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+ - Omand Warns Of 'Ethically Worse' Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Submitted by Press2ToContinue
Press2ToContinue (2424598) writes "In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: "One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work." According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. "You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before." That's remarkable for its implied threat: if you don't let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we're going to start breaking into your homes."

+ - Why We Still Can't Really Put Anything In The Public Domain

Submitted by Press2ToContinue
Press2ToContinue (2424598) writes "While you can make a public domain dedication or (more recently) use the Creative Commons CC0 tool to do so, there's no clear way within the law to actually declare something in the public domain. Instead, the public domain declarations are really more of a promise not to make use of the exclusionary rights provided under copyright.

On the "public domain day" of Copyright Week, Public Knowledge has pointed out that it's time that it became much easier to put things into the public domain. Specifically, the PK post highlights that thanks to the way copyright termination works, even someone who puts their works into the public domain could pull them back out of the public domain after 35 years."

+ - Fish Found Living Half A Mile Under Antarctic Ice

Submitted by BarbaraHudson
BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "Researchers were startled to find fish, crustaceans and jellyfish investigating a submersible camera after drilling through nearly 2,500 feet (740 meters) of Antarctic ice.

The swimmers are in one of the world's most extreme ecosystems, hidden beneath the Ross Ice Shelf, roughly 530 miles (850 kilometers) from the open ocean. "This is the closest we can get to something like Europa," said Slawek Tulaczyk, a glaciologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz and a chief scientist on the drilling project.

More pictures here."

+ - New Study Questions Low-Salt Diet Benefits

Submitted by BarbaraHudson
BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "From the i-wish-they-would-make-up-their-minds dept.

A new study adds more fuel to the debate over restricting sodium levels for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and reducing mortality. "We didn't find any benefit," lead investigator Dr Andreas Kalogeropoulos (Emory University, Atlanta, GA) said of lowering sodium levels to less than 1500 mg per day, "but having said that, we did not find any harm either."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends a maximum daily sodium intake of 2300 mg for the general population and 1500 mg for individuals 51 years of age and older. The American Heart Association (AHA), also support reducing dietary sodium levels but are even more aggressive in their targets, recommending all individuals aim for, at most, 1500 mg of sodium daily.

This isn't the first study to question those recommendations. In 2013, these aggressive targets were challenged when the Institute of Medicine (IOM) conducted a comprehensive review of the literature and concluded there was simply no evidence to recommend lowering sodium to levels in federal dietary guidelines. The IOM even stated the evidence wasn't strong enough to recommend lowering daily sodium intake to the 1500- to 2300-mg/day range.

The AHA responds , other experts weigh in."

+ - Americans Support Mandatory Labeling of Food That Contains DNA

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Jennifer Abel writes at the LA times that according to a recent survey over 80% of Americans says they support “mandatory labels on foods containing DNA,” roughly the same number that support the mandatory labeling of GMO foods “produced with genetic engineering.” Ilya Somin, writing about the survey at the Washington Post, suggested that a mandatory label for foods containing DNA might sound like this: "WARNING: This product contains deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The Surgeon General has determined that DNA is linked to a variety of diseases in both animals and humans. In some configurations, it is a risk factor for cancer and heart disease. Pregnant women are at very high risk of passing on DNA to their children."

The report echoes a well-known joke/prank wherein people discuss the dangers of the chemical “dihydrogen monoxide" also known as hydrogen oxide and hydrogen hydroxide. Search online for information about dihydrogen monoxide, and you'll find a long list of scary-sounding and absolutely true warnings about it: the nuclear power industry uses enormous quantities of it every year. Dihydrogen monoxide is used in the production of many highly toxic pesticides, and chemical weapons banned by the Geneva Conventions. Dihydrogen monoxide is found in all tumors removed from cancer patients, and is guaranteed fatal to humans in large quantities and even small quantities can kill you, if it enters your respiratory system. In 2006, in Louisville, Kentucky, David Karem, executive director of the Waterfront Development Corporation, a public body that operates Waterfront Park, wished to deter bathers from using a large public fountain. "Counting on a lack of understanding about water's chemical makeup," he arranged for signs reading: "DANGER! – WATER CONTAINS HIGH LEVELS OF HYDROGEN – KEEP OUT" to be posted on the fountain at public expense"

+ - King Tut's Mask Damaged; Beard Snapped Off During Cleaning

Submitted by Press2ToContinue
Press2ToContinue (2424598) writes "One of the most priceless treasures in archaeology, the gold funerary mask of King Tutankhamun, was damaged during a cleaning attempt at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Efforts to repair the problem were also botched, according to reports.

The mask's beard snapped off during an attempt to clean the mask in October. Museum staff stuck it back on using epoxy, which leaked onto the face of the mask and dried. Then, the mask was scratched when the workers scraped off the epoxy, according to Al Araby Al Jadeed, a London-based Arabic news site."

