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Comment: Textbook material in France (Score 1) 169

by PoissonPilote (#33121344) Attached to: Sun Founders' Push For Open Source Education
In France, where I received most of my undergrad education in CS, each teacher writes his own course outline, reference material, practicals, etc. (we call them "polycopiés") and it is distributed to every student at the beginning of the term (costs for printing are included in our (low) tuition). Sometimes the teachers recommend that we read a couple books, but everything that we strictly need for the course is in these "polycopiés". They are often shared by teachers within the departments, who update it every year. It's pretty much what happens in every university/field there. Why doesn't the US do that?
Security

+ - Security for open source web projects-> 1

Submitted by PoissonPilote
PoissonPilote (1274002) writes "I'm currently developing a multi-player browser based game, using the good old HTML, Javascript, PHP & MySQL. Progress is good so far, and my number of players is slowly but steadily increasing.
At the beginning of the project, I decided to put the entirety of my game under the MIT licence, so that anyone could study the code or even start their own server for the game.
However, with the increasing popularity of my project, I am starting to worry about security issues. Even though I consider myself decent at web development and am pretty sure I'm not making any classic mistakes (SQL injection, cross-site scripting, URL forgery, etc.) I am no web security expert. I didn't find any relevant examples to compare my game to, as most open source games are written in a compiled language, and no web server is at stake in those cases. Some web developers friends told me not to release the source code at all, others told me to release it only when the game will be shut down- naturally I'm not satisfied by either of these solutions.

What approach does Slashdot recommend ?"

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