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Submission + - Superliminal neutrinos refuted by ICARUS (

TaeKwonDood writes: The superluminal neutrinos hysteria has been refuted — by people who know what they are talking about, not kooky theorists. ICARUS, another neutrino experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratories, has looked at the neutrinos shot from CERN since 2010 to verify results in the article recently published by Cohen and Glashow a few weeks ago.

Also, apparently physicists eat a lot of donuts during meetings.


Submission + - Inside BEAST: The SSL/TLS Exploit In-Depth (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Roger Grimes provides an in-depth look at BEAST, the recently revealed exploit that compromises SSL and TLS browser connections. 'BEAST uses JavaScript running in a victim's Web browser to initiate many different encrypted data blocks, each time knowing the IV and the plaintext that is being encrypted (in an appropriately designed encryption system, neither of these conditions should be possible as it gives the attacker far too much known information to crib from). This is known as a "block-wise adaptive chosen plaintext attack." This attack was first theorized against SSL/TLS in 2006 by Gregory V. Bard. It led to the formation of TLS 1.1 and is implemented in OpenSSL 0.9.6d and later. Unfortunately, TLS 1.1 and 1.2 versions are not enforced anywhere by default — and to be effective, all other previous HTTPS protocols must be disallowed by at least one side of the connection. Most HTTPS-protected websites will probably not upgrade to TLS 1.1 or 1.2 for some time; if you upgrade your browser to TLS 1.1 and disallow any other type of connection, you will not be able to establish connections to most HTTPS hosts.'"

Submission + - FTL Neutrinos because of FPGA? (

cobrausn writes: However if I must be dubious about one element, it would be this FPGA-based platform, which sits at the Gran Sasso site, processing the trigger and clock signals. Given the information released publicly, (1) it is the most complex device in the timing chain, (2) contrary to other timing equipment which is off-the-shelf, this system appears to be a custom design of which no precise details were given, and (3) as Dario Autiero said himself, it is rare that particle physicists need such accurate time, which makes me think they may have overlooked certain details when designing it.

Submission + - Incandescents use less energy, CFLs an elaborate c ( 2

bluefoxlucid writes: From the article, "BANNING the humble 60-watt light bulb to make way for so-called energy-saving ones and 'help save the planet' was last night exposed as an elaborate EU con." What justification could the have for such accusations? "The carbon footprint of manufacturing, distribution and disposal of a compact fluorescent bulb is far greater than the energy usage of a standard bulb." Imagine that. Complex electronics and mercury tubes are harder to make than an evacuated glass bulb with a wire in it; and reclaiming hazardous waste takes more energy than just chucking a harmless glass bulb in the standard recycling bin.

Submission + - Bulletproofing Laptop Security (

snydeq writes: "InfoWorld's Serdar Yegulalp offers tips, tools, and techniques to protect Windows notebooks against theft, intrusion, and data loss. 'Some involve hardware (fingerprint readers), some involve software (Prey, TrueCrypt), and some involve nothing more than using your head (strong passwords). Not all of them might be implemented on a given machine, but the more layers of each kind of security you can add, the better.'"

Submission + - Ex-Board Member: HP Committing Corporate Suicide 1

theodp writes: If Apple's looking for a seamless transition, advises the NYT's James B. Stewart, it definitely shouldn't look to Hewlett Packard. In the year after HP CEO Mark Hurd was told to hit-the-road-Jack, HP — led by new CEO Leo Apotheker — has embarked on a stunning shift in strategy that has left many baffled and resulted in HP's fall from Wall Street grace (its stock declined 49%). The apparent new focus on going head-to-head with SAP (Apotheker's former employer) and Oracle (Hurd's new employer) in enterprise software while ignoring the company's traditional strengths, said a software exec, is 'as if Alan Mulally left Boeing to join Ford as CEO, and announced six months later that Ford would be making airplanes.' Former HP Director Tom Perkins said, 'I didn't know there was such a thing as corporate suicide, but now we know that there is.' A year ago, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison fired off an e-mail to the NY Times calling buddy Hurd's ouster 'the worst personnel decision since the idiots on the Apple board fired Steve Jobs.' Most dismissed Ellison's rant as hyperbole at the time, writes Stewart, but now many aren't so sure.

Submission + - Guitar Makers and Owners Under The Gun. (

tetrahedrassface writes: According to the Wall Street Journal, Federal agents again raided guitar maker Gibson this past week seizing several pallets of wood and computer documents. At heart of the issue is the wood that is being used in guitars and whether or not it comes from sustainable sources. The company insists it is being harassed and made to 'cry uncle' to the governments enforcement laws. While, as the article notes, wonderful woods like Madagascar Ebony, Brazilian Rosewood and other fret and tone woods are protected in order to prevent the equivalent of 'blood diamond like trade' in sought after tone woods, the ramafications now extend to guitar sowners. Owners and players are next in sights of this enforcement. If you play a vintage guitar, or a hand built guitar made of old stock woods that were legally obtained years ago, but only recently crafted into an ax, you best not fly with it. John Thomas, a law professor at Quinnipiac University and a blues and ragtime guitarist, says "there's a lot of anxiety, and it's well justified." Once upon a time, he would have taken one of his vintage guitars on his travels. Now, "I don't go out of the country with a wooden guitar." That's right. Recent revisions to various laws and the Lacey Act mean if you carry your guitar across the border and don't have your paperwork and certification in hand, they will seize the guitar and fine you 250.00. So if your planning that dream vacation to France and want to play your acoustic in the air of France (or anywhere else) be forewarned. They are gunning for you.

Submission + - Reactions To Google's Motorola Acquisition (

bonch writes: Pundits have been analyzing the Motorola acquisition since its announcement, and Dan Lyons, formerly known as Fake Steve Jobs, says Google never cared for the Nortel patents and that they drove the bidding price up intentionally while negotiating to buy Motorola, an idea questioned by MG Siegler who believes buying Motorola for $12.5 billion--almost two years' worth of Google's annual profits--is an act of desperation. John Gruber notes that Motorola was threatening to wage a patent war against other Android partners during the time they would have been negotiating with Google and that Motorola likely forced them into an expensive buyout rather than a patent license agreement. Google may have also been motivated by the fact that Microsoft was pursuing a Motorola buyout.

Submission + - Can we fix SSL Certification? (

Em Adespoton writes: "At DEFCON this year, Moxie Marlinspike gave an excellent presentation entitled "SSL And The Future Of Authenticity." It shows how broken the current SSL certification model is, and proposes a replacement. Naked Security adds to the issue, pointing out that with Moxie's method, does it even matter if you can trust your certificate notaries?
What do you think?"


Submission + - Was .NET all a mistake? (

mikejuk writes: The recent unsettling behavior at Microsoft concerning .NET makes it a good time to re-evaluate what the technology is all about. It may have been good technology but with the systems guys building Windows prefering to stick with C++ the outcome was inevitable. Because they failed to support its way of doing things .NET has always been a second class Windows citizen unable to make direct use of the Windows APIs — especially the latest. .NET started out as Microsoft's best challenge to Java but now you have to ask what has the excursion into managed code brought the Microsoft programmer and indeed what good has it done Microsoft? From where we are now it begins to look very much like an unnecessary forced detour and Windows programmers are going to be living with the mess for years to come.

God is real, unless declared integer.