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Comment: Re:I'm pleasantly surprised. (Score 1) 277

by Paradise Pete (#47973649) Attached to: Phablet Reviews: Before and After the iPhone 6
Speakign for myself, I would much rather carry around an iPhone 5s, but my eyes are getting worse with age, and now I can't use it without reading glasses. I can't speak for these whippersnappers, but I now welcome the larger screen, and I'm happy that there's a mode that makes what's displayed larger rather than more dense. It sucks getting old, but I suppose that's the goal.

Comment: Re:Coincidence? (Score 1) 236

by Paradise Pete (#47943601) Attached to: Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

if Apple really cared one little bit about their customers

Apple does some odd things, but I can't imagine anyone could watch the Charlie Rose interview of Tim Cook and come away with the impression that he and Apple don't care about their customers. To hold that position you'd have to believe he was a pathological liar and just plain evil.

Comment: Re:See Apple's privacy site for details (Score 1) 236

by Paradise Pete (#47943587) Attached to: Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died
That's a good point. It was in effect being too specific under those "guidelines." So perhaps they were told to remove it, or maybe even some agency issued a throwaway request simply to make it untrue, and thus remove it that way.

I for one am happy that Apple's new strategy to fight this is to continue to minimize the amount of personal information they receive.

Comment: Re:Not completely gone (Score 1) 236

by Paradise Pete (#47943563) Attached to: Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died
I don't think he said that. It wouldn't make any sense, given how email works. With their own Messges platform the encryption is already done on the device before Apple transports the message. With email that is obviously not the case.
Incoming email is normally unencrypted, so there's no way Apple could then encrypt it in a way they couldn't read. And they can't as a matter of course encrypt outgoing email because the receiver wouldn't necessarily be able to decrypt it. So email remains, as it always has been, not a good place at all to hide secrets.

Comment: Re:The protruding lens was a mistake (Score 1) 425

by Paradise Pete (#47925359) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

It really runs contrary to Apple's design sensibility, but I guess we're seeing the first evidence of what happens to Apple without Jobs.

The iPod Touch, created under Jobs' reign, has a protruding lens. Can we stop with the "what would Jobs do" BS? He s dead, it's a different world, and it's a different marketplace.

Comment: Re:The protruding lens was a mistake (Score 1) 425

by Paradise Pete (#47925353) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

Make the phone the thickness of the camera module, adding another 300 mAH to the internal battery and pushing run time another 3 hours,

That adds weight, too. The battery, according lasts well over a day, so not typically an issue, but the weight would always be there.
I have no problem with the protruding lens (It's not their first, the iPod Touch has one), but I think it's shitty that they edit it out of the side-on views.

Comment: Re:Where are these photos? (Score 2) 336

by Paradise Pete (#47803607) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos
Photo Stream is on a one month loop. After that they're gone. They're not recoverable, even if Apple is not actually deleting them for some reason.

The rumor is a brute force password attack through a path that didn't limit attempts. However, it seems unlikely that all these celebs would have guessable passwords and that the attacker would know their Apple ID.

The details that are slowly emerging don't add up so well to an iCould (in particular) breach, but rather it's the emergence of a large collection gathered slowly over time through a multitude of sources and devices and techniques.

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