as the current one doesn't have Bluetooth. I wouldn't save on line rental as I still need the line for ADSL and the call costs to and from mobiles are higher. A better plan which I have been considering is to go over entirely to VOIP. My ISP will sell me a VOIP service and I already have Asterisk running on my server and connected to my DECT base station which also does SIP. Call costs would be lower than with the landline but the user experience with the DECT phones would stay the same (very important for my better half).

I could even take advantage of my ISPs SIP2SIM service to get a SIM card which links directly to the same system.

Comment Re:Landline is it for me. (Score 1) 257

We have a landline at home and have never thought of getting rid of it. Apart from the fact that it is the medium by which our broadband appears there also seem to be some big conveniences which we couldn't achieve with mobiles (which we also have) but perhaps we are behind the times and there are ways around these limitations with using mobiles instead of a landline.

1) On the land line we have a DECT base station with three handsets scattered around the house. If someone rings then there is a good chance that one of the handsets will be near at hand. If I only had a mobile then I would either have to remember to always carry it with me as I went from room to room (even in my pyjamas) or put up with the fact that it would always ring when I was at the other end of the house and I would have to sprint up or down stairs to answer it. With my advancing years, I neither want to sprint around the house or try to remember to lug my phone from room to room.

2) Often, relatives don't want to phone a particular family member, but rather the family in general. We could I suppose have yet another mobile which was always at home for this purpose, but otherwise callers would have to make a guess about who is in before deciding which mobile to call.

3) The batteries thing again. The DECT phones sit on chargers so they always work. Mobiles go flat quick if left on, but by only switching them on when we go out they need charging less often.

Comment Re:No global deletion (Score 1) 92

Remind me again who is having their free speech silenced by this

Google. And in practice, the people who rely on it to have their content be found (i.e. everyone else).

3. Why does Google have free speech rights that normal companies don't, e.g. credit references can't report things that happened long ago by law, and can't claim free speech allows them to.

Maybe those companies should? The solution to "some idiots excessively weight events that happened 20 years ago" is not censorship of facts, it's to educate people that other people change and that needs to be taken into account.

Comment Re:Subpoenas and the right against self-incriminat (Score 1) 171

It sounds to me like the problem is a flaw in the constitution or the way it's being interpreted, to be honest. The prohibition against incriminating yourself is very obviously there to stop people being tortured until they falsely claim they are guilty. But giving up a password is not a proclamation of guilt or innocence either way. All it can possibly do is yield more evidence, hopefully leading to a more accurate outcome of the case.

I mean, under the same logic, search warrants should be illegal because by letting someone into your house you'd be "self-incriminating". Doesn't work that way.

I think the simplest fix to this problem the FBI has is for courts to stop treating "you must tell us the password" as falling under the self-incrimination clauses. It doesn't make logical sense, would yield a reasonable balance of power (FBI/other agencies cannot do bulk data harvesting from phones, which is the real danger here), puts protection of the device or not under the control of the court, etc. This is the compromise other countries have arrived at and it seems to work OK most of the time.

Comment Re: No problem (Score 1) 666

No it isn't. Absolutely nothing stops ad blockers using heuristics to identify "ad shaped images" or simply having manually written lists of DOM paths to nuke.

I find this whole attitude of "shut up whiners, make your ads EXACTLY meet my unique criteria or else I'll just benefit from your work for free - see if you can stop my nya nya" to be appalling.

Apparently people haven't thought through where this ends. It ends with someone eventually making a non-web content platform that doesn't support ad killers, uses video-game like "anti cheat" techniques and which gets the lions share of the best content because publishers are sick of being ripped off. You know, kind of like how the PC used to be the primary gaming platform in the world and eventually most of the AAA games were coming out on consoles first, and PC maybe or never. Basically, because of piracy and the console makers commitment to fighting it.

Comment Re:Roll-back as in play-back? (Score 2) 72

Banks can roll back transactions for various reasons, e.g. bankruptcy proceedings, mistakes by their own operators or by customers, or ... transactions that are fraudulent. The Metel gang obviously had a sense of irony in exploiting this ability to undo fraudulent transactions to their own benefit.

Submission + - Apple owes $626M in damages after losing huge patent case (ksl.com)

Mr.Intel writes: A jury has ordered Apple to pay $626 million in damages after finding that iMessage, FaceTime and other Apple software infringed on another company's patents. In a case that has been bouncing around the court system since 2012, VirnetX accused Apple of violating four of its patents, which mostly involve methods for real-time communications over the Internet. VirnetX has been labeled a "patent troll" because it is a patent holding company that makes no actual products. It has just 14 employees and rents office space for $5,000 a month. The company makes money by licensing patents to other firms — and by suing businesses that it believes has infringed on its intellectual property.

Submission + - IRS computer problems shut down tax return e-file system (foxnews.com)

Mr.Intel writes: The IRS stopped accepting electronically filed tax returns Wednesday because of problems with some of its computer systems. The outage could affect refunds, but the agency said it doesn't anticipate "major disruptions."

A "hardware failure" forced the shutdown of several tax processing systems, including the e-file system, the IRS said in a statement. The IRS.gov website remains available, but "where's my refund" and other services are not working.

Some systems will be out of service at least until Thursday, the agency said. "The IRS is currently in the process of making repairs and working to restore normal operations as soon as possible," the IRS said.

Submission + - Bill would require IT workers to report child pornography (ksl.com)

Mr.Intel writes: A Utah lawmaker wants computer technicians to face jail time if they don't immediately report child pornography they discover on someone's computer. The proposal would require computer technicians to report child pornography to law enforcement or a federal cyber tip line if they encounter the material, but they would not be required to go searching for it. If they find it and don't report it, they could be given up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

It would mirror laws already on the books in at least 12 other states, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Comment NOBODY WILL EVEN READ THIS (Score 4, Informative) 99

I read the letter. Here's a Cliff's Notes for all you guys who don't read because why evenbother:

Some anonymous devs who are so addicted to github that they probably maintain their grocery list there wrote a letter with a bunch of feature requests. These users re mainly bitching about the fact that users of their own projects don't seem to be able to read or follow instructions. Naturally these people are smart enough and forward thinking enough that they have proposed a perfect solution which requires GitHub to do a shitload of work for free despite the fact that the problems will remain because the users still won't read. A surprising number of other developers clearly can't read or think either and as such signed off on this silliness. Naturally, these well meaning individuals posted all of this to yet another github repo despite the fact that there are many better places and formats to use.

Journalists have picked up the story and have jumped so some pretty wild conclusions, proving beyond the shadow of a doubt that they really can't read either.

Submission + - 'Star Wars: Episode VIII' delayed by seven months (engadget.com)

Mr.Intel writes: You'll have to wait a bit longer to see what the heck is up with Luke Skywalker. Disney announced this afternoon that it's delaying Star Wars: Episode VIII from May 26, 2017 by seven months to December 15, 2017. Disney didn't give any reason for the delay, but sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that it'll allow the studio to give the film a Christmas release treatment, which worked pretty well for The Force Awakens. Additionally, it'll give director/writer Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper) more time to work on the film. THR's Borys Kit notes that may include rewrites to focus more on the new class of Star Wars characters.

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