Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Why... (Score 1) 166

by Ponyegg (#34877380) Attached to: Goodbye Bifocals — Electronic Glasses Change Focus
re: close up work. We used to make specs for some Harley St surgeons years ago... I say we we would usually send them to Zeiss in Germany. Anyway, they would have their normal single vision glasses inserted with a magnfying scope. eg; http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/5180286/2/istockphoto_5180286-surgeon-with-magnifying-glasses.jpg Not very practical for day-to-day wear though :-) Or alternatively you need trifocals but they offer limited field of vision.

Comment: Re:Perfect for (Score 1) 166

by Ponyegg (#34877250) Attached to: Goodbye Bifocals — Electronic Glasses Change Focus

When volume is ramped up, these could easily become less expensive than bifocals; after all, there's only one grinding operation per lens instead of two.

Common misconception, nowadays there's only one grinding process when you make bifocals. Bifocal lens blanks come to an opticians with the front of the lens already finished to a set/known curvature/power. The lens 'surfacing' equipment simply cuts/polishes the rear of the lens to the required shape to produce the require powered lens as prescribed by the optician, the finished lens is then 'glazed' into the spectacle frame as a normal lens would be. Lens blanks are incredibly cheap already... seriously... markups can be immense (in the mid 90's we were paying £10 for a pair of Nikon NL80 lenses which retailed for >£200)... the difference between the cost of single vision vs bifocals is about 2 to 1 (depending on power and material).

Comment: Re:Perfect for (Score 1) 166

by Ponyegg (#34877128) Attached to: Goodbye Bifocals — Electronic Glasses Change Focus

They could put in a rangefinder that automatically chose the correct magnification based on what's in front of your head. If there was an in FOV "aiming dot" (a la HUD) you could aim the range finder at your object of interest.

What would happen if you're driving a car, Would the windscreen get in the way?

Comment: Re:How do you switch? (Score 1) 166

by Ponyegg (#34877068) Attached to: Goodbye Bifocals — Electronic Glasses Change Focus
It will depend upon how much the refractive index can be altered by and how much the focal point of the lens can be moved to correct the prism. Fundamentally a 'prismed' spectacle lens is simply an 'off center' lens that is physically moving the image on the retina left/right/up/down to compensate for the eye's own lens. If you've got a 'huge' amount of prism then I doubt his will be able to resolve it. If they could somehow create a lens using this technology that acts like a Fresnel prism does then they might be on to something.

Comment: Re:How do you switch? (Score 1) 166

by Ponyegg (#34876938) Attached to: Goodbye Bifocals — Electronic Glasses Change Focus

[disclosure - I used to make spectacles for a living before the internet] You may have different types of progressive lenses. there are numerous manufacturers of them out there and the progressive bifocal area differs across most of them. if you are finding it too narrow then your optician should be able to prescribe a different pair.

Executive bifocals (these basically look like split lenses with the entire lower portion of the lens being the 'reading' area) might well suit those of you with multiple monitor setups as it would cover the lower field of vision. Speak to your Dispensing Optician and explain your needs and they should be able to easily prescribe the right lenses for you.... if they can't then go to another Opticians

Comment: Re:Stores are often named for what they sell (Score 1) 425

by Ponyegg (#34846184) Attached to: Microsoft Fights Apple Trademark On 'App Store'

Just three or four years ago nobody had ever called a software program an "app". That term is new and unique to the iPhone. Software was sold as "software", "programs", and sometimes "software applications", but I had never heard the term "app" before the iPhone.

Sorry but you're wrong there. As has been pointed out before, 'app' has been used as an abbreviation in the Warez/BBS/FXP scene for many years and then latterly has been adopted by the likes of Google & Apple. If you have never heard of this abbreviation before then I can only assume that you are young and are relatively new to the world of computers or associated tech-scenes.

Go read the old marketing for the Blackberry, for Windows CE, for Palm. None of them use the term "app". Just because the iPhone has such a dominant marketing position the term "app" has come to mean cell phone software.

You're probably right (I haven't checked), but then using slang/abbreviations in formal marketing literature is a bit of a no-no. Apple simply cottoned onto to their users being a bit more accepting of such abbreviations in everyday speak, it does not mean they 'invented' the word.

Micro"SOFT" sells software. It's not MicroApp, is it? Apple made a cute catchy term for it's programs. Let Microsoft try to do the same. I'm sure Microsoft marketing can come up with something catchy, like "There's an executable for that".

Putting aside that I don;t really understand your differentiation of 'app' and 'software' Apple didn't make, invent or create anything new in the use of this word, they have simply seized upon the terms use in the wider community in an attempt to build on their tech credentials by using a commonly and frequently used abbreviation. Arguably Google were using the word 'apps' before the 2007 introduction of the iphone or the 2008 introduction of the App Store. Google were referring to to 'Google Apps For Your Domain' in Aug 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Apps). Here's some more uses of it in the wild:

  • appstore.com - owned by Salesforce.com since 2005 (originally registered sometime in 1998) until they sold it to Apple Inc in March 2009
  • myapps.com - seems to have been created 1999
  • myappstore.com - first created 2005

And that's with just 5mins searching. We can categorically show that Apple neither invented or created this phrase. Arguably they may well have popularised tit, but that's no reason for them to be able to trademark it.

Comment: Re:Sowat? (Score 1) 116

by Ponyegg (#34791106) Attached to: BBC Astronomer Misses Meteor During Live Show
I'm glad this topic cropped up as I was watching that episode and immediately thought.... hang on... wasn't that a meteor? But as no-one else on the show picked up on it I though that it was either plane on camera, or a local issue to me, a floater in my eye or some other less exotic answer. Nice to know my initial thoughts were correct. Personally I'm thoroughly enjoying this series, I think some of the US astronomers over in Hawaii that they cut to frequently (and even the live telephone conversation with the Space Station on Wednesday) are a bit perplexed (and somewhat envious) that this would command prime-time viewing in the UK...

Comment: Re:The damage is already done (Score 1) 813

by Ponyegg (#34788990) Attached to: Famous British Autism Study an 'Elaborate Fraud'
Ah, many thanks, I was trying to find the publish date (the DM is particularly bad at this at times), not too sure how I got yesterdays date, thanks for the clarification. The post I quoted though is not a fabrication, they still posted it, I simply got my dates wrong because the DM failed to display a publish date on that particular article.

"The way of the world is to praise dead saints and prosecute live ones." -- Nathaniel Howe

Working...