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Submission + - Anonymous publishes personal information of Wall Street CEO's (

Presto Vivace writes: "

Declaring “the guilty must pay,” Anonymous has released 4.6 gigabytes of data detailing the personal information of Wall Street CEOs and other high level Wall Street executives.

Links to the data began appearing via Twitter on March 2. AnonymousIRC, a popular Twitter account associated with the international hacktivist collective known as Anonymous, tweeted the following:4.6GB .xml files on CEOs and Directors [Compressed to 520mb zip] #Anonymous #OWS #OpWallStreet #BofA #Bloomberg

Between Too Big To Fail banksters and online vigilantes, we are not going to have any law in this country."


Submission + - NIST asks for help in building cybersecurity framework (

Presto Vivace writes: "NIST to build cybersecurity framework, with your help

The Cybersecurity Framework will be a set of voluntary standards and best practices to guide industry in reducing cyber risks to the networks and computers that support critical infrastructure vital to the nation's economy, security and daily life, according to the NIST announcement published in the Federal Register .

The first meeting will be held April 3 at NIST headquarters in Gaithersburg, Md. Registration information is available here.

If you have concerns about cybersecuirty or privacy, I urge you to participate in these discussions."


Submission + - Privacy advocate protests smart meters (

Presto Vivace writes: "Mom takes on smart meters over privacy, health concerns

"This is unreasonable search and seizure," said Stahl, 40, who believes the devices designed to monitor power usage are intrusive and pose a health risk. "It definitely is not OK for my utility ... to know when I'm home and not home."

In addition to the privacy concerns, there is the question of security. As a reader a Reddit put it, "Nothing like adding thousands of entry points into the utilities network. What could possibly go wrong?"


Submission + - Tin Foil Chic (

Presto Vivace writes: "What does the fashionable privacy advocate wear in a total surveillance society? Artist Adam Harvey discusses his line of counter-surveillance fashion with Wired. From the pictures it mostly looks like hoodies. But choice of fabric plays a big role in counter-surveillance fashion.

Harvey: Stealth Wear started as an experiment using the fabrics I was researching for the OFF Pocket. I did research on thermal surveillance and was very interested in where it was going and at some point realized that metalised fabrics work as a shield against thermal imagining cameras. I was able to get access to a thermal camera and started testing swatches of fabric. When I realized that it worked well enough, I got in touch with my friend Johanna Bloomfield and she came up with the hoodie design. Everything was pretty much still an experiment at this point. Then we showed the hoodie to Andrew Green from PRIMITIVE. He loved it and decided to include it and make it a major part of this upcoming show. Originally this show was to be based on work from CV Dazzle and a few other counter surveillance art projects. This whole idea of stealth wear line was very emergent.



Submission + - NIST issues a Request for Information concerning the Cybersecurity Framework (

Presto Vivace writes: "NIST has issued a RIF for Cybersecurity Framework(PDF), which will soon be published in the Federal Register. The Information Technology Laboratory of NIST has created a web site for Cybersecurity Framework.

Clearly, much depends upon how this is implemented. I would encourage all those who are interested to participate in the process. Now is the time to speak out, before the Executive Order is implemented."


Submission + - Requiring backdoors to enable surveillance on all sorts of systems (

Presto Vivace writes: "How The FBI's Desire To Wiretap Every New Technology Makes Us Less Safe

But they're forgetting something: the FBI isn't necessarily the only one who will get access to those backdoors. In fact, by requiring backdoors to enable surveillance on all sorts of systems, the FBI is almost guaranteeing that the bad guys will use those backdoors for their own nefarious purposes. It's not security, it's anti-security.

I often think that lack of privacy is itself a security vultnerability."


Submission + - Students protest biometric scanner move (

Presto Vivace writes: "Newcastle University students protest biometric scanner move

UNIVERSITY students may have to scan their fingerprints in future — to prove they are not bunking off lectures. ... ... Newcastle Free Education Network has organised protests against the plans, claiming the scanners would "'turn universities into border checkpoints" and "reduce university to the attendance of lectures alone".



