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Microsoft

Microsoft .Net Libraries Not Acting "Open Source" 246

Posted by kdawson
from the promises-broken-or-forgotten dept.
figleaf writes "Three years ago, with much fanfare, Microsoft announced it would make some of the .Net libraries open source using the Microsoft Reference License. Since then Microsoft has reneged on its promise. The reference code site is dead, the blog hasn't been updated in a year and a half, and no one from Microsoft responds to questions on the forum."
Image

Man Uses Remote Logon To Help Find Laptop Thief 251 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the cyber-bloodhound dept.
After his computer was stolen, Jose Caceres used a remote access program to log on every day and watch it being used. The laptop was stolen on Sept. 4, when he left it on top of his car while carrying other things into his home. "It was kind of frustrating because he was mostly using it to watch porn," Caceres said. "I couldn't get any information about him." Last week the thief messed up and registered on a web site with his name and address. Jose alerted the police, who arrested a suspect a few hours later. The moral of the story: never go to a porn site where you have to register.

Comment: Re:ehh.. (Score 1) 554

by Ours (#24878977) Attached to: Blu-ray Gone In Five Years, Samsung Claims
I think physical media support will die. Why put movies on another medium when you can send them from the net to the client? The only storage needed is the current super big, super cheap hard drives on the provider side and on the client side. This is not sci-fi. A French buddy of mine has cheap ass broadband (20 mb) with phone and HDTV and for something like 8 bucks a month he gets to watch up to 6 full HD movies on demand. It's so cheap and easy that he's preferring that to the usual torrents he used to get movies.
Toys

+ - Trolltech cancels Greenphone

Submitted by twilight30
twilight30 (84644) writes "From ZDNet: 'The mobile Linux development company Trolltech says that it has sold out of its Greenphone reference handsets and that it will not reorder further units, because there are now suitable alternatives in the marketplace. Trolltech launched the Greenphone in 2006, the first fully open handset designed for the development of open-source applications. Running on Trolltech's Qtopia platform, the device was supposed to stimulate the growth of mobile Linux'"
Biotech

Germs Taken Into Space May Come Back Deadlier 137

Posted by Zonk
from the just-what-we-need-down-here dept.
westlake writes "Sounds like the plot for a B-movie, doesn't it? Germs go into space and come back stronger and deadlier than ever. Except, it really happened. In a medical experiment, salmonella carried about the space shuttle in the fall of 2006 proved far more lethal to lab mice than their earth-bound source. 90% dead vs. 60% dead in twenty-six days, with half the mice dying at 1/3 the oral dose. Apparently 167 genes in the space-evolved strain had changed. The likely cause: In microgravity the force of fluids passing over the cells is low, similar to conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, and the cells adapted quickly to the new environment."
Encryption

+ - Australia cracked US combat aircraft codes->

Submitted by SpamSlapper
SpamSlapper (162584) writes "FORMER defence minister Kim Beazley has told how Australia cracked top-secret American combat aircraft codes to enable the shooting down of enemy aircraft in the 1980s. The radar on Australia's Hornets could not identify most potentially hostile aircraft in the region, but dispite many requests, the codes were not provided, so "In the end we spied on them and we extracted the codes ourselves". The Americans knew what the Australians were doing and were intrigued by the progress they made."
Link to Original Source
The Courts

P2P File Sharing Ruining Physical Piracy Business 192

Posted by Zonk
from the innovate-or-die dept.
TorrentFreak has a short post up talking with a former physical data pirate, who sold his wares in flea markets and made buckets of money in the 90s. By the end of the last decade, his money flow had dried up, and he places the blame squarely on the shoulders of P2P file sharing. "Tony is very clear about why his rags to riches story has gone back to rags again. 'File-sharing, P2P - call it what you like. When you asked a customer why he wasn't buying anything, 9 times out of 10 it was BitTorrent this, LimeWire that ...' P2P is a very powerful machine and although Tony could see that his operation was feeling its effects, he admits that he sat back and did nothing about it and consequently, his business has paid the ultimate price. Other industries affected by P2P should take note: Don't be a Tony. Overhaul your business model. Quickly." One would imagine overseas media sellers will have similar issues, as P2P networks become more common outside of the Western world.

Australia Wants to Regulate Internet Streaming 257

Posted by samzenpus
from the what-you-streaming-mate dept.
Paul writes "After an incident that occurred on a popular television show's internet stream, the Australian government has once again demonstrated that it simply does not understand the internet by indicating that they intend to regulate streaming video. I wonder what these geniuses plan on doing with porn streamed from Europe?"

Researchers Make Gasoline From Cow Dung 201

Posted by Zonk
from the something-stinks-about-this dept.
McDrewbie writes "Yahoo! News has an article about Japanese researchers extracting a small amount of gasoline from 3.5oz of cow dung. The process uses application of high heat and pressure. Hopefully, when more information is released, we can find out how much energy it takes to produce this gasoline and how energy efficient the process is."

Teenage Blogger Finds Gmail Hole 268

Posted by Zonk
from the not-what-i-was-doing-at-14 dept.
cpm80 wrote to mention the news that a 14 year old blogger has identified a security hole in the Gmail webmail service. From the Network World article: "He wrote that he was trying to e-mail JavaScript code from a Yahoo account to a G-mail account. The code will run in a preview pane, he wrote. But if the code is mailed from one Gmail account to another, it is filtered out, he said. Some visitors to the blog reported being able to replicate the findings, but others said later that they were not able to and that the supposed flaw had been fixed."

The Impact of Violent Gaming 421

Posted by Zonk
from the toad-sure-is-a-rebel dept.
An anonymous reader writes "IGN has an article up looking at the impact of violent videogames. It discusses some of the rationale on the gaming industry side for having violent images in their games, and the reactions from politics and lawmakers to these games." From the article: "Despite the large body of evidence that supports a link between playing violent videogames and aggression, lawmakers still have a difficult time convincing the courts that they should be removed from children's hands. One of the reasons for this is that most of the work done is correlational studies which look for a link between two factors. That is, if we see an increase in violent videogame play, is there also an increase in violent behavior?"

Octopiler to Ease Use of Cell Processor 423

Posted by Zonk
from the ps3-where-are-you dept.
Sean0michael writes "Ars Technica is running a piece about The Octopiler from IBM. The Octopiler is supposed to be compiler designed to handle the Cell processor (the one inside Sony's PS3). From the article: 'Cell's greatest strength is that there's a lot of hardware on that chip. And Cell's greatest weakness is that there's a lot of hardware on that chip. So Cell has immense performance potential, but if you want to make it programable by mere mortals then you need a compiler that can ingest code written in a high-level language and produce optimized binaries that fit not just a programming model or a microarchitecture, but an entire multiprocessor system.' The article also has several links to some technical information released by IBM."

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