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+ - Vibrating bike grips deliver 'handy' directions->

Submitted by conner_bw
conner_bw (120497) writes "The idea is simple, put SmrtGrips on your handlebars, launch the accompanying app to set up the notifications you want and enter your destination in your favorite mapping app. Then, put your phone away and the grips will guide you to the selected address. The right one vibrates when you need to turn right, the left one when you need to go left. The vibrations build in intensity as you near your turn."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Solve this once and for all... (Score 1) 254

by conner_bw (#48532181) Attached to: Node.js Forked By Top Contributors

The original poster makes a valid point which I agree with. That is, other languages have gender built into them and cannot be removed or argued out. Hell, Japanese has hierarchy and ego built into the language (Watashi, bokou, olé). An english centric view of the technical world is limiting, arrogant, and obtuse.

In the context of this specific flamewar, it is appropriate. (American english speaker going overkill on Dutch speaker for reasons far beyond the scope of the incident)

However, your reply, "panties in a bunch" is problematic. Here you imply that the only person who would care about such a stupid problem are women, because they are women? Or cross dressers?

There is IMHO a difference.

Comment: My sense (Score 1) 536

My sense is that the MEAN Stack (Mongo, Express, AngularJS, Node) is sort of winning. There's some packaging of it over at mean.io.

Personally, I'm really getting interested in Meteor (www.meteor.com). Watch the videos, and realize I saw a smart non-coder go from zero to *ridiculously* interactive site design in three months.

Comment: Re:No winners economically (Score 1) 268

by Rayonic (#47288455) Attached to: The EPA Carbon Plan: Coal Loses, But Who Wins?

I have little sympathy for an industry that could have spent the last 40 years reducing their emissions.

Paying for extra emission reduction would put you at a competitive disadvantage against power plants who just did the bare minimum. Or, in a highly regulated environment, it might run you afoul of price controls.

Comment: It's because Python 3 is broken. (Score 2) 432

by Effugas (#45911963) Attached to: Why Do Projects Continue To Support Old Python Releases?
No really.

I took a pass at Python 3 a while back. The amount of hoops I needed to jump through, to deal with compilation errors around Unicode handling, was terrifying. It was simply a poor user experience.

Python 2.7 just works. Sure, it's a nightmare past a certain scale point. But until you get into the dregs of OO it really is executable pseudocode.

Python 3 is some other language that lost that property.

The big problem is that we don't ship languages with telemetry that reports when they fail to work. So things that are completely obvious to outsiders never make it to inner circles. Not that I can really see any way for Python 3 to mend its errors.

+ - Last day to check MIT mail from Open Source Client

Submitted by gessel
gessel (310103) writes "In 2007, MIT began evaluating their email, which was, until today, served by Cyrus IMAP. The committee made some significant errors in failing to understand the FOSS email ecosystem as evidenced by their functionality matrix on slide 18 and settled on Exchange as a replacement. Cyrus access is being terminated today without even enabling Exchange IMAP support, thus completely severing ties with the open source community that began at MIT in 1971."

Comment: Re:Unfriendly Elitists (Score 1) 372

by conner_bw (#45214647) Attached to: Wikipedia's Participation Problem

Yes, elitist, exactly. And, historicaly, not shy to voice it? It's kind of ironic that the man who wants to fix a participation problem that started in 2007, held the opinion that there is no such problem in 2006?

"The idea that a lot of people have of Wikipedia," he noted, "is that it's some emergent phenomenon - the wisdom of mobs, swarm intelligence, that sort of thing - thousands and thousands of individual users each adding a little bit of content and out of this emerges a coherent body of work." But, he (Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia) insisted, the truth was rather different: Wikipedia was actually written by "a community ... a dedicated group of a few hundred volunteers" where "I know all of them and they all know each other". Really, "it's much like any traditional organization."

Source: http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/whowriteswikipedia

"Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward" -- William E. Davidsen

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