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Android

Embedded Linux Conference Headlined By Drones

Posted by Soulskill
from the penguins-can-fly dept.
DeviceGuru writes: The Linux Foundation has released the full agenda for its annual North American Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit, which takes place Mar. 23-25 in San Jose, Calif. The ELC, which this year is titled Drones, Things, and Automobiles, increasingly reflects new opportunities for Linux in areas such as drones, robots, automotive computers, IoT gizmos, 3D sensing, modular phones, and much more. For those worried that ELC is skimping on the basics as it explores the more colorful sides of Linux, worry not, as there are still plenty of sessions on booting, trace analysis, NAND support, PHY frameworks, power management, defragmenting, systemd, device tree, and toolchain.

+ - Embedded Linux Conference Hijacked by Drones->

Submitted by DeviceGuru
DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The Linux Foundation has released the full agenda for its annual North American Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit, which takes place Mar. 23-25 in San Jose, Calif. The ELC, which this year is titled Drones, Things, and Automobiles, increasingly reflects new opportunities for Linux in areas such as drones, robots, automotive computers, IoT gizmos, 3D sensing, modular phones, and much more. For those worried that ELC is skimping on the basics as it explores the more colorful sides of Linux, worry not, as there are still plenty of sessions on booting, trace analysis, NAND support, PHY frameworks, power management, defragmenting, systemd, device tree, and toolchain."
Link to Original Source
Wireless Networking

FCC Prohibits Blocking of Personal Wi-Fi Hotspots 40

Posted by Soulskill
from the don't-be-a-jerk-marriott dept.
alphadogg writes: The FCC on Tuesday warned that it will no longer tolerate hotels, convention centers or others intentionally interfering with personal Wi-Fi hotspots. This issue grabbed headlines last fall when Marriott International was fined $600,000 for blocking customer Wi-Fi hotspots, presumably to encourage the guests to pay for pricey Internet access from the hotel.

+ - FCC calls blocking of personal Wi-Fi hotspots "disturbing trend"->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "The FCC on Tuesday warned http://transition.fcc.gov/Dail... that it will no longer tolerate hotels, convention centers or others intentionally interfering with personal Wi-Fi hotspots. This issue grabbed headlines last fall when Marriott International was fined $600K for blocking customer Wi-Fi hotspots, presumably to encourage the guests to pay for pricey Internet access from the hotel."
Link to Original Source

+ - Latest Windows 10 Preview Build Brings Unexpectedly Large Number of Enhancements

Submitted by Deathspawner
Deathspawner (1037894) writes "Following its huge Windows 10 event last Wednesday, Microsoft released a brand-new preview build to the public, versioned 9926. We were told that it'd give us Cortana, Microsoft's AI assistant, as well as a revamped Start menu and updated notifications pane. But as it turns out, that's not even close to summing up all that's new with this build. In fact, 9926 is easily the most substantial update rolled out so far in the beta program, with some UI elements and integral Windows features seeing their first overhaul in multiple generations."
Science

Engineers Develop 'Ultrarope' For World's Highest Elevator 124

Posted by Soulskill
from the for-when-super-rope-just-doesn't-cut-it dept.
HughPickens.com writes: Halfway up the Shard, London's tallest skyscraper, you are asked to step out of the elevator at the transfer floor, or "sky lobby," a necessary inconvenience in order to reach the upper half of the building, and a symptom of the limits of elevators today. To ascend a mile-high (1.6km) tower using the same technology could necessitate changing elevators as many as 10 times. Elevators traveling distances of more than 500m [1,640 ft] have not been feasible because the weight of the steel cables themselves becomes so great. Now, after nine years of rigorous testing, Kone has released Ultrarope — a material composed of carbon-fiber covered in a friction-proof coating that weighs a seventh of the steel cables, making elevators of up to 1km (0.6 miles) in height feasible to build.

Kone's creation was chosen to be installed in what's destined to become the world's tallest building, the Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. When completed in 2020, the tower will stand a full kilometer in height, and will boast the world's tallest elevator at 660m (2,165ft). A 1km-tall tower may seem staggering, but is this the build-able limit? Most probably not, according to Dr. Sang Dae Kim. "With Kingdom Tower we now have a design that reaches around 1 km in height. Later on, someone will push for 1 mile, and then 2 km," says Kim. He adds that, technically speaking, 2 km might be possible at the current time. Anything higher would require new materials and building techniques.

