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Submission + - Reznor at it again

yerktoader writes: Trent Reznor and NIN have released another album under Creative Commons, entitled "The Slip". It's free as in speech and beer, as the album has NO cost and I have seen no notice of a physical copy for purchase. The offered formats are high quality MP3, FLAC or M4A lossless, and 24/96 WAV. It's also available streaming at So far I'm at track 4 and I'm diggin' this a whole lot more than Year Zero; Mr. Reznor seems to be back in full swing creatively.

Submission + - How Microsoft dropped the ball with developers ( 1

cremou writes: As part of a series on how Microsoft bungled the transition from XP to Vista, Ars Technica looks at some unfortunate decisions Microsoft made that have made Windows an unpleasant development platform. 'So Windows is just a disaster to write programs for. It's miserable. It's quite nice if you want to use the same techniques you learned 15 years ago and not bother to change how you do, well, anything, but for anyone else it's all pain... And it's not just third parties who suffer. It causes trouble for Microsoft, too. The code isn't just inconsistent and ugly on the outside; it's that way on the inside, too. There's a lot of software for Windows, a lot of business-critical software, that's not maintained any more. And that software is usually buggy. It passes bad parameters to API calls, uses memory that it has released, assumes that files live in particular hardcoded locations, all sorts of things that it shouldn't do.'

Submission + - Bloggers who risked all to reveal Junta in Burma 2

An anonymous reader writes: Internet geeks share a common style, and Ko Latt and his four friends would not be out of place in cyber cafés across the world. They have the skinny arms and the long hair, the dark T-shirts and the jokey nicknames. But few such figures have ever taken the risks that they have in the past few weeks, or achieved so much in a noble and dangerous cause. Since last month Ko Latt, 28, his friends Arca, Eye, Sun and Superman, and scores of others like them have been the third pillar of Burma's Saffron Revolution.

Submission + - Radiohead allows fans to decide on price 2

radicalskeptic writes: "Radiohead, a band known to be unhappy with other music download services, has decided to release their next album, "In Rainbows", in two formats: a £40 boxed set and a digital download. What's the catch? Customers who purchase the digital download are able to name their own price for the album. This is the first Radiohead release since their contract with EMI expired. As "The Majors" continue to lose relevance, can we expect more of this type of experimentation and flexibility from independent artists?"

Submission + - Apple launches iPod Touch, revamps Nano, iTMS wifi (

tRSS writes: "Apple just right now launched iPod touch, with similar interface as the iPhone and new iPod nano with video and coverflow. iPod touch start from $299 whereas iPod nano start from $149. They have also revamped the iPod shuffle with new bright colors. Apple has added the capability of buying and downloading music wirelessly from the iTunes Music store on iPod touch and iPhones now as well."

Submission + - Gehrig's Discovery Sparks Hope (

Raver32 writes: "Hunched over her microscope at the University of Toronto, Janice Robertson is focused on innocuous-looking brown blobs. She's been hunting for life-saving clues into the mystery of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the muscle-destroying killer known as Lou Gehrig's disease. It has perplexed researchers for nearly 140 years and it is a mystery that has captivated Robertson as she watches the microscopic round cells — motor neurons in minuscule sections of human spinal cord and brain. In ALS, these motor neurons are killed by mutant genes that make defective proteins, she explains, causing paralysis and death usually within five years. Named for the New York Yankees player killed by the disease in 1941, Lou Gehrig's has also laid waste to physicist Stephen Hawking and claimed the lives of Sesame Street director Jon Stone, jazz legend Charlie Mingus, actor David Niven, composer Dimitri Shostakovich, and Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong. Effective treatment and a cure do not exist. But Robertson and a Toronto team of scientists have developed the world's first antibody to the abnormal protein derived from the mutant superoxide-dimutase-1 (SOD1) gene, the only known cause of Lou Gehrig's, and responsible for 2 per cent of all cases. This antibody could be used to detect and remove the abnormal forms of the protein. The scientists say their findings, published in the June edition of Nature Medicine, open the door to ways for better treatments, prevention and earlier diagnosis."

The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you've got it made. -- Jean Giraudoux