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Comment Re:Can't Carbon be nuclear? (Score 1) 235

Details matter. You are looking to build a fusion reactor, and this reaction is far more difficult than the DT reaction that the fusion community is focusing on.

They're also working on the substantially harder p-B reaction (which only has a trace of neutron output due to impurities/side reactions). That's substantially harder (and worth it!) but still not in the ballpark.

Comment Re:Linux gadget. (Score 1) 92

The answer appears to be no on the rPi. The BCM2835's USB port is OTG-capable, so it isn't master only; but I can find no mention of gadget device configuration actually being available. The CHIP is maybe: apparently OTG support was added in kernel 4.3; don't know how well it works, or whether the CHIP's mini-b port even has its data lines connected.

Comment Re:Is C.H.I.P. really sub-10$? (Score 1) 92

Whether or not they can actually keep the CHIP at $9, if the project does actually get Allwinner SoC support mainline and GPL compliant it would be a fairly big win. All kinds of low cost hardware is built on Allwinner parts; but the software situation is kind of dodgy, since Allwinner doesn't seem to care and the people making hardware cheap enough to use Allwinner SoCs really don't care.

With Rockchip and Mediatek in play, it's not as though they have a whole lot of room for 'mwahaha, loss leader and then suck the captive audience dry!' mustache-twirling, because the audience just isn't that captive and their parts aren't terribly special, though competent enough. It's hard to see any attempt on their part to make them more accessible as a bad thing, whether or not the intro pricing can be sustained.

Comment Missing the point a bit? (Score 3, Insightful) 92

While it is extremely impressive that one could do so(given that such power for such price was unheard of until very recently), it seems rather pointless to compare these two boards on the basis that you are planning on plugging in enough peripherals to use them as your next desktop. Aside from the plummeting cost and wide availability of ludicrously overqualified x86s; the most stripped down ARM SBC is obviously going to require costlier and uglier peripheral tangles than the less stripped down ones(the CHIP has no 'sibling' designs; but is similar to Allwinner-based boards from others; the rPi zero has otherwise-identical models that add the USB hub and ethernet for you, or slightly punchier options).

The only reason to go with either of these is because you have some more constrained purpose for which the low cost and small size make the difference. So, do you want HDMI support; at the cost of bringing your own NIC; or do you want the NIC; but HDMI as an optional extra? Depends on whether you are building a headless project or not.

The other matter is the software support; which is as yet an unknown. The rPi has some Broadcom blobs that are very, very, unlikely to go away; but benefits from a known, solid, supporting ecosystem. The Allwinner A8 is a bit of an unknown quantity: the project claims to be aggressively mainlining everything(which would be extremely attractive); but Allwinner's GPL compliance has best in the past; and the MALI-400 is ARM's toy, not theirs, so they have limited control over that. If the CHIP's aspirations bear out, then it will have the distinct advantage of working with mainline kernel and u-boot. If they don't, or do only in part, then the question becomes one of 'which slightly oddball BSP is better?'

Comment Re: Getting a car repair (Score 1) 470

Brake fluid is clear to brown and slick (in my car it's clear).
Power steering is reddish or light brown and thin (in my car it is reddish).
Transmission fluid is reddish or magenta and smells sweet
Oil is amber.

I tell the service rep what happened before and that I'll be checking before I leave the lot. (this is the most important part)
When done, I get the service rep and we pop the hood and check each of the fluids to make sure they look/smell/feel right (this is less important since the car is probably screwed at this point anyway).
"They design the rubber used in the braking system for high pressure sealing. Manufacturers also design this type of rubber for use only with brake fluid. Severe damage results from even the smallest amount of petroleum-based fluid added to the brake system. Oil-based fluid causes the rubber in the braking system to swell and very rapidly deteriorate.

The most common mistake is adding power steering fluid to the brakes*

power steering fluid will swell and deteriorate brake seals
Power steering fluid contamination will cause seals to immediately begin swelling. As the seals swell, they move forward and block the passages that allow the brake system to function. One example is the return ports in the brake master-cylinder. The swollen seal blocks this port and the return of fluid to the reservoir, when we release the brake pedal. "

* this is what happened to me.

Comment Re:Or just make the diesels hybrids (Score 2) 179

And even the best public transport system generally isnt going to start and stop *exactly* where you need it, so there still is going to be *some* walking. Which some people with disabilities or health problems simply can't manage. And to achieve a good public transport system - with frequent stops, densely placed stops, relatively direct routes and affordable prices - is entirely dependent on population density far more than it is on "will". In places with high density, it's a relatively straightforward process to have a good public transport system. In places with moderate to low density, it can be difficult to nearly impossible. And weaknesses in public transport system are a viscious cycle: the less frequent the stops, the further spaced out they are, the longer the transit times, and the more expensive the rides - the fewer people will ride them. The fewer that ride the less frequent you have to have the stops, the further apart they need to be, the less direct the routes, and the less affordable the prices.

Comment Re:What's the point? (Score 1) 149

Why would someone eat something that contains almost no nourishment

To enjoy the pleasure of food without contributing as much to obesity? cf. the entire diet-foods industry.

That said, I've had some of these yam-like noodle products, and the ones I got tasted like hell and digested even worse. Hopefully a large dose of cellulose can fix that. I'd love to have some chee cheong fun with the majority of calories coming from the sauce and meats!

You need either carbs or fat just to survive.

Or protein.

Comment Re:Disposable screens for disposable products? (Score 1) 202

Your old OLED screens don't compare to modern OLED displays - they're at least two generations behind. And black bars? That's the controller, not the 'phosphors'. It could be that a certain OLED panel had a bad production run, but try to keep proper separation of concerns.

A 4-year-old GS3 AMOLED screen looks great compared to any iPhone screen produced today, and the newer ones are even better (I considered switching to a 'better' phone (circuit-board level) after running a GS4 for years, and just couldn't go back to LED). Apple is switching to better technology obviously (and good for them).

Most importantly, the iPhone OLED screen will last longer than security updates will be available for the device. Be a responsible netizen and recycle the thing in 2023. Or go with an open product instead to extend the safe lifetime of your purchase.

Comment C vs Pascal == Perl vs Python (Score 2, Interesting) 129

I remember despising C for its absurd syntax ("==", "!=" etc.).
I still do.

And I was the opposite, I despised the vebosity of pascal (begin/end/etc.) and it's tendency to try to hide some low level details on the grounds of making it easier to learn.
To each his own preferences.

That's a definitive proof that the Perl vs Python debate didn't actually need theese language and the whole concept dates back much further in computing history.

Thus spake the master programmer: "Time for you to leave." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"