Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Comment Re:The takeaway is that Tesla is right (Score 1) 49

Dealers have a conflict of interest because manufacturers are dumb. Manufacturers have variable margins built into the cars that encourage sales. One would hope they line up with the maker's desires (or profits), but often they don't. And makers like GM that have $2000 rebates on everything almost all the time encourage buyers to avoid them when there isn't a sale.

Comment Re:Windows 7 (Score 2) 304

Funny, because I had an laptop that came with Vista SP1. Later when I upgraded it to Windows 7, I wondered why I even bothered since it looked and performed exactly the same.

And I had a laptop that came with Vista. It was totally unusable. Then SP1 came out and it became mildly usable. Then I got Windows 7 on it and the difference was like night and day. Boot times were cut by far more than half. Time to usability after login, likewise. Responsiveness increased dramatically. Crashes reduced likewise. Windows 7 in particular uses less memory than Vista; Vista chokes on 2GB systems and doesn't become acceptable until 3 or 4GB, and 7 is acceptable in 512MB and fine in 1GB. This is not a big deal today when RAM is practically free — I have 16GB in my budget desktop, and that only because I like to run virtual machine and keep them running while I run big, memory-hungry apps. At the time, it was a big deal.

Comment Re:Yeah, I've worked with a few of those (Score 1) 416

Yes, I'm pretty sure that the correlation is the other way than the headline.

Based on what evidence?

That would-be terrorists are more likely to become engineers, in part to get the necessary skills to make the "tools of the trade".

Seems like a slow and expensive way to learn how to make a bomb.

Comment Re: Time to change my job description.... (Score 1) 416

That is true, but stupid people often think that anyone wearing a turban is Islamic. Seriously.

As a side note, It's interesting to see that Gamergate's war against "corruption in the games media" now extends to fabricating evidence to slander their critics. I guess Gamergaters really are dedicated to showing us all who the truly dishonest people are...

Comment Re:release notes should have informed users (Score 1) 304

AMD A8-7600 with 8 GB of RAM and an ADATA SSD. Basic low end desktop and it runs like a dream.

That's not really a low end desktop, not even today.

Not a low end desktop, but worse than my laptop I paid less than $1000 for 3 years ago. Though I'm due for an upgrade, GTX 850M just doesn't cut it.

Comment Re:Reasons why I don't like the Internet of Things (Score 1) 192

I'm a fan of home automation (a hobby of mine that's increasingly turning into a business). I, and many fellow HA enthusiasts, are firm proponents of the LAN of Things, or even a Separate Network - Controlled By a Hub That is Only Allowed To Connect To the Internet Under Strict Conditions - Of Things.

That's not IOT, that's IOC - Internet of Controllers. Those pushing the IoT want every home device on a unique IPv6 address and able to talk to anything. The only IoT I've seen sold is by shitty wireless companies trying to sell private networks over their mobile systems. Even those selling IoT don't actually want IoT. Because if you don't control it in a single secure central server, you can't extract payment for every use. And it's all about extracting money from people.

Comment ...or the difference may be totally insignificant. (Score 1) 416

The marginal increase in the probability of an someone being a terrorist given that you know he's an engineer may be startling in relative terms, but in absolute terms it's insignificant.

Estimates of total active membership in terror groups worldwide is under 200,000, but let's assume there's even million active terrorists just for the sake of having round numbers and not having to quibble over where to put the decimal point. There are seven billion people in the world, so the rate of terrorist participation in the general population is 14 thousandths of a percent; let's call that p(T), and call the probability that someone is a terrorist given that they're an engineer p(T|E). Let's look at the absolute marginal difference being an engineer makes, i.e.:P(T|E) - P(T)

i. p(T) = 0.0001428
i. p(T|E) = 9 * P(T) = 0.001286
iii. P(T|E) - P(T) = 0.001143

So being an engineer increases your chance of being a terrorist by at most about 1/10 of 1% under wildly pessimistic assumptions. In fact the marginal difference is really more like 1/50 of 1%. Now it's interesting that the rates of terrorism are so much larger among engineers than other people, but it has little practical significance and being an engineer myself that's what I'm most concerned with. If you were designing a surveillance program and were picking out groups that need keeping tabs on, 1/10 % is a grasping-at-straws number

Comment Re:If I read this right (Score 1) 416

1) Jesus brought a new covenant, so yes we ignore the stuff from the old testament.

2) Jesus was using a metaphor. There are tons of them in the bible (did you know the Kingdom of God isn't literally a mustard seed?! Huh!). You'll notice also HE brought the (metaphorical) sword. He did not give it to his followers, and he never used it. He strictly forbade his followers from using the physical sword.

Now tell me how many people Mohamed murdered and crucified? This is the horror of multiculturalism: you cannot tell the difference between christianity and its exact opposite islam.

Because of this, the Mohammedans, who do not give a shit about your whiny multicultural bullshit will behead you and rape your women. I'll be fine though. Even in ISIS lands they're not killing Christians so long as they pay the jizya.

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.