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Comment Re:Punishing people who get degrees we need the mo (Score 1) 206

I'd like to see the people with the most money who also claim that there is a "shortage" to offer to pay the tuition for X number of STEM classes so that students could take them for FREE.

Even if they only start with the 100 level math courses.

Would more people end up taking Calc 3? Maybe. Maybe not. If they do, good. If they do not, then the cost won't be a problem.

Switch the focus from getting-money-from-students to getting-more-STEM-students.

Comment Re:The most fundamental problem is not the cost.. (Score 1) 335

That is why the British government discovered that it couldn't build nuclear power stations on the land previously used for coal-fired power stations. It was (far) too radioactive, due to the coal ash that had accumulated. A graphic illustration of the different standards applied to nuclear power, because it's scary. Coal has killed many, many more people but who could be afraid of a lump of plain old black coal? Dirty, yes. Scary, no.

Comment Depends if you want to support it (Score 4, Informative) 312

That really is the big issue with a self build: If something goes wrong, you have to track it down and handle all the support. If you get a pre-built from a good vendor, they'll handle it all. Say what you want about Dell, but all you have to do is run their diags (baked in to the UEFI) and call them with the code, they'll send a dude with the parts needed.

So that should be the major thing you think about. If you don't want to do support, then buy it from a vendor that will provide you with support to the level you require. I tend to recommend Dell because their hardware is reasonable and they have support available everywhere. They subcontract it, but it all works well. We use it at work all the time.

If you are willing to do support yourself, then building it gets you precisely what you want. I build my system at home because I have very exacting requirements for what I'm after and nobody has that kind of thing for sale. Like I don't want a "good large power supply", I want a Seasonic Platinum 1000, nothing else.

Also you'll find that generally at the higher end of things you save money building a system. For more consumer/office range stuff it usually is a wash: They build the mass market systems around as cheap as you could afford to. However when you start talking higher end gaming stuff, you can pay a large premium for things.

As an example I just built a system for a good friend of mine. He wanted some very, very high end hardware and pretty specific requirements. Origin PC would get him what he wanted... for about $9,000. I put it together for around $6,000. The gamer stuff often commands a hefty premium.

Comment Re:Book misses major points (Score 0) 153

I don't think she sufficiently covered the HOW which is the problem.

They don't fund a charter school and see how the students there do.

They fund political campaigns to move money FROM the existing system TO their system.

When their system does not support their projections, they leave it. BUT THEY DO NOT PAY TO HAVE THE LAW REVERSED.

So the end result is a worse public school system.

Comment Re: he should know better (Score 1) 316

The First Amendment to the ...


It is sad and sickening to see so called liberals ...

Also correct.

BUT ... it does not matter. In the end it is up to the business whether it will run X or not.

By way of example: if I paid you $10 to put a sign on your lawn saying X would it be wrong for you to refuse to put a sign saying Y on your lawn for $10?

And that's where we are at with this. The theatres refuse all religious / political ads. That way they do not endorse X or Y. Nor can they be seen as supporting Y.

Comment Just another example of useless insurance (Score 1) 100

How much do you think Cox has been paying their insurer? How long has Cox been paying their insurer?

Now when they need it, the insurer gives them the big middle finger.

Just goes to show what a scam insurance is. You pay, and pay, and pay, and pay, all for nothing.

Cox would have been better off keeping the money they paid for insurance. At lest then they would have gotten some use from it.

Comment Headline misses a key detail. (Score 4, Informative) 100

The Slashdot headline missed a key detail covered in the article:

Beazley point out that the piracy lawsuit was filed November last year, several days before the December 1, 2014 date the insurance policy began.

It is a bit difficult to file an insurance claim against lawsuit costs when the lawsuit was instigated before the insurance took effect.

Since we love automobile analogies so much: It is like buying car insurance in December to insure against a crash that took place the month before. That's not going to help much.

Or buying a life insurance policy for your recently-deceased relative.

The date insurance coverage began is going to be a far bigger problem than details of what the policy covers.

Comment Re:Yes! (Score 3, Informative) 754

I switched to a Mac in 2012 for my personal shit and about 6 months ago went to a Mac for work too. With the release of Office 2016 for the Mac, I honestly cannot find a single thing I cannot do comfortably on my Mac anymore.

If you have a serious problem with it, Parallels has been running Windows apps for me better than any native PC installation since version 7 back in 2012.

I mean, I know you're probably trolling or trying to be funny, but it's a dead joke in 2015.

Comment Re:I'll believe it when I see it (Score 1) 50

And yet for all your misdirected Windows whining DirectX for Windows is the only area that AMD cards perform well. Their Linux drivers blow, as noted by other posts here, and that is because AMD can't write OpenGL drivers to save their life.

nVidia, on the other hand, has extremely fast and solid drivers for Linux.

Comment Re:Fair warning (Score 4, Funny) 493

Hey look buddy, I'm an Engineer. That means I solve problems.
Not problems like 'what is beauty?' Because that would fall
within the purview of your conundrums of philosophy. I solve
practical problems. For instance, how am I gonna stop some
big mean motherhubbard from tearin' me a structurally
superfluous new behind? The answer? Use a gun. And if that
don' work, use MORE gun. Like this heavy caliber tripod-
mounted little ol' number designed by me... Built by me...
And you best hope...not pointed at YOU.

Comment Well of course, because Linux is OpenGL (Score 1) 50

And AMD can't handle OpenGL. I don't know why, I'm not sure what's so hard, I'm not sure if there's a monster that guards the OpenGL specs in the AMD office or something, but they have sucked at GL for over a decade, and show no signs of getting any better. They can't claim it is because of an API limitation either. For whatever you want to say about the mess that is OpenGL, nVidia makes their GL drivers dead even with their DX drivers. You can use either rendering path and can't tell the difference in features or speed.

That is also why I'm real skeptical that Vulkan is going to do anything for AMD. While they are heavily involved in the development, they are involved with OpenGL's development too (ATi was a voting member on the ARB and is a promoter with Khronos Group). Given that Vulkan is heavily GL based, originally being named glNext, I worry that AMD will suck at performance with it as well.

A fanatic is a person who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill