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Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 208

by Penguinisto (#49183657) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

He was very frustrated and distraught at having to leave the Navy.

He didn't leave entirely... during WWII he worked at the Pentagon with Isaac Asimov, John Campbell, and a couple of other prominent authors on top-secret (at the time) projects involving quite a bit of technology development (including what would eventually become high-altitude pressure suits, if that gives you an idea).

Dude even broke Navy protocol and hired smart women to the team, as he managed the projects under his care.

If I remember right, he retained his rank at the time.

Comment: Re:There might be hope for a decent adaptation (Score 1) 208

by Penguinisto (#49183557) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

IIRC parts of Earth were - notably India (and China?), where the populations were too large to otherwise sustain.

The Lunar colonies began as a ginormous prison, but the expense of sending parolees and ex-cons home was too onerous; so they stayed, formed their own society, and grew on their own.

I think the premise is still quite doable, especially if there were some condition on Earth which prevented agricultural production from reaching its current capacity.

Comment: Re:Fascism largely a creation of director Verhoeve (Score 1) 208

by Penguinisto (#49183529) Attached to: 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress' Coming To the Big Screen

Discussion point: Can it be said to be voluntary if it's necessary for a major societal function?

Given that only half of the voting population actually votes in the US, I'm not so sure that suffrage is considered to be a major societal function.

Even in the book, Rico's old man is a successful businessman, and had never enlisted (at least not until way later in the book after shit got real, as you yourself mention), and basic human rights (outside of voting) were allegedly guaranteed to all regardless.

SST the book wasn't, I think, fascist, but it was awfully fetishistic of the military. It was St Crispin's Day/Band of Brothers in Space.

I disagree, but only a little - the military was mostly a vehicle from which to tell the story, and it portrayed quite vividly many of the morals and weltanschauung (for lack of a better term) that military service imparts on those who enter it. More importantly, it explained it in a way that civilians could put to use in their own daily lives.

Comment: Re:Same guy? (Score 1) 94

by Penguinisto (#49181565) Attached to: The Mexican Drug Cartels' Involuntary IT Guy

Whatever Hillary did/does is SOP throughout the entire system, which really is a series of cartels. If you want to flog the dead horse, knock yourself out. It will make no difference at election time.

...might make a difference in this case, considering that it was set up on the down-low (as opposed to a Hotmail/Yahoo freemail account). Also, you misspelled "primaries" up there, where it would make a pretty sizable difference. In elections, its impact would be in the timing of a big event surrounding it's disclosure or prosecution. ;)

What was the name of that movie where the doctor is kidnapped to deal with gunshot wounds?

Dr. Zhivago had that in the latter part of its storyline.

Comment: Re:Nah (Score 1) 94

by Penguinisto (#49181353) Attached to: The Mexican Drug Cartels' Involuntary IT Guy

Thinking that's the most likely outcome from my POV as well.

After all, if you're pressed into service as a "hacker", it wouldn't take much to discreetly slip information to the authorities, considering that most cartel types don't strike me as being technically uber-literate. Sure it would be a massive risk, but totally doable depending on the environment.

Comment: Re:scientific computing (Score 1) 114

by Penguinisto (#49181101) Attached to: Linux 4.0 Getting No-Reboot Patching

scientific computing. One of the weak points of OSX

I would have guessed that the high price per unit work for their proprietary hardware would be the limiting factor.

Not really - you can still buy old XServe boxes for a relatively reasonable price, pack them with RAM, and load ESXi on each one so that you can run a buttload of little OSX VMs on each one. Yes, it's perfectly legit to do exactly that under the Apple EULA (I did it for a former employer who wanted rack-mounted OSX instances for testing - it was its own little cluster in a vSphere farm, and it was far easier to clone off replacements or new VMs.)

Comment: Re:scientific computing (Score 1) 114

by Penguinisto (#49181069) Attached to: Linux 4.0 Getting No-Reboot Patching

If you have weeks long running jobs on your desktop you're doing it wrong.

