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Submission + - Website Violates Open Source Licensing Agreement (

PoliTech writes:

The latest indication of the haphazard way in which was developed is the uncredited use of a copyrighted web script for a data function used by the site, a violation of the licensing agreement for the software.

The script in question is called DataTables, a very long and complex piece of website software used for formatting and presenting data. DataTables was developed by a British company called SpryMedia which licenses the open-source software freely to anyone who complies with the licensing agreement.

... a cursory comparison of the two scripts removes any doubt that the source for the script used at is indeed the SpryMedia script. The version even retained easily identifiable comments by the script's author ...


Submission + - Was Megaupload Targeted Because Of Its Upcoming Me (

PoliTech writes: "Matt Burns at TechCrunch voices his suspicions that Megaupload may have been taken down because it was preparing to launch Megabox, a service that would have competed directly and legally with the RIAA record companies.

[Kim] Dotcom described Megabox as Megaupload’s iTunes competitor, which would even eventually offer free premium movies via Megamovie, a site set to launch in 2012. This service would take Megaupload from being just a digital locker site to a full-fledged player in the digital content game.

Will Collier opines that

Copyright protection is a legitimate problem in the digital age, but if the speculation here turns out to be accurate, the Justice Department has been used to facilitate the crib death of a legal competitor to the RIAA. If that pans out, we've got a much bigger problem than piracy to worry about.


Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982