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Comment Re:Re-entry aiming (Score 1) 202

It depends on how bad they are. The world's first ICBM had a high, 5km CEP. But still, plot a 5km circle on any major city, you're still going to hit a densely populated area.

That said, it's quite true that NK's nuclear weapons are (comparatively) quite weak, and (probably) heavy.

Comment Re:dmbasso is a pedophile (Score 3, Insightful) 202

Note to the new owners of Slashdot: this here conversation is precisely the sort of rare case where you should actually get involved (where the person or people involved don't care if they get modded down to zero and will just keep popping back up with more angry, offtopic rants in whatever thread they feel like)

Comment Re:Landfill?! (Score 1) 48

Until it crushes. Not all aerogels are strong, and in the picture we can see the guy bending it. And even the strength of "strong" aerogels is often overstated - they're high strength for their weight, but not for their volume.

Comment Re:Cheaper? (Score 2) 48

I fail to see how it's at all like composite building - it's a moulded product. Also note: frozen and freeze dried for two days. So if you want to make boats out of the stuff, you have to amortize in the cost of two days (per unit) usage of a thermally-regulated vacuum chamber large enough to put a boat in, which is a pretty expensive piece of kit.

Also, how long is the sonication process?

Making boats or surfboards out of the stuff sounds kind of pointless. As you already clearly know, the ideal boat hull is a twinwall composite, where you have composite layers of high tensile fabric bonded to either side of a lightweight foam or honeycomb core - the latter existing primarily to space the former out. If you replace the inner layer with aerogel, you're only cutting out the weight of the foam or honeycomb - and foams and honeycombs are already quite light. I mean, you'd save some weight... but enough to justify the cost and difficulty?

I guess if you're going really upmarket... after all, some people buy Monster cables ;)

Comment Re:fire! (Score 1) 48

Aerogel is of course nothing at all like loose-fill cellulose insulation. But no, it should not pose a fire risk either. Depending on the type, aerogels are generally considered either fire retardant or non-flammable; even if they're made of something that "burns" on a macroscopic level, there's so little "something" there to burn that the flame barrier properties that they provide generally well outweighs the heat output of their own combustion.

Comment Re:don't believe his lies (Score 1) 161

Nope. Doesn't work like this:
1) Flash memory in iPhones is encrypted with a strong random key.
2) The key is contained only in RAM and inside the TPM module that also does fingerprint recognition.
3) The key can be released if the correct PIN is entered. However, the key is irrevocably destroyed by the TPM module if you try more than 6 wrong PINs.

In conclusion, pretty much the only way to unlock a modern iPhone when its owner is dead is to have the fingerprint available.

Comment Re:I don't even know what "hyperloop" is any more. (Score 1) 216

In addition to what bws111 wrote:

Re: the MIT capsule: it's nothing like the Hyperloop Alpha concept (hence my post). SpaceX's test track that they're building is designed to handle a wide variety of vehicles, not just the one laid out in the Hyperloop Alpha concept. IMHO the MIT concept is utterly uninspiring. The drag levels are vastly higher, which are going to ruin pretty much every appealing aspect of the concept.

(but no, the tube has no electromagnets, the MIT design involves induced magnetic fields for propulsion)

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