+ - Engineers Develop 'Ultrarope" For World's Highest Elevator 1

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Halfway up the Shard, London’s tallest skyscraper, you are asked to step out of the elevator at the transfer floor or “sky lobby,” a necessary inconvenience in order to reach the upper half of the building, and a symptom of the limits of elevators today. To ascend a mile-high (1.6km) tower using the same technology could necessitate changing elevators as many as 10 times because elevators traveling distances of more than 500m [1,640 ft] have not been feasible because the weight of the steel cables themselves becomes so great. Now BBC reports that after nine years of rigorous testing, Kone has released Ultrarope — a material composed of carbon-fiber covered in a friction-proof coating that weighs a seventh of the steel cables, making elevators of up to 1km (0.6 miles) in height feasible to build. Kone's creation was chosen to be installed in what's destined to become the world's tallest building, the Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. When completed in 2020, the tower will stand a full kilometer in height, and will boast the world's tallest elevator at 660m (2,165ft). A 1km-tall tower may seem staggering, but is this the buildable limit? Most probably not, according to Dr Sang Dae Kim. “With Kingdom Tower we now have a design that reaches around 1 km in height. Later on, someone will push for 1 mile, and then 2 km,” says Kim adding that, technically speaking, a 2 km might be possible at the current time. “At this point in time we can build a tower that is 1 km, maybe 2 km. Any higher than that and we will have to do a lot of homework.”"
Programming

Ask Slashdot: What Makes a Great Software Developer? 117

Posted by Soulskill
from the highlander-style-combat dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes: What does it take to become a great — or even just a good — software developer? According to developer Michael O. Church's posting on Quora (later posted on LifeHacker), it's a long list: great developers are unafraid to learn on the job, manage their careers aggressively, know the politics of software development (which he refers to as 'CS666'), avoid long days when feasible, and can tell fads from technologies that actually endure... and those are just a few of his points. Over at Salsita Software's corporate blog, meanwhile, CEO and founder Matthew Gertner boils it all down to a single point: experienced programmers and developers know when to slow down. What do you think separates the great developers from the not-so-fantastic ones?

+ - What Makes a Great Software Developer?->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "What does it take to become a great—or even just a good—software developer? According to developer Michael O. Church’s posting on Quora (later posted on LifeHacker), it's a long list: great developers are unafraid to learn on the job, manage their careers aggressively, know the politics of software development (which he refers to as 'CS666'), avoid long days when feasible, and can tell fads from technologies that actually endure... and those are just a few of his points. Over at Salsita Software’s corporate blog, meanwhile, CEO and founder Matthew Gertner boils it all down to a single point: experienced programmers and developers know when to slow down. What do you think separates the great developers from the not-so-fantastic ones?"
Link to Original Source
Space

Gamma-ray Bursts May Explain Fermi's Paradox 108

Posted by Soulskill
from the fault-in-our-stars dept.
An anonymous reader writes: A new study confirms the potential hazard of nearby gamma-ray bursts. It quantifies the probability of an event near Earth, and more generally in the Milky Way and other galaxies over time: "[Evolved] life as it exists on Earth could not take place in almost any galaxy that formed earlier than about five billion years after the Big Bang." This could explain the Fermi's paradox, or why we don't see billion-year-old civilizations all around us.

+ - Book review: Designing and Building a Security Operations Center

Submitted by benrothke
benrothke (2577567) writes "Title:Designing and Building a Security Operations Center

Author: David Nathans

Pages: 276

Publisher: Syngress

Rating: 8/10

Reviewer: Ben Rothke

ISBN: 978-0128008997

Summary: Good introduction to those looking to build their own security operations center





Many organizations are overwhelmed by the onslaught of security data from disparate systems, platforms and applications. They have numerous point solutions (anti-virus, firewalls, IDS/IPS, ERP, access control, IdM, single sign-on, etc.) that can create millions of daily log messages. In addition to directed attacks becoming more frequent and sophisticated, there are regulatory compliance issues that place increasing burden on security, systems and network administrators.



This creates a large amount of information and log data without a formal mechanism to deal with it. This has led to many organizations creating a security operations center (SOC). A SOC in its most basic form is the centralized team that deals with information security incidents and related issues.



In Designing and Building a Security Operations Center, author David Nathans provides the basics on how that can be done. An effective SOC provides the benefit of speed of response time to a security incident. Be it a DDoS attack or malware which can spread throughout a corporate network in minutes, and potentially knock out the network, every second counts in identifying these attacks and negating them before they can cause additional damage. Having a responsive SOC can make all the difference in how a firms deals with these security issues.



The book notes that the SOC is akin to an enterprise nervous systemthat can gather and normalize vast amounts of log and related data. This can provide continuous prevention, protection and detection by providing response capabilities against threats, remotely exploitable vulnerabilities and real-time incidents on the monitored network.



