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Submission + - Is it up to us cure cancer? (

Stolzy writes: I've learned a lot from the Open Source and Creative Commons movements. I also approve of the message of the Libertarian movement teaching self reliance (do no harm to others, take care of yourself and those around you).

For those of us who believe in freedom of information, should we be asking ourselves if we are really the ones responsible for our own welfare?

There's evidence which shows that the drugs Cannabidiol (CBD) and Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) "can" reduce some cancerous growths. And given that big pharma won't support either of these drugs due to issues with low profit, then isn't it up to us to take the next step?

Yesterday I learned that one of my friends has terminal cancer. It frustrated me no end that I couldn't tell her about CBD or DCA because of the fear of raising false hope. She's on Chemotherapy but only to prolong her life, and has no hope of being cured.

If tumorous growths can be controlled and consequently stopped from spreading by cheap drugs such as CBD or DCA, then should we be moving on to "anecdotally evidenced trials" for anyone who has terminal cancer and is willing to give these drugs a go? Patients could keep a diary, written, audial, or visual, and provide the rest of us with evidence of their results.

I'm not suggesting anyone ignore the advice of their Doctor(s), in any way. Either of these drugs can be taken in conjunction with any other treatment(s) being given. But if we continue to ignore the evidence being given to us by our scientific community, then who's the real loser in all of this?

Us, of course. .:DCA: .:CBD:


Submission + - Serious Flaws Detected in Oracle Database, May Lead to Data Leaks (

KristenNicole writes: "Some serious flaws have been identified in older Oracle databases that could lead to data and security breach. As discovered in Oracle Database 11g Releases 1 and 2, the flaw leaves databases open by sending the session key to the client before authentication is fully completed, this leaves the session open to enabling an attacker to guess the password. The Register has reported on this issue and it looks like a bit of a doozy.

Read full article here:"


Submission + - Statistical tools for detecting electoral fraud (

RockDoctor writes: A recent paper published in PNAS describes statistical techniques for clearly displaying the presence of two types of electoral fraud — "incremental fraud" (stuffing of ballot boxes containing genuine votes with ballots for the winning party) and "extreme fraud" (reporting completely contrived numbers, typically 100% turnout for a vote-counting region, with 100% voting for the winning party). While the techniques would require skill with statistical software to apply in real time, the graphs produced in the paper provide tools for the interested non-statistician to monitor an election "live".

Examples are discussed with both "normal" elections, fraud by the techniques mentioned, and cases of genuine voter inhomogeneity.

Other types of fraud, such as gerrymandering and inhibiting the registration of minority voters, are not considered.

The paper is open access, so anyone with the technology to access it can read it.

To restore a sense of reality, I think Walt Disney should have a Hardluckland. -- Jack Paar