Submission + - Big brother on the bus (

Presto Vivace writes: "Public Buses Across Country Quietly Adding Microphones to Record Passenger Conversations

Transit authorities in cities across the country are quietly installing microphone-enabled surveillance systems on public buses that would give them the ability to record and store private conversations, according to documents obtained by a news outlet.

I wonder how much money government, state, local, and federal, could save by respecting our rights under the fourth and ninth amendments?"


Submission + - Obamacare: the coming privacy nightmare (

Presto Vivace writes: "Obamacare will be privacy nightmare

By mid-December, the federal government is planning to quietly enact what could be the largest consolidation of personal data in the history of the republic. If you think identity theft is a problem now, wait until Uncle Sam serves up critical information on 300 million American citizens on a platter.

There is a better way to provide healthcare."


Submission + - Verizon and the next level of Stalker Marketing (

Presto Vivace writes: "Verizon Patent Helps Deliver Relevant Ads By Eavesdropping Conversations

Verizon's technology can work a variety of ways. For starters, it can listen in on conversations — whether it be with someone else in the room or on the phone — and pick out keywords that would aide it in its duties. In reality, it's simple stuff in this day and age, but that doesn't make it any less off-putting. Imagine arguing with your significant other and then seeing marriage counseling ads on the TV — or better, cuddling and then seeing ads for contraceptives!

So what are they going to call their product? LavrentiyBeriaSys? Really, News of the World phone hacking looks mild by comparison."


Submission + - That was fast, Leahy scuttles his warrantless e-mail surveillance bill (

Presto Vivace writes: "Under the right conditions, online activism can be very effective. Leahy scuttles his warrantless e-mail surveillance bill

Sen. Patrick Leahy has abandoned his controversial proposal that would grant government agencies more surveillance power — including warrantless access to Americans' e-mail accounts — than they possess under current law.



Submission + - Bionic Mannequins Spy on Shoppers (

Presto Vivace writes: "Bionic Mannequins Spy on Shoppers to Boost Luxury Sales

Retailers are introducing the EyeSee, sold by Italian mannequin maker Almax SpA, to glean data on customers much as online merchants are able to do. The 4,000-euro ($5,072) device has spurred shops to adjust window displays, store layouts and promotions to keep consumers walking in the door and spending.



Submission + - Data miners scraping away our privacy (

Presto Vivace writes: "Twig, writing for Corrente reports on data scrapers. They are not looking for passwords and such; scrapers are looking at blogs and forums searching for material relevant to their corporate clients. We are assured that the information is “anonymized” to protect the identities of forum participants. However, a new tool, PeekYou permits users to connect online names with real world identities. No worries though, if you have a week to spare, you can opt-out of some of the larger data banks."

Submission + - Google and Facebook are pro-privacy. Really! (

Presto Vivace writes:

Privacy and free expression on the internet are not mutually exclusive, a panel of social media experts said at the inaugural Northern Virginia Technology Council (NVTC) Social Media Committee event held at the Tower Club in Tysons Corner, Virginia on December 1. Addressing a crowd of about 75 people, Pablo Chavez, managing policy counsel for Google, said user trust is a top priority for the company.

So, what do Slashdotters make of this?


Submission + - Smart Grid could pose threat to privacy (

Presto Vivace writes: Brian Kreps of the Washington Post reports on a study jointly released Tuesday by the Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner and the Future of Privacy Forum. It seems that in the process of collecting all that feedback about energy use utility companies will inevitably collect a great deal of information about us.

"Instead of measuring energy use at the end of each billing period, smart meters will provide this information at much shorter intervals," the report notes. "Even if electricity use is not recorded minute by minute, or at the appliance level, information may be gleaned from ongoing monitoring of electricity consumption such as the approximate number of occupants, when they are present, as well as when they are awake or asleep. For many, this will resonate as a 'sanctity of the home' issue, where such intimate details of daily life should not be accessible."

Anyone at Slashdot have any ideas for a possible solution?

"Love your country but never trust its government." -- from a hand-painted road sign in central Pennsylvania