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Comment: Re:Answer (Score 1) 323

by Alioth (#49789235) Attached to: How Much C++ Should You Know For an Entry-Level C++ Job?

Long ago, after writing C++ like Java, I decided it would be much easier and I would be much more productive if I just actually used Java. Many headaches of trying to write C++ like Java go away if you just use Java (or C# instead) and you get easier to understand and easier to maintain software systems.

Comment: Re:Blocking access (Score 1) 253

by Cyberdyne (#49773453) Attached to: Leaked Document Shows Europe Would Fight UK Plans To Block Porn

Easy. You call up the US vendor that sold China their Great Firewall and order another one. This one will be cheap, considering the UK's population is a fraction that of China.

Already done: TalkTalk (arguably the UK's worst ISP in general, as well as being the first to jump on the government's bandwagon) spent many millions of pounds (described in a related court case as "an eight figure sum") importing a horribly flawed censorship system from Huawei, which is one of the Chinese manufacturers of part of the Great Firewall.

A few principled UK ISPs are standing up to censorship, and still offering unfiltered services - though I do fear Cameron will attack them for it now: like most bullies, he can't handle criticism or opposition.

Comment: Re:*shrug* (Score 1) 386

by Alioth (#49757337) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

So did the Acorn Archimedes (the computer the ARM CPU was originally made for). RiscOS even had things like anti-aliased fonts by then, and certain user interface concepts that didn't show up elsewhere until Mac OSX came out.

However, the PC and Microsoft was already massively entrenched, and the news was huge - finally the computers most people actually used at work were going to catch up with the Mac, Amiga, Archimedes and other machines.

Comment: Re: *shrug* (Score 1) 386

by Alioth (#49757327) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

But anyone could tell that Windows was going to be huge. The PC was already dominant and Microsoft was already nearing monopoly position in the PC market (and IBM compatibles at the time had fallen in price such that they were price competitive with the Amiga) and the upgrade path for most people was not to buy a whole new computer but just add Windows.

I remember the news at the time. It was huge. Finally, the PC that nearly everyone was using was catching up to the Mac, Archimedes, Amiga etc.

Comment: Re:Curious... (Score 1) 1091

by Alioth (#49734451) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

Raising minimum wage *past a certain point* won't help anyone. If you've ever done basic calculus you will have come across the concept of oprimization - in the abstract for instance, finding where the derivative of a function that's some sort of concave-down curve crosses zero.

The minimum wage will be like that. If you graphed the spending power of the minimum wage people (their income minus their expenses) it will probably be some kind of curve. Starting from zero, the graph will slope upwards, until you hit a peak, and then it will slope downwards as the increased labour cost exceeds the benefit of higher wages.

We are probably somewhere to the left of this optimal point. The increase LA is making probably will move people closer to the optimal point. Increasing the minimum wage to $100/hr will move you to a point far to the right of the point at which the first derivative of the graph crosses zero.

Comment: Re:Consumer Price Index (Score 1) 1091

by Alioth (#49734249) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

That assumes 100% of the cost of a product is labour costs.

In reality this is not true. In your example, the wage might go from $60/day to $120/day, but the product will go from $60 before to $80 after. Competition will mean many businesses take lower profits rather than pass on the entire price increase, and virtually no products are 100% labour cost. While wages cannot be raised infinitely, there will be an optimal point, and I suspect we are well below that optimal point as other cities have already demonstrated.

Comment: Re:Stupid reasoning. (Score 1) 1091

by Alioth (#49734233) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

Only if 100% of that product's cost is labour.

In reality this is rarely true, and competition means that businesses often can't pass on all of the cost increase - what it'll mean is businesses will make a little less profit, prices will increase by less than the increase in the minimum wage, and more people will have some sort of disposable income they can now spend on discretionary items. So sales increase.

Certainly you can't raise wages infinitely, and at some point you'll hit a peak, but I suspect we are a long way below that peak.

Logic doesn't apply to the real world. -- Marvin Minsky

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