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Comment: Reminds me of the Adult online market (Score 1) 115

by PktLoss (#46963289) Attached to: How Free-To-Play Is Constricting Mobile Games

I used to work for a very large player in the adult online space, video content and the like.

Their research showed that customers who signed up had a window, measured in weeks, in which they'd blow a bunch of cash, then stop. This is why if you do sign up for an adult site you'll see their content, and ads for content from other sites (some they own, some their competitors). The links to competitors surprised me, but it makes sense. There's a very high Cost-Per-Action (CPA) in that space, and the window to get that user to spend money is closing, so any opportunity is worth looking into. You make less money sending them to your competitors, anything > 0.

 

Comment: Doesn't solve fundamental problem (Score 1) 273

by PktLoss (#46660979) Attached to: Algorithm Challenge: Burning Man Vehicle Exodus

The fundamental problem seems to be the bottleneck of cars getting onto the highway. By creating a priority lane you'll be reducing the number of cars/minute that are able to leave via the regular lane. Additionally there will likely be some switching inefficiencies introduced with the new lane merge.

So some cars will get out faster, other cars will get out slower (as the non-priority cars wait for the priority cars to pass them and leave), I think we'll see average car wait time increase here. The extra labour used to manage entrance to the express lane could probably be better spent on highway flagging or looking to optimize the highway merge for more vehicles/minute.

Comment: Security Breaches (Score 2) 171

by PktLoss (#45807811) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Getting an Uncooperative Website To Delete One's Account?

I'm often interested in deleting accounts I don't use to avoid handing over my data to attackers when their systems are breached. The more sites I've given my data to, the more likely some random attack that grabs a DB dump is to have a copy of my Name, Email, (hashed)? password, etc. Depending on the type of site it may even get some bonus data in the form of answers to security questions.

This sounds lame, but the amount of spam currently directed at the accounts I used on: the motley fool, eharmony, Adobe, is quite high. Just putting my name at the top makes it that much more likely I'll be scammed by some phishing email.

Comment: Re:use wifi (Score 4, Informative) 250

by PktLoss (#45584629) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Recommendations For Beautiful Network Cable Trays?

Wifi is.. nice, but I wouldn't use it in a full office environment for everyday access. It's a big brick room, lots of computers, lots of interference. Not only is WiFi slower, but you end up with less throughput as interference requires random packets to be retransmitted.

Comment: Buy plain, decorate (Score 5, Interesting) 250

by PktLoss (#45584607) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Recommendations For Beautiful Network Cable Trays?

I might not bother trying to find beautiful trays, but instead find regular ones, then decorate!

Take something like this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003AU3HG6?ie=UTF8&camp=213733&creative=393185&creativeASIN=B003AU3HG6&linkCode=shr&tag=preinheimerco-20&qid=1386087250&sr=8-5&keywords=wire+tray

Then put these underneath: http://www.whatisblik.com/shop/explore?theme=77

Turn your office ceiling into a pacman arena!

Biotech

Give Your Child the Gift of an Alzheimer's Diagnosis 198

Posted by Soulskill
from the at-least-it's-not-a-cell-phone dept.
theodp writes "'There's a lot you can do for your child with 99 dollars,' explains Fast Company's Elizabeth Murphy, who opted to get her adopted 5-year-old daughter's genes tested by 23andMe, a startup founded by Anne Wojcicki that's been funded to the tune of $126 million by Google, Sergey Brin (Wojcicki's now-separated spouse), Yuri Milner, and others. So, how'd that work out? 'My daughter,' writes Murphy, 'who is learning to read and tie her shoes, has two copies of the APOE-4 variant, the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's. According to her 23andMe results, she has a 55% chance of contracting the disease between the ages of 65 and 79.' So, what is 23andMe's advice for the worried Mom? 'You have this potential now to engage her in all kinds of activities,' said Wojcicki. 'Do you get her focused on her exercise and what she's eating, and doing brain games and more math?' Duke associate professor of public policy Don Taylor had more comforting advice for Murphy. 'It's possible the best thing you can do is burn that damn report and never think of it again,' he said. 'I'm just talking now as a parent. Do not wreck yourself about your 5-year-old getting Alzheimer's. Worry more about the fact that when she's a teenager she might be driving around in cars with drunk boys.'"

