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Comment: Re:Minimalism Overkill (Score 1) 305

by OscarGunther (#48169193) Attached to: OS X 10.10 Yosemite Review

Adding chrome to a design is only more effort in the sense that you have to spend a lot of time adding that chrome. Otherwise, minimalism is at least just as hard because your intent and functionality can't hide behind the pretty blinking lights.

How does Fallingwater reflect a decline in society when compared to Versailles?

Comment: Summary for the time-constrained (Score 2) 164

I actually listened to the whole thing (and that's a few minutes of my life I wish to have back) and he seems to be focused on scripting languages -- PERL, Javascript, PHP, etc. I'll save you a few minutes: he wants us all to focus our dev efforts on only those language features that are common across his in-scope languages. Further, once you've written something in your favorite scripting language, you should port that "gift" to the other in-scope languages to give your "gift" the widest possible distribution.

In short, Acmeism consists of a quintupling of your workload by asking you to port everything you write multiple times. The whole language evangelism thing apparently bugs him and he's opting out.

Comment: Re:Well, (Score 1) 343

by OscarGunther (#44168949) Attached to: Steve Ballmer Replaces Don Mattrick As Xbox One Chief

I think they don't have a replacement yet, but will replace him eventually. Per TFA, Ballmer isn't the guy the board wants in front of gamers. It's standard operating procedure in cases such as these that the direct reports to a defenestrated department head report to *his* boss until a new department head is found. This also suggests to me that Mattrick was pushed (or jumped before he could be pushed) because of the massive black eye Microsoft suffered. As much as we all enjoy the chair jokes at his expense, I don't expect Ballmer to have direct responsibility for the gaming division for long.

Comment: None, you insensitive clod! (Score 1) 219

by OscarGunther (#38506126) Attached to: My favorite New Year to observe:

I don't celebrate the New Year because (1) I don't need an excuse to party/drink and (2) there's nothing so particularly special about incrementing the digit on a calendar that it requires a huge celebration. I'll celebrate a birthday because that's a personal expression of regard for someone you know and care about, but the New Year is highly impersonal.

Love the fireworks, though. We need more excuses to

Comment: Re:How does this differ from Truecrypt? (Score 2, Informative) 252

by OscarGunther (#30658828) Attached to: Encryption Cracked On NIST-Certified Flash Drives

Assuming your last comment wasn't a rhetorical question, you already know the answer to this: Because the perceived value-add of selling an encrypted drive allows them to charge more than simply bundling TrueCrypt with a bog-standard USB drive. The public justification would be that their software is easier to use (and, if they're feeling particularly full of themselves, more secure).

Comment: Not forced, but decision is important (Score 1) 410

by OscarGunther (#30368218) Attached to: Saying No To Promotions Away From Tech?

I moved from a technical a more administrative role because it was the natural progression in the career path I've chosen. So one consideration for you is if you have a future in mind that requires a steady upward progression through the organizational hierarchy. Another consideration is how management would view a declination of additional responsibility. I've had some managers who were perfectly OK with having someone stop at a chosen point; others (in the same company) want only--or primarily--upwardly mobile people working for them.

Is the increased responsibility and availability sufficiently compensated? Will you be comfortable managing those who were until recently your peers? Other considerations aside--from a purely avocational perspective--which would you rather do: your current job or the one being offered?

Comment: Re:Disney sells product that solves Disney's probl (Score 3, Insightful) 498

by OscarGunther (#29827717) Attached to: Disney Close To Unveiling New "DVD Killer"
I saw the WSJ article on this. The only thing it solves is the problem of storing large media files on low-capacity hardware. In all other respects, it's an industry solution in search of a consumer problem. Given a comprehensive set of easily-followed instructions on how to convert and load media files on different platforms (PCs, phones, etc.), this "solution" solves nothing for me. If I'm sufficiently technically savvy to convert a movie so it will play on my iPod, why do I need this?

Comment: Old news, surely (Score 2, Interesting) 241

by OscarGunther (#29086009) Attached to: Comcast Seeking Control of Both Pipes and Content?

They've already tried to purchase Disney once before, as I recall. I think there's no question of anti-trust on this; we're talking a straightforward attempt at vertical integration within an industry. Comcast can even argue that Time Warner and Viacom have already set precedents for the acceptability of such a merger and that, in fact, Comcast needs to do such a deal to remain competitive.

Communications

+ - SC considers wireless net as public service

Submitted by
jeffery_donahue
jeffery_donahue writes "According to The Lancaster News, the legislature of South Carolina is considering offering municipal wireless internet throughout the state. "The state House recently passed a resolution creating the S.C. Wireless Technology and Communications Commission, which will study the feasibility of creating a statewide wireless broadband network using existing ETV towers." Also among the topics of debate is the matter of a virtual classroom."

There is nothing so easy but that it becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly. -- Publius Terentius Afer (Terence)

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