Some of us cannot afford our very own personal render farm, or justify the cost of renting time on one, merely to satisfy our little hobbies. ;)

Personally though, it's not just work that keeps us from rebooting. On my part, it's usually a month or two between reboots on my MBP laptop, and even then patching is usually the only reason... why bother waiting for a full boot process to finish when I don't have to? Close the lid and let it go to sleep... it's only a few seconds waiting for it to wake up when I want to use it again.

Comment: Re:Classic Case (Score 3, Insightful) 138

by Penguinisto (#49180917) Attached to: Technology's Legacy: the 'Loser Edit' Awaits Us All

One way to put a lid on this sort of behavior is to remove anonymity. It would solve a lot of problems, and it doesn't interfere with freedom of speech - you can still say what you want, you just have to own it, same as if you stood up in the public square and said the same things.

Thomas Paine would say you have a very bad idea there.

There are times when anonymity serves a greater purpose. If I lived in a predominately Islamic-ruled country and wanted to criticize the ruling class about their policies towards women, or introduce the idea that maybe Islam is not a good basis for a legal system, I damned sure would want to remain anonymous while doing so, lest I wind up getting imprisoned or whipped to within an inch of my life over the charge of "blasphemy" (yes, that's a thing in some places, and yes, it goes on even today.)

A better US-based reason? Leaks to the press. Leaks are what point us to uncovering crimes and misdemeanors by public officials. A historical example? Watergate's "Deep Throat". A recent example? Mrs. Clinton's little habit of accepting massive amounts of payola from foreign sources to her "charity" while she was Secretary of State. If it weren't for a leak to the press, no one outside of a few elites would know about it.

So no, m'dear - removing anonymity is not a good thing.

Comment: Re:Bad idea (Score 3, Insightful) 630

by Penguinisto (#49174531) Attached to: Snowden Reportedly In Talks To Return To US To Face Trial

However, you're not really going to be doing much better with the Russian government that the US government...

Won't have to... just work for a private company in some capacity. Even if it wasn't in tech, I'd rather be a lowly factory worker in East Bumfuck, Russia than a famous prisoner in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Comment: Re:Don't do it, Snowden! (Score 2) 630

by Penguinisto (#49174257) Attached to: Snowden Reportedly In Talks To Return To US To Face Trial

plus, well, russia is a shit-hole. who in their right mind would want to STAY there if you've known and grown up with better?

Compared to Club Fed (if you're lucky - Death Row if you're not)?

I'll take "Shit-holes I'd rather spend the rest of my natural life in since prison or death are the only other alternatives" for $1000, Alex!

Comment: Re:Bad idea (Score 4, Insightful) 630

by Penguinisto (#49174171) Attached to: Snowden Reportedly In Talks To Return To US To Face Trial

Thinking the same thing here.

I love living here and all, but damn - if I were a young single guy and my home country wants me imprisoned (or worse - probably worse) over uncovering illegal activities they committed?

Screw that - I could learn Russian easily enough, many of the women there are reportedly rather cute, vodka ain't that bad as far as booze goes, and I can easily deal with living in cold-ass weather 9 months of the year.

Comment: Re:Politics aside for a moment. (Score 1) 520

It's also rather difficult to discipline a child that would turn around and threaten the parent with a social services report for abuse.

I'm the oldest of eight... my youngest brother tried that stunt when he was 14; I was visiting at the time of the incident, and the little punk was acting out, thinking he was a badass (all of us boys did that, and we all learned the hard way that the old man will call your bluff without hesitation). Anyrate, the cops did indeed show up, and my old man told him exactly what happened, and then said "...and if he wants to go into foster care so bad, I'd love to drop him off into it right about now." The cop laughed. One of my sisters immediately chimed in and asked if she could have his bedroom after he leaves, and another offered to help him pack. I just sat back laughing my ass off, as my little brother's face turned rather pale.

Needless to say, the officer politely declined, and after he left, *everyone* looked at the poor kid like he just screwed up big-time. I offered to take the little guy out back and have a chat with him, and my father agreed (I was 24 at the time); 15 minutes later he was apologizing from the bottom of his very soul (though he still wound up grounded for two months).

Mind you this was in Arkansas, where you were practically allowed to beat your kids to within an inch of their lives if needed, so YMMV.

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