Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
What's the story with these ads on Slashdot? Check out our new blog post to find out. ×

Comment Re:Problem with the solution? (Score 2) 193

I think the problem here is that yes, you don't want to waste the time, but you (and few others) are willing to pay what it would really cost to offer fast airborne bandwidth.

A few Mbps are really quite adequate for 99% of the users that *need* in-air connectivity (or simply want it to prevent being bored, like me with IRC and web browsing). If people want to do heavy VNC work or video streaming on board aircraft, they're going to have to pay more than $20 for it. It's that simple.

Comment Re: Question from a non American (Score 1) 203

The largest Canadian airports have US preclearance, so you clear before you leave Canada. Smaller Canadian airports with US service still have passengers clear customs and immigration at the American airport where they land.

Some Caribbean, Irish, and Middle Eastern airports have US preclearance too but as far as I know, none of these airlines serve LaGuardia.

Comment Re:Try an M-DISC (Score 1) 169

In the cool and dark, colour film will last a long time - my earliest colour photos were taken in the 1970s and 1980s and are still doing well. It's a pity we lost Kodachrome; it's probably good for a century. But we did lose it.

That having been said, separate black and white rolls each shot with a different colour channel would be very archival. If correctly processed and kept dry and cool, they are probably good for 100-200 years minimum.

Comment Re:50-100 years? (Score 1) 169

1965? Paper. Analog LPs. Reel-to-reel tape (if you can find a tape player; they're around but hard to find). Some really old audio Compact Cassettes (for which players are still easy to find). But most importantly... motion picture film and still photos on film and photographic paper.

Even if you didn't have a projector, you could look at a movie film and see what it was about. You could fashion a projector, or scan the images and assemble them digitally. Film is pretty cool that way.

Comment Re:Incredible! (Score 1) 204

Atari 2600 cartridges are 4 kB maximum. It's certainly possible the game only used a fraction of that, but highly unlikely.

The 2600 did only have 128 bytes of RAM, but none of this would be needed for the program itself, which would be accessed directly from cartridge ROM by the CPU. On the ZX, the code would have to fit within the 1kB and the remaining RAM would be available for its execution.

Comment It all depends on your eyes. (Score 1) 464

I've got one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye, and both are astigmatic. Wearing glasses really wasn't a choice for me. If I want to see clearly, I have to wear them.

I got progressive lenses when I got diagnosed with presbyopia at age 35 (seriously), and I got used to them, surprisingly, right away. Yes, they're slightly less convenient because the near focus area is toward the bottom of the lens, so you'll want your displays to be a little lower than you might be able to tolerate them if you don't have presbyopia.

One other option, if you need correction for nearer focus, is to get a pair of single-vision reading glasses (i.e. glasses that lack the progressive lens/bifocal feature and are geared to your near vision, sacrificing your distance vision). I got a pair, quite sure I'd need them for my computer work, and the reality is that I really don't. I do, however, find them to be indispensible in certain situations, most notably trying to watch televisions in economy class of aircraft - I no longer have to crane my neck!

Every successful person has had failures but repeated failure is no guarantee of eventual success.

Working...