+ - iPhone seeks wi-fi connection when "off" 5

Submitted by rbarrphd
rbarrphd (1142349) writes "Recently, my university email account became locked every few hours due to repeated incorrect network login attempts. The culprit was my iPhone 5 trying to connect to the school’s wi-fi with an old password---even though its wi-fi Setting was “Off.” Therefore, iPhones must surreptitiously and repeatedly attempt connection to nearby networks even when that function is supposedly disabled. Is this well-known? Does anyone have another explanation?"

+ - The end of Public Domain 1

Submitted by eporue
eporue (886151) writes "Since I uploaded the public domain movie The night of the living dead to YouTube I got 18 different complaints of copyright infrigment on it.
Actually, I have a channel of Public Domain movies in which monetization has been disabled "due to repeated community guidelines and/or copyright issues".
The problem is that 99% of the complaints are false, they are from companies that have no rights over the movies but by issuing millions of take downs, manage to control a good number of videos in YouTube.
Is there any way to fight back ? Is there a way to "probe" public domain ?"

+ - This Battery Has Lasted 175 Years and No One Knows How->

Submitted by sarahnaomi
sarahnaomi (3948215) writes "There sits, in the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University, a bell that has been ringing, nonstop, for at least 175 years. It's powered by a single battery that was installed in 1840. Researchers would love to know what the battery is made of, but they are afraid that opening the bell would ruin an experiment to see how long it will last.

The bell’s clapper oscillates back and forth constantly and quickly, meaning the Oxford Electric Bell, as it’s called, has rung roughly 10 billion times, according to the university. It's made of what's called a "dry pile," which is one of the first electric batteries. Dry piles were invented by a guy named Giuseppe Zamboni (no relation to the ice resurfacing company) in the early 1800s. They use alternating discs of silver, zinc, sulfur, and other materials to generate low currents of electricity."

Link to Original Source

+ - BitFury Seeks to Alter Bitcoin Mining Economics With Immersion Cooling->

Submitted by 1sockchuck
1sockchuck (826398) writes "One of Bitcoin’s biggest players is turning to immersion cooling to address the shifting economics of cryptocurrency mining. BitFury Group will acquire immersion cooling specialist Allied Control, which created a high-density bitcoin mine in a Hong Kong skyscraper. The mining chips will be immersed in a cooling fluid that boils at a low temperature. As the chips generate heat, the fluid boils off, removing the heat as it changes from liquid to gas. It allows ASICs to operate without fans, which are typically among the largest components of a bitcoin mining rig. BitFury will house its new ASICs immersion tanks in Allied Control's DataTank containers, which can be deployed near sources of cheap power or renewable energy."
Link to Original Source

+ - Tracking Down How Many (Or How Few) People Actively Use Google+

Submitted by BarbaraHudson
BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "Business Insider is reporting that almost nobody is publicly active on Google+ From his 2015 analysis particularly, Morbius covers hundreds of Google+ profiles in detail. "We've got a grand spanking total of 24 profiles out of 7,875 whose 2015 post activity isn't YouTube comments but Google+ posts. That a 0.3% rate of all profile pages, going back to our 2.2 billion profiles. No wonder Dave Besbris (Google+ boss) doesn't want to talk about numbers,"

For those interested in duplicating this, both the methodology and the scripts used can be found here."

+ - Nanobots Deliver Medical Payload in Living Creature for the First Time->

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Researchers working at the University of California, San Diego have claimed a world first in proving that artificial, microscopic machines can travel inside a living creature and deliver their medicinal load without any detrimental effects. Using micro-motor powered nanobots propelled by gas bubbles made from a reaction with the contents of the stomach in which they were deposited, these miniature machines have been successfully deployed in the body of a live mouse."
Link to Original Source

+ - Japanese Nobel laureate blasts his country's treatment of inventors->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The Japanese Nobel winner who helped invent blue LEDs, then abandoned Japan for the U.S. because his country's culture and patent law did not favor him as an inventor, has blasted Japan in an interview for considering further legislation that would do more harm to inventors.

In the early 2000s, Nakamura had a falling out with his employer and, it seemed, all of Japan. Relying on a clause in Japan's patent law, article 35, that assigns patents to individual inventors, he took the unprecedented step of suing his former employer for a share of the profits his invention was generating. He eventually agreed to a court-mediated $8 million settlement, moved to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and became an American citizen. During this period he bitterly complained about Japan's treatment of inventors, the country's educational system and its legal procedures.

..."Before my lawsuit, [Nakamura said] the typical compensation fee [to inventors for assigning patents rights] was a special bonus of about $10,000. But after my litigation, all companies changed [their approach]. The best companies pay a few percent of the royalties or licensing fee [to the inventors]. One big pharmaceutical company pays $10 million or $20 million. The problem is now the Japanese government wants to eliminate patent law article 35 and give all patent rights to the company. If the Japanese government changes the patent law it means basically there would no compensation [for inventors]. In that case I recommend that Japanese employees go abroad."

There is a similar problem with copyright law in the U.S., where changes in the law in the 1970s and 1990s has made it almost impossible for copyrights to ever expire. The changes favor the corporations rather than the individual who might actually create the work."
Link to Original Source

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