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Comment Re:A perfect example of why tech is cyclical.... (Score 1) 93

Was there ever a time this wasn't true?

Maybe five to ten years ago or so. I think that bandwidth shot up around then, which left us with a brief respite before people started demanding more data with the more bandwidth that they then had. At least, that's the way it seems to me. I was pretty happy with my bandwidth around then. I know that bandwidth has gone up since then, but that the demand for content has gone up more.

That's just my perception, though. YMMV.

At the same time, it seems like some things don't move or don't move much. Video seems to have settled in at around 4-8 Mbit/sec, which even works on some of the lower tiers of Internet service.

That, however, naturally leads me to the next point: Most Internet access isn't symmetrical, and hasn't been since 33.6k modems. I bought the particular level of service I have because I mix audio and video as a side-gig, and I need the outbound bandwidth. This solution from Amazon provides just exactly that, just the latency is kind of high.

Comment Re:How do you define "malicious"? (Score 1) 165

How do you define the word "malicious"?

I think you have to be setting out to cause harm in order for it to count as malicious. As such, I would concede that GNOME made a mistake, but I would think it hyperbolic to say that they that GNOME 3 is malicious.

I think if you want to call something malicious, you have to have set out in the first case with intentions to subvert the user's sovereignty over their own property. Install something I didn't ask for and would have specifically rejected? Malicious. Make it difficult to opt out? Malicious. Report my local drive searches that are none of your business? Malicious. Lock me out of content I bought? Malicious. Bloat my phone with a bunch of apps I can't install? Malicious. Make a dumb-ass design mistake? Dumb-assed, but not malicious.

To conflate bad design with malice dilutes the discussion of things that genuinely are malicious -- that genuinely mean us harm.

Comment Re:The frog is boiling (Score 2) 217

I have two thoughts about this:

First, I find it worrisome, but not as much as when it impacts the non-game software world, i.e. the world of operating systems and productivity software, stuff that either is something everyone uses, or people use to make money, or both. What do you do if your job depends on your computer booting, which it refuses to do?

Second, I don't know if you have noticed or not, but some software companies (Microsoft, for instance) don't even try to hide the fact that there is nothing in the box, because .; . . there is no box. If you buy software from a bricks-and-mortar these days, you often just get a card with a nonce printed on it under a scratch-off spot. You scratch off the spot, go to a specified website, enter the nonce, and your software downloads.

Comment Re:This doesn't seem unusual. (Score 1) 152

(usually only PR or execs can do it)

Truth. Interestingly enough, this makes it very easy to tell the official story from the unofficial, when there has been an incident of some sort. All you have to do to filter (or filter out) the official story is grep for a pattern like /tak(ing|es) .* seriously/. Try it! It works surprisingly well.

Comment Re:custom rom (Score 1) 208

If you don't mind me asking, what carrier, which version of the S4 mini, and what ROM did you use?

I have an S4 mini, CDMA/LTE version, on Sprint, so this interests me. The battery life is not currently bad, but it would be interesting to de-bloat the firmware.

Comment Re:How? (Score 1) 368

Just exactly how do they propose 'taking out' a drone?

There is at least one case where a drone was taken out by a fire hose at a house fire. The troubling thing in that case, though, is that a firefighter took his hose off of the fire to take out a drone that was far enough away as not to be causing any real problem. The fire department ended up replacing the drone.

Life in the state of nature is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short. - Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan