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Comment: Re:It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 1) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49317393) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

If someone stole a pile of valid ballots, and filled them out and stuffed them, how would the recount be able to separate valid ballots from invalid ballots?

You mean already filled ones from the box or blanks? Hopefully somebody will see you trying to steal a bunch of filed ballots during the counting. Blanks are counted and there shouldn't be any missing.

If there are too many ballots counted (compared to the number of people who voted) there may be a re-voting (if the results are close enough to warrant this).

However, it is advised that if you do not care who wins (or all choices for you are bad) you still should go and then invalidate your ballot, to make it even harder for someone to vote "for you".

Also, sometimes during counting they may find "suspicious" ballots, for example a bunch of ballots seemingly filled with the same handwriting. It may trigger an investigation.

Comment: Re:It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 1) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49315273) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

There are a few safeguards against this and sometimes they work.
1. The voters have to put their signature in the list before getting the ballot. The signatures are counted and if the number of ballots does not match the number of signatures there could be a problem (especially if there are more ballots than signatures, if there are less ballots then it could mean somebody took their ballot home).
2. There are a few observers (from different parties) both during the voting process and when the ballots are counted.
3. If the results are suspicious, a candidate could demand a recount.
4. If there is evidence of large fraud, the results are invalidated and the voters get to vote again. This happened this year in one area.

Now, obviously there are ways to cheat the system, but probably no system will ever be completely secure. After all, the result database could be altered even if the votes were counted correctly.

Comment: Re:It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 1) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49313457) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

I live in Lithuania. Here you mark the ballot and put it in the box with all the other ballots. At the end of the voting, the box is opened and ballots are counted. If there are any other marks on the ballot other than the voting mark, the ballot is rejected and counted as invalid.

Comment: Re:Information content (Score 5, Informative) 79

by Pentium100 (#49310247) Attached to: MRIs Show Our Brains Shutting Down When We See Security Prompts

Also, the warnings all are very similar even though the problems they warn about are different. Let's take a look at SSL warnings. When a browser puts up the huge warning that there is a problem with SSL, it could mean one of a few things:
1) The certificate is self-signed. A big problem except for internal sites.
2) The certificate expired 10 minutes ago or you computer's clock is wrong (not that big a problem).
3) The certificate is for a different domain. This could be a problem or not, depending on the domain (could be the certificate is issued for www.example.com and I am going to example.com or 127.0.0.1).
4) The mobile browser does not understand wildcard certificates.

The problem is that the warnings all look the same and to find out which problem it is, you have to click on the "Technical details" button.

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49307231) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

The LPG setup was done by professionals about 10 years ago. I actually have problems with fixing the body etc. Electric stuff is easy, so are the parts where I can remove said part, repair and replace it. OTOH, patching a rust hole in the body is a big problem. Converting a gasoline car to LPG saves a lot of money if you drive more, because, at least in my country, LPG price is about 41% of gasoline (A-95) price, but the car does not burn twice as much of it.

As there are not a lot of cars like mine left, I do sometimes get nice reactions from people at a gas station or wherever.

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49301187) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

I'd like to see how your setup works.

You are right, I cannot just pipe LPG to a carburetor. The LPG goes to a regulator that reduces the pressure to around 1 bar and a pipe from the regulator goes to the air intake of the engine (between the air filter and carburetor).

LPG cools down when it expands, so the engine has problems starting nad running when its cold. It is recommended to use LPG only when the engine temperature is above 40C. The regulator is heated by the hot antifreeze from the engine during normal operation.

There are valves tat control gasoline and LPG flows. I can switch one on or switch both off. To start the engine when its cold I have to switch on gasoline, start the engine (can take a few turns for the mechanical fuel pump to get the gas to the float bowl), wait for it to warm up (can drive during that time), switch off gasoline, drive until the float bowl is empty and turn on the LPG.

When I come home from work, I switch the fuel to gasoline for a few seconds and then turn off the engine. This way the float bowl is full and the engine starts quickly the next day.

As for the modern cars - going to a mechanic takes time (most of them work at the same time that I do, so I have to excuse myself from work) while I can repair the faults that I am able to during the weekend (if the problem is not big) or on the side of the road (if it's something that prevents the car from working). Modern cars do not require frequent adjustments, sure, but maybe that's because they are still relatively new. My car is 33 years old.(it has been in our family for 19 years now). Maybe a car made in 2010 will have as much or more problems than my car in 2043 (with less ability to repair)...

Comment: Re:It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 1) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49298641) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

Politicians are free to switch parties after the election in my country too. Also, the parliament elections are twofold. 70 seats are divided among parties, the parties publish lists of candidates before the election and the seats are given according to those lists, however, voters can optionally give priority votes for up to 5 candidates in the list. So, some candidate in the middle of the list could get a lot of votes and in turn, the seat instead of a candidate above him on the list. In practice it still means that candidates from the top of the list will get the seats.

Additional 71 seats are given differently. Here, there are candidates for each area (the country is divided into 71 areas) and you get to choose one. The options are different in each area.

Presidential elections are just for individuals (usually there are 20 or so candidates).

City council elections are now twofold, like the parliament elections - you get to choose a list (to divide the whatever council seats there are) and a mayor.

A list that gets 5% or more votes gets some seats in proportion to the votes. An idividual that gets more then 50% votes is elected. If not individual gets over 50% votes, you get a second round with the two candidates who got the most votes in the first round.

Comment: Re: It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 1) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49298533) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

It's Lithuania. Sure, some of the 20 choices are really small parties that do not get any votes, but others do, there is usually 4-5 different "main" parties. That list changes sometimes, a new party could get a lot of votes and some seats in the parliament. (in the last election 7 parties passed the 5% barrier and got some seats).

Also, my city elected a Mayor who does not belong to any party. His committee also got a lot of seats in the council (17 out of 41, with the previous Mayor's party getting 13).

The difference between a party and a committee is that a party is long term, but the committee is generally formed for a particular election.

Comment: Re:It is time to get up one way or the other (Score 3, Interesting) 1087

by Pentium100 (#49295507) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

As I understand, in the US you get to choose one from two candidates (unlike in my country where there are 20 or so parties etc you get a lot to choose from in the first round). What if both choices are bad? I actually had that problem once. Two candidates made it to the second round (which happens if no candidate gets over 50% of votes in the first round) and both were people for whom I did not want to vote. I just went and marked both candidates, making the ballot invalid. I did got to vote because it's harder for someone to fake my vote that way.

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49294273) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

Cleaning the carb once in 30 years doesn't seem so bad. Also, as if fuel injection does not fail or just wear out...

I would still need to work on a newer car too, unless modern cars are now failure proof, something will wear out or just fail over time (if I bought a newer car I would be expecting to drive it for many years). The problem will be that when that happens (inevitably before or during some trip), it will be more difficult to repair.

As for the fuel consumption, well, one, it's not that bad (and LPG is quite cheap) and two, as I really dislike environmentalists, I now at least have the option of turning the mixture screw just a little bit when they annoy me enough. I have never done this, mind you, yet, just that I have the option.

1964 Cadillac, eh. I always though that if I had the money to buy a second car it would be soething lie a 1974 Cadillac, seems great, well, other than the fact that it only has an automatic transmission (I am not used to it and like the control that a manual transmission offers me).

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49294139) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

Your car already contains millions of lines of code, so this is not a new issue.

My car doesn't. Last time I checked, there were no CPUs in my car (other than in the tape deck), didn't find one when cleaning the carburetor too...

When they built my car in 1982, it looks like computers were not as common as they became later.

Comment: Re:Death traps. (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49292479) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

I like things I understand. My car is simple enough that I can understand it. When I took apart and cleaned the carburetor , not only my car started running better (the intended result), but I got more insight into how it works. For example, when the engine is cold and the RPM is increased, when the engine warms up, the RPM does not decrease until I briefly press the accelerator pedal (which means that this situation does not really happen when I am driving, just when I am warming up the engine in a very cold winter day). This is due to the way the cam that adjusts the throttle works.

Pretty much anything in the car can be understood easily - this pushes that, which rotates this, which moves that etc... Even if I got access to the source code of a modern car, it would be really difficult for me to understand it, and the mechanical systems are more complex too.

Also, with my car it is quite easy to repair or replace parts - here is a lot of empty space, no need to remove a wheel to change a lightbulb. In the time that it takes to change the lightbulb in a modern car I could probably change the whole headlamp assembly (which I have removed, replaced the reflectors (old ones were rusted) and put back in).

Comment: Re:greedy liar (Score 1) 451

by Pentium100 (#49290175) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

I would never share my car with strangers. I have some tools in the trunk, a good audio system, some tapes etc. I like my car. I would not want to essentially give it to somebody and get a different car in return. Even if all cars were completely identical, I would have to carry a suitcase with the stuff that I leave in the car now, which would be inconvenient.

The ones where you simply pick up a car wherever you find it (your iPhone App will show you the nearest ones if you are looking), drive to where you want, and leave it there for the next person to take.

And those cars don't get stolen?

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