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Comment: Re:New Microsoft CEO (Score 1) 134

by Princeofcups (#47523669) Attached to: Internet Explorer Vulnerabilities Increase 100%

Microsoft switch IE to use components written by someone else?

I place the likelihood of that as pretty small.

Microsoft have always had a huge case of "Not Invented Here", and I don't see that changing.

Considering that IE is based on Mosaic, SQLServer is based on Sybase, etc. etc., I don't think Microsoft has ever really "invented anything here."

Comment: Re:Packet radio (Score 1) 59

by Princeofcups (#47522545) Attached to: How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster Response

And how, way I ask, does packet radio not accomplish the same thing, across considerably larger distances than a peer-to-peer mesh network? The mesh isn't useless, but at some point it still needs to connect to some place with proper connectivity. This may not be within the range of the Internet of Things.

Because it only works if every device has a pingable IP. Or some such nonsense.

Comment: Re:n/t (Score 2, Insightful) 278

by Princeofcups (#47467611) Attached to: The debate over climate change is..

Newton is a good example. We know for a fact that his 'laws' (or more accurately, models) of motion are wrong. We've known that for a very long time (that is why relativity was needed, Newton's model, for example, failed to predict the orbits of the planets accurately).

That statement is one of the problems. Scientific laws are never right or wrong. That implies an absolute truth. Physics is just looking for math to accurately describe repeatable physical phenomena. Measurement is never absolute, so there is always an implied N decimal points of accuracy. And Newtons laws work 100% in the realm in which the experiments are performed. That's why we call them laws. If you want to set up experiments in other realms, e.g. high speed atomic particles, of course you might need different math to describe it.

Comment: Re:more leisure time for humans! (Score 1) 530

by Princeofcups (#47408551) Attached to: Foxconn Replacing Workers With Robots

Apple doesn't need the money at all, while the poor starve to death. That makes Apple and other companies like Apple the most despicable group of people on Earth. It isn't just Tim Cook or Jeff Bezos or Larry Page. Companies are made by people and every single person working at Apple is contributing to the problem.

Google is bigger than Apple now, so you can throw your hate that way. Or are you just another irrational Apple hater? Rhetorical.

Comment: Re:Sudden outbreak of common sense (Score 1) 276

by Princeofcups (#47311077) Attached to: Federal Judge Rules US No-fly List Violates Constitution

The U.S. Constitution, as designed, granted powers from the people to the government. The compromise found within the Bill of Rights essentially listed a number of prohibitions so the new government absolutely knew that they could in no way interfere with this core set of rights.

Unfortunately, we've reached a point where many people believe that the U.S. Constitution confers rights from the government to the citizens rather than it's original purpose of conferring powers to the government from the people.

And this gets modded up I guess because that's what we'd like it to be. No the Bill or Rights are just that, rights that people have in the US. Nothing, be it person, corporation, government, or church can take these rights away from you. It has NOTHING to do with limiting the powers of the Federal government. This is just a cleverly disguised states rights post, or something. I knew there was something underhanded going on when you snuck that "right to bear arms" in there and forgetting about the militia bit.

Comment: Sports (Score 2) 538

by Princeofcups (#47291495) Attached to: Teaching College Is No Longer a Middle Class Job

Sports. That is all there really is to it. The idiocracy of America values sports infinitely higher than academics. University of Chicago, one of the schools with the least emphasis on sports, has 81% full time instructors, the majority tenure or on the tenure track, and a student to teacher ratio of 6:1. Yes it's expensive to go there, but at least you know where the money is going. It's not paying $5 million a year for a name football coach.

Comment: Re:This is what happens (Score 3, Interesting) 101

This is what happens when you have a single point of failure like a stupid, technically illiterate secretary added to the mix.

Misogyny much? Secretaries are usually well versed in things like email, since it's a major part of their job. Managers are the ones who think they know everything, and make these kinds of mistakes.

Comment: Re:Sexism (Score 3, Interesting) 435

by Princeofcups (#47262843) Attached to: Yahoo's Diversity Record Is Almost As Bad As Google's

Men, particularly blue collar men, have been disproportionately impacted by the bad economy. Where is the same level of enthusiasm about training blue collar men for an "exciting career as a nurse, nurse practitioner, etc.?" Those are high paying, skilled, wildly disproportionately female-dominated positions. They could easily accommodate an influx of men. There is also a true shortage of qualified people, unlike in computer-related fields. Why no interest? Because if we suddenly gave men the opportunity and incentive (ex aggressive recruiting, preferential college admission, etc. ) to pursue those fields, a lot of women might be pushed out and that'd be "sexist."

No, because men in general do not want to be caretakers. Do you want to spend the rest of your life changing bed pans? I thought not. Women take these positions because they were taught to do so, instead of pursuing more lucrative medical technician or heaven forbid MD positions. I have several female friends and relatives who are MDs, and they will tell you about the obstacles put in their way since they weren't white males.

"If truth is beauty, how come no one has their hair done in the library?" -- Lily Tomlin

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