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Comment: Re:Watch the movie. Not only about carrying weight (Score 1) 60

by PhunkySchtuff (#47292411) Attached to: 3D-Printed Material Can Carry 160,000 Times Its Own Weight

Printing with light, AKA Stereolithography has been around for a long time. The news here is that they're printing feature sizes that are smaller than the wavelength of the light they are using. This involves using metamaterials with a negative index of refraction (among other things)

Comment: Re:Like you could tell the difference between 60fp (Score 2) 62

by PhunkySchtuff (#47261139) Attached to: A Seriously High Speed Video Camera (Video)

Can't tell if serious or trolling.

These cameras are used for slowing things down. You shoot at, say, 600 frames per second and then you can slow it down by 20 times to 30 fps. Watching the video at 30 fps then shows a very smooth slow-motion view of what's happening 20 times faster. One of the examples he gave was in process manufacturing - if you have an assembly line that's jamming at a point, and you can't see why as it's all happening too quickly, shoot it at a high frame rate, slow it down and go over it frame by frame if you need to. Either that or make videos of stuff breaking, getting shot or having water splashed on it and put it on youtube. People love seeing that stuff in slow motion.

Comment: Re:I didn't realise they didn't already did that. (Score 1) 82

by PhunkySchtuff (#46994903) Attached to: Standards Group Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort

What's "purely digital" about a LCD? For a start, there's nothing in this article talking about VGA. I'm talking about DisplayPort (as is the linked article) which has a signal path from the GPU to the monitor (and if you want to be pedantic about it, the DisplayPort interface on the rear of the monitor) that is purely digital. However, if you really want to take it to it's illogical extreme, even the digital signalling used by DisplayPort is, at it's heart, analogue voltages travelling down a bunch of copper wires.

Either way, the signal path, the communications channel, that still has things like a vertical blanking interval and runs between the GPU and the electronics in the monitor is purely digital.

Comment: Re:I didn't realise they didn't already did that. (Score 1) 82

by PhunkySchtuff (#46987439) Attached to: Standards Group Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort

I haven't RTFA, but from what I understand of it, it's not syncing the output from the graphics card to the vertical blanking interval on the monitor, it's the other way around. It's running the monitor at a variable frame rate so that if you're running at (say) 60Hz refresh and the next frame takes 1/60th second + a tiny bit, the monitor can hold off painting the new frame until the data is there to paint it, rather than waiting for 2/60th second before displaying an updated frame. Or, if the next frame is ready early, and the monitor can do so, it can paint the new frame early - so the monitor isn't running at 60Hz, it's running in sync with the output of the graphics card.

Comment: Re:Do it enough times (Score 1) 149

by PhunkySchtuff (#46738443) Attached to: NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

Private key grabbed. Game over.
One successful attempt took >2.5M requests over a day. Second successful attempt was something like 100k requests.

http://blog.cloudflare.com/the...

It's all in the luck of the draw. When you don't have any logging of this, you've got no idea how long people have been poking at this and literally no idea what anyone has made off with.

Comment: Re:Viable Replacement? (Score 1) 242

by PhunkySchtuff (#46688797) Attached to: Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

Yep, I found that too. I had a privately registered domain with afraid.org that still allowed other people to create their own hostnames in that domain. These hostnames were then used to spread malware with the result that I was receiving notices from Google saying my web site was compromised.

I had, say, www.example.com and then others were making asd34ghjb5fbs.example.com and using that to spread malware. Google saw that I owned example.com and so I received the notifications. I'd log into afraid.org and shut down all the hostnames that I didn't create, but they kept getting made even though I had private registration on my domain name.

Comment: Re:Viable Replacement? (Score 1) 242

by PhunkySchtuff (#46688779) Attached to: Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

I've had problems with afraid.org where a privately registered domain I held allowed other people to create their own hostnames in that domain. These hostnames were then used to spread malware with the result that I was receiving notices from Google saying my web site was compromised.

I had, say, www.example.com and then others were making asd34ghjb5fbs.example.com and using that to spread malware. Google saw that I owned example.com and so I received the notifications. I'd log into afraid.org and shut down all the hostnames that I didn't create, but they kept getting made even though I had private registration on my domain name.

Comment: Re:A Microsoft Killswitch (Score 5, Insightful) 214

by PhunkySchtuff (#45980435) Attached to: Microsoft Remotely Deleted Tor From Windows Machines To Stop Botnet

Some people find TOR using a Chrome browser. Should they have the authority to remove that too only to tell you about it later in a blog?

No, of course not. Old, known-bad versions of TOR that have numerous exploits active in the wild are removed. Not Chrome browser as it's not malicious software.

To quote another poster a few threads down

If a PC was infected with Sefnit and had the signature old version of Tor in the hidden location, Tor was removed because it's logically the case that Tor was just part of the virus payload. Because of the unique install directory, there wasn't even a remote chance for false positives. Publicly available tools that can be used for good or bad are hijacked by viruses all the time, and it's never a surprise if an anti-virus removes that tool when the virus specific files are removed.

Comment: Apple Caching Service (Score 1) 159

by PhunkySchtuff (#45743755) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Managing Device-Upgrade Bandwidth Use?

On any Mac in your office, running 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or 10.9 (Mavericks) purchase (for $20 or so), download and install the OS X Server app.
Turn on the Caching service. Problem solved for Apple devices.

The server then registers itself with Apple, they see the registration coming from your IP, so when further devices from that IP address request a software update, these machines are pointed to your internal Caching server. Then, when a device (or a Mac) tries to download an update or purchase something from the App store, it will come from the persistent cache in preference to the WAN.

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