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Comment: Re:So DON'T GIVE CHASE (Score 4, Informative) 302

In Australia the doctrine is Police do not give chase, EVER! If the suspect's car starts speeding, they have strict protocols in place to back off, radio in the situation and follow from a safe distance

Studies have shown that chasing only escalates the danger to property and the public. So the correct response, is to radio in for support and do everything to protect life and property. They can't really outrun a radio.

There was a recent, going back a few years now, chase that took five days from when they first attempted to stop a car, to the actual capture. There were gaps, but police had photos, videos, registration plates and descriptions of the suspects. They knew it was only a matter of time before the suspects would be caught.

And guess what, not a single shot was fired

Comment: Re:Incoming international flights (Score 1) 683

by Platinumrat (#47403263) Attached to: TSA Prohibits Taking Discharged Electronic Devices Onto Planes
So what happens when you do power up your laptop, for example. Do they then want you to login? I've I don't happen to have my Company PKI card on my body, but I'm carrying my company laptop, then good luck getting in. I know it's an unlikely scenario, but sometimes the brain cells aren't firing properly and you just dump shit into checked luggage, when you're rushing to catch the 6am International flight.

Comment: Re:The real plot problem (Score 1) 169

by Platinumrat (#46850873) Attached to: Why Should Game Stories Make Sense?
I agree. Plot isn't everything. EVE online, for example has absolutely no plot. There's some missions, which are very repetative, but then it's all about PvP in a massive sandbox. What this means is that the people are the plot. An unfortunate side-effect of that, is that most "people" are dicks, so there's a lot of ganking that goes on.

Comment: Re:If only it were possible to do challenge/respon (Score 3, Informative) 178

But what kind of person is going to research all the information needed to fly and operate a drone safely. Mostly, they'll buy the cheapest unit that the retailer sells them.

The fact that he crashed it, is likely to put him into trouble, especially since he was using it for commercial purposes. In Australia, a license is required to operate a UAV commercially, with adequate certification of the pilots.

From the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).

1. It's Illegal to fly Remotely Piloted Aircraft for money or economic reasons...

2. You must not fly closer than 30 meters to vehicles, boats, buildings or people

3. FPV flying is illegal without an Advanced Amateur Radio License

....

I guess he's in a lot of trouble.

Comment: Re:Buy a Galileo Scope (Score 1) 52

by Platinumrat (#46274253) Attached to: Online Database Allows Scientists To Recreate Early Telescopes
I have a $5000 rig (120mm ED refractor and EQ5-Synscan system) + another 150mm Dobsonian. The Galileo Scope is recommended by professional Astronomers and Science educators as a good quality starter telescope. Bang-for-buck it's a great buy. You get to see the same crappy optics Galileo used + some decent modern optics. You can pull it apart and put it back together. What more do you want.

Comment: Catching up to Australia (Score 4, Informative) 457

by Platinumrat (#46166461) Attached to: Judge Says You Can Warn Others About Speed Traps
About 10 years ago, or it could have been longer, we had a similar case in Australia. The driver in question argued that he was just informing other drivers to drive safely. The magistrate agreed with the argument and the charges were dropped. Suffice it to say, the police were mightily annoyed, but there is nothing they can do about it now.

Comment: Re:Don't they have an fiber to the node cable netw (Score 1) 229

by Platinumrat (#45615575) Attached to: Australia's $44B Broadband Network May Settle For Fiber Near the Home

Good for you. However, you're not in the majority. In reality, what you have depends on your suburb. All the new developments (ie. in the last 10 years) are serviced by Satelite for Pay-TV and DSL for Internet. It's only the really new developments (last 2 years) that have fibre.

Everyone in my suburb has a DSLproblem. The DSLAMs in most areas are full and Telstra won't upgrade. Mine is about 5km away (as the crow flies), so give it about 7km of crappy copper. Every time it rains, I lose my internet and VoIP, but Telstra don't care, as my service is not through them.

Comment: Re:Personally (Score 4, Insightful) 655

I couldn't disagree with you more. That isn't problem solving. That's management.

What you describe is a manager's view of problem solving. They basically don't want problems in the first place. It is a manger's role to ensure succession planning, training, resourcing and appropriation documentation and standards are maintained. A manager doesn't have to do them all. Just create the environment through appropriate "stick & carrot" measures.

Problem solving is a rare gift. I know many competent Design Engineers that cannot solve problems. Most good ones can follow patterns and apply them to new situations. They're the ones you want to do most day to day designs. They'll need attention to detail. But again, they'll get stuck at something that doesn't fit within the those patterns.

The true problem solver is one that can make those intuitive leaps. They can see patterns, where others don't. Or even work with a thousand disconnected clues to get to the root cause. The very best do have a formal background (and they'll draw on those bits of lectures and notes when needed, going back to 1st Principals). Unfortunately, this is difficult and mostly can't be put down in Manuals and Procedures. This doesn't necessarily make them appropriate for Design and quite often they are terrible at mundane tasks. So bad managers don't know how to value or deal with this skill.

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