The books 11 chapters provide a start for anyone considering building out their own SOC. Topics include required infrastructure, organizational structure, staffing and daily operations, to training, metrics, outsourcing and more.



When building a SOC, the choices are for the most part doing it yourself (DIY) or using an outsourced managed security service provider (MSSP). The book focuses primarily on the DIY approach, while chapter 10 briefly details the issues and benefits of using a MSSP. The book provides the pros and cons of each approach. Some firms have a hybrid approach where they perform some SOC activities and outsource others. But the book doesn't details that approach.



The book provides a large amount of details on the many tasks needed to create an internal SOC. The truth is that many firms simply don't have the staff and budget needed to support an internal SOC. They also don't have the budget for an MSSP. With that, Mike Rothman of Securosis noted that these firms are "trapped on the hamster wheel of pain, reacting without sufficient visibility, but without time to invest in gaining that much-needed visibility into threats without diving deep into raw log files".



One important topic the book does not cover is around SIM/SIEM/SEM software. SIEM software can provide a firm with real-time analysis of security alerts generated by network and security hardware, software and other applications.



Many benefits come from an effective SIEM tool being the backbone of the SOC. A SIEM tool consolidates all data and analyzes it intelligently and provides visualization into the environment. But selecting the appropriate SIEM and correctly deploying it is not a trivial endeavor.



Those looking for a good reference on SIEM should read: Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) Implementation, which I reviewed on Slashdot - http://books.slashdot.org/story/11/02/23/1328243/book-review-security-information-and-event-management-implementation. That book does provide an excellent overview of the topic and will be of value to those reading looking for answer around SIEM. Those looking for a solid introduction to the world of SIEM should definitely get a copy.



The book notes that the most important part of a SOC, and often the most overlooked, is that of the SOC analyst. And with that, the book writes how it's important to be cognizant of the fact of SOC analyst burnout. SOC analysts can burnout and it's important for an organization to have a plan to address this, including aspects of training, management opportunities and job rotation.



Building an in-house SOC takes significant planning an attention to detail and the book details a lot of the particulars that are required for an effective SOC design.



The implementation of a SOC will cost a significant amount of money and management will often want to have metrics to let them know what the SOC is doing. The book spends a brief amount of time on SOC metrics; which is a topic that warrants a book in its own right. There are many metrics that can be created to measure SOC efficacy. Effective SOC metrics will measure how quickly incidents are handled by the SOC, and how incident are identified, addressed and handled.



The downside to metrics is that they must be used judiciously. It's important not to measure base performance of a SOC analyst simply on the number of events analyzed or recommendations written. Metrics used in that manner are akin to help desk where analysts are only concerned about getting calls finished, in order to meet their calls completed metrics.



As important as a SOC is, this is surprisingly the first book written on the topic. At under 250 pages, the book provides an introduction to the topic, but is not a comprehensive work on the topic. There are areas in SOC management that the book doesn't cover, such as SOC documentation, creating and using SOC operation run books, and more.



But even with those missing areas, Designing and Building a Security Operations Centeris a good reference to start with. A SOC is a security component most organizations are in dire need of, and the book is a good way to get them started on that effort.





Reviewed by Ben Rothke"
Games

Inside the Largest Virtual Psychology Lab In the World 49

Posted by Soulskill
from the encouraging-gamers-to-not-mention-your-mom dept.
bearhuntz writes: Riot Games has been using League of Legends as a psychology lab to run scientific experiments and reduce toxic player behavior for a while now. This article explains some of the experiments they're doing, and what the results have been. "For example, one product is a restricted chat mode that limits the number of messages abusive players can type per match. It’s a temporary punishment that has led to a noticeable improvement in player behavior afterward —on average, individuals who went through a period of restricted chat saw 20 percent fewer abuse reports filed by other players. The restricted chat approach also proved 4 percent more effective at improving player behavior than the usual punishment method of temporarily banning toxic players. Even the smallest improvements in player behavior can make a huge difference in an online game that attracts 67 million players every month."
Youtube

YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default 161

Posted by Soulskill
from the now-if-they-can-ditch-the-commenters dept.
An anonymous reader writes: YouTube today announced it has finally stopped using Adobe Flash by default. The site now uses its HTML5 video player by default in Google's Chrome, Microsoft's IE11, Apple's Safari 8, and in beta versions of Mozilla's Firefox browser. At the same time, YouTube is now also defaulting to its HTML5 player on the web. In fact, the company is deprecating the "old style" Flash object embeds and its Flash API, pointing users to the iFrame API instead, since the latter can adapt depending on the device and browser you're using.

I think there's a world market for about five computers. -- attr. Thomas J. Watson (Chairman of the Board, IBM), 1943

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