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Comment Re:that's great but... (Score 1) 432

That is why we have whats called "spinning reserve". It does not necessarily mean you have reserve generators spinning all the time, it can also refer to any backup or reserve power source that can be bought on line within ten minutes notice. This is how they compensate for generator down time whether planned or unplanned. It also is used to help absorb very heavy industrial loads, some of which are tens or hundreds of megawatts. Steel mills and Aluminum plants use enormous amounts of energy, some well over a hundred million watts (arc furnaces can themselves consume over 100 megawatts.) I have even heard of an electrical motor used to drive the fan of an extremely large wind tunnel consume 44 megawatts. And you just cant turn them on, you have to call the utility and tell them to are so the can switch on the spinning reserve if necessary. This ensures there is enough power for the plant and for the grid.

And as for why they leave generators spinning is simple. It is a very time consuming process to stop a high pressure steam turbine to bring it off line. To stop one you have to gradually slow it down and then gradually cool it down. Then you have to purge the water from it that condensed otherwise it will destroy the turbine blades on start up. Then to start it you need to slowly heat it up and then speed it up while making sure no water is present. So to make life easy and keep the reserve ready at a moments notice they lust let them run with no load. They are only stopped for repair and maintenance.

I am not saying you cant have spinning reserve with renewable energy.It just not possible to do it with the most popular forms such as wind and solar. No wind or sun light = no spinning reserve. You could use batteries but how economical is that and do we want buildings full of toxic lead, acids or other hazardous metals? That many batteries will need allot of maintenance. And there will need to be a rotation system as battery banks wear out with time so you must be sure your battery banks can be ready to handle a load. Other methods of reserve are stored water reservoirs but how easy are they to build and what about towns or cities that are on and surrounded by relatively flat land?

Most of the power generated in the world comes from high output plants that use a fuel source to boil water. Its going to be a while before we find something that can be able to handle: high base loads, provide "spinning reserve" and that fit into relatively small spaces and are economical to build and maintain. Until then wind and solar are great supplements and will help curb some emissions, but not eliminate them.

Comment Re:Clueless about testing... (Score 1) 164

First of all, I didn't mean to equate usability Testing with UAT

From your parent post

Beta = feature complete + usability testing (UAT)..

Either your English is terrible or you really meant that.

In either case you shouldn't be a dick when you're clearly in the wrong and back-pedalling. You could have done something as mature as thanked the AC for correcting your mistake. Personally I hate people who confuse UAT with other forms of testing, this in my experience normally comes from uninformed or inexperienced developers.

UAT is done with finished products, in the case of software a release candidate. Feature complete does not imply it is a release candidate, it just implies that the developer has stopped adding features and is focusing on fixing bugs/problems (a good thing(TM), and I wish software developers and engineers would actually do this more often). UAT is one of the last tests done with software, so it is definitely not in the beta stage. UAT is acceptance testing not usability testing, usability testing should have been completed long before acceptance testing. If you're up to UAT, you should be done making any changes and confident that your product is fit to be released to the client.

Comment Re:I'm conflicted (Score 1) 980

about when they suddenly dropped their 64-bit Cocoa plans despite their earlier promise to Adobe that they'd have a migration path which wouldn't require a complete rewrite.

Cocoa is 64-bit, you mean Carbon. And they did have a migration path. Since 10.2, they've made it easier and easier to combine Cocoa and Carbon in the same app. They unified the event models, added HICocoaView to embed Cocoa views in Carbon apps, and so on. You can very easily do an incremental rewrite of a Carbon app. If Adobe had begun in 2002, when Apple started to make it clear that Cocoa was the API for future development and Carbon was the API for porting legacy apps, then they'd have a fully Cocoa app by now.

Comment Re:Obvious Question (Score 1) 370

Um, Do you mean this?

If so, no, The LM2 is now on display in the Bremenhalle exhibition in the Bremen Airport of Bremen, Germany. the rest are equally deployed, since their mission has been replaced by Columbus, Harmony and Tranquility modules of the International Space Station.

Comment FGC (Score 1) 356

I tried using Songbird on OS X and tried to help a little. I submitted a few bugs and tried building it a few times, once or twice successfully. In the end, I found it to be bloated, buggy, and unusable. I thought about "contributing" (fixing things), but when I looked at the so-called architecture (using a browser framework to implement a media player?!), I gagged, uninstalled Songbird, and never looked back.

I think of things like this as Fucking Gothic Cathedrals (FGCs). The equivalent C/C++ code would probably run in 10% of its footprint and at 5000% of its performance. Maybe I'm behind the times, but the idea of doing everything inside a browser seems stupid to me. Just saying.

Comment Re:This is why I love competition (Score 0, Flamebait) 77

When iPhone came on board with games, etc, I knew there will be potentially improved products from Nintendo and eventually Sony/Microsoft.

So Nintendo is only innovating their handheld because of competition from the iPhone? What about the Game Boy Color, Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Advance SP, Game Boy Pocket, Game Boy Light, Game Boy Micro, DS, DS Lite, DSi, DS XL....?

Comment Re:then are they going to internet connection (Score 3, Informative) 313


Er... you can get ADSL broadband for £6 (around $9) a month. That's (up to) 8Mb/s with a 10GB cap.

Perhaps your friend is very, very hard up, but although the UK doesn't have the cheapest broadband in the world, it's really not that bad, either. I think it compares reasonably well with the US.

The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was.