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Submission + - Chilean Start-up Prints First Mind-Designed Object 1

seanellis writes: Chilean start-up Thinker Thing has delivered on its promise, and has announced the first real object designed by pure thought. Using an evolutionary algorithm guided by emotional feedback, Thinker Thing's goal is to allow the creation of designs without having to first learn a craft to make them. Their current project is to allow schoolchildren to design toy monsters, which are ideal experimental objects as they are very flexible and emotionally charged.

Submission + - 450 Million Lines Of Scanned Software Code Can't Be Wrong (drdobbs.com)

CowboyRobot writes: The 2012 Coverity Scan Open Source Report details the analysis of more than 450 million lines of software code. Key findings this year suggest that code quality for open source software continues to mirror that of proprietary software. Defect density (defects per 1,000 lines of software code) is a commonly used measurement for software quality. Coverity's analysis found an average defect density of .69 for open source software projects that leverage the firm's own scan service. It also found an average defect density of .68 for proprietary code developed by the firm's own enterprise customers. Both have better quality as compared to the accepted industry standard defect density for good quality software of 1.0.

Submission + - 10 things you may not know about Ethernet (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: Ethernet's value to networking and IT is well established over the past 40 years. But did you know that "Ethernet" refers to two slightly different ways of sending information between endpoints on a LAN? That and some other perhaps lesser known facts about this 40-year-old technology.

Submission + - Oracle Ships Java 7 Update 11 With Vulnerability Fixes

An anonymous reader writes: After announcing a fix was coming just yesterday, Oracle on Sunday released Java 7 Update 11 to address the recently disclosed security vulnerability. If you use Java, you can download the latest update now from the Java Control Panel or directly from Oracle’s website here: Java SE 7u11. In the release notes for this update, Oracle notes this version "contains fixes for security vulnerabilities." A closer look at Oracle Security Alert for CVE-2013-0422 details that Update 11 fixes two vulnerabilities.

Submission + - US Deserves Transparency From Oil Refineries

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Gregg Laskoski writes in US News and World Report that virtually all of the retail gasoline price volatility that Americans experienced this past year was connected to significant problems at refineries and it was those refineries' vulnerability that subjected US consumers to the year's highest average price ever, $3.63 per gallon. February delivered the BP refinery fire in Cherry Point, Washington that led to gasoline price spikes all along the Pacific coast, refinery problems in the Great Lakes region pushed Chicago gas prices to an all-time high of $4.56 per gallon, and over the summer, west coast refineries incurred outages, and California saw record highs in most markets, with Los Angeles gasoline's average price peaking at $4.72/gallon in October. Finally after Reuters reported that some 7,700 gallons of fuel spilled from Phillips 66's Bayway refinery in Linden, NJ, after Hurricane Sandy, New Jersey environmental protection officials said they were not made aware of a major spill at the Bayway plant, and the refinery failed to respond to inquiries from Reuters reporters. "Too many times, history has shown us, the Phillips 66 response or lack thereof characterizes the standard practice of the oil industry. Refineries often fail or are slow to communicate problems that create significant disruptions to fuel supplies and spikes in retail gasoline prices. More often than not, scant information is provided reluctantly, if at all," writes Laskoski. "When such things occur is silence from refineries acceptable? Or does our government and the electorate who put them there have a right to know what's really going on?""
Internet Explorer

Submission + - MS funded study says forcing users upon IE cuts costs (zdnet.com)

Billly Gates writes: Microsoft and its browser are under more threat than ever. Not only are consumers no longer willing to use their outdated browser. We are starting to see corporations warm up as well. Many have BYOD and offer Firefox as well. A supposedly independent study that somehow is linked in Microsoft's website is being touted as a way to reduce costs. One standard, one OS, one browser, at one version ensures maximum security and functionality with less malware and viruses. This sounds somewhat familiar like we heard this before? I am sure as 2014 approaches that those 10 years ago who thought like this with their web apps thought what could possible go wrong!

Submission + - What Does Google Get Out Of Voice? (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Assuming Google isn't offering Voice out of the goodness of their hearts,what's the payoff? One likely, if cynical, possibility is that Google Voice is 'just another feeder for their vast database on you,' writes Kevin Purdy in a recent plog post. Or maybe Google just wants to get better at speech-to-text, and collecting your voice messages are just one big voice mining effort. 'They already did it with GOOG-411, the free phone directory service that mined voices across the country to launch Google Voice’s current transcription offering,' says Purdy. For its part, Google says it has no plans to monetize Voice beyond the international calling and number porting fees that it currently charges."

Submission + - SPAM: American youth care less about stroke : Survey | S

trustsquaremedia writes: "In the research about 1,250 adults between the ages of 18 to 44 year were taken into account. They were asked about their outlook on healthy behavior and the risk of a stroke. The survey found that only 43 percent of the adults between the age of 18 to 43 are worried about the risk of stroke and any other heart disease."
Link to Original Source
Open Source

Submission + - Core devs discuss PostgreSQL's future (cio.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "The release of the first beta of version 9.1 of the open source PostgreSQL database has opened a new era in enterprise-class reliability and data integrity that can compete with the big names, say its developers. CIO Australia interviewed Josh Berkus, Kevin Grittner, Dimitri Fontaine and Robert Haas about PostgreSQL 9.1 and its future."

Pascal is a language for children wanting to be naughty. -- Dr. Kasi Ananthanarayanan