Comment: Re:Look past the article's version of the cast ... (Score 5, Interesting) 181

by PktLoss (#45068723) Attached to: New York Subpoenaed AirBnb For All NYC User Data

I very much think the city can have an issue on its own, without the hotel lobby being involved.

Property owners are learning that they can make more money posting their apartments on AirBnB than renting them out traditionally. It's in their economic best interest to hire a cleaning service, throw in some flat-pack furniture, and stop renting normally. This distorts the rental market as people who live in the city end up competing with short-term tourists for places to live. Cities want to be somewhere people live, not just somewhere people visit.

AirBnB hosts also compete against hotels with a stacked deck. They're not forced to charge the standard hotel-night taxes, nor meet ID checking requirements on guests, pay commercial property tax, meet commercial firecode requirements, etc. I can understand why hotels would be angry, but they're far from the only group with a vested interest in the outcome.

Comment: Re:Nobody is Banning Tesla (Score 4, Insightful) 688

by PktLoss (#44812531) Attached to: How Car Dealership Lobbyists Successfully Banned Tesla Motors From Texas

I understand the basis of the franchise laws as they exist to be: Car companies needed to expand in the old days, but lacked the capitol. Franchisees bought the rights to sell cars from a given company, put their name on the door, and started selling Ford, GM, whatever. Once the car companies themselves were in better shape (with cash kicking around) it would have been trivial for them to open their own dealership down the road, then either stop selling cars to the franchisee, or undercut their prices, etc. etc. Without those laws it would have been easy, and economically beneficial, for the car companies to kill their dealer network and replace it with corporate stores once they had the money to do so.

No franchisee has given money to Telsa to start selling their cars, so there's no one who needs those protections.

Comment: Problems? (Score 1) 119

So, this presents some challenges to me.

I'm one of the co-founders of WonderProxy (https://wonderproxy.com), running a global proxy network you might imagine that we have a fair large log set. Our billing process involves pulling those logs into a central location, parsing out the information billing cares about (customer & amount transferred) and recording that in aggregate. We store the raw log files in the raw form for some period of time to comply with any sort of warrant from law enforcement (our goal isn't to be an anonymous proxy), then delete them.

We've deliberately avoided storing the details we have about traffic in any sort of a searchable form. We don't care unless something comes up, and as a general rule we don't think it's any of our business. So this is information about a customer we do possess, but also information that we've deliberately avoided making easy to access. To grab it we'd eschew all our UI tools, drop to a command line, and start uncompromising raw logs, then dropping in with grep or something to filter the user. Then another manual pass to make sure we haven't accidentally included a line from a different customer. For a customer who has only paid us $15 we're going to lose money once we comply.

Then there's our webserver logs. If someone logged in, we can technically deduce what requests are associated with that user, but the apache logs don't store that in a nice easy to read format. We'd probably need to correlate a bunch of different systems in ways we've never done before (because we don't care who loaded main.css on Tuesday the 4th at 16:22:32) to ensure we've handed everything over.

This is of course assuming that we're required to comply. We're a Canadian corporation, federally registered, all that fun stuff. But we do have servers in the US, even ones in California. Of course, getting an answer from our lawyer on whether or not we're required to comply would also cost well more than $15, and that's before we've started trying.

Then there's more privileged information. Internally calculated fraud scores, internal customer notes ("these people never pay on time", "serious PITA, don't give a discount", "Super nice") which is also information we have on a customer, but generally something we'd rather not share.

As a user of the web, I like this idea. As a provider of services the cost of compliance scares me.

This is a good time to punt work.

Working...