Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: For the children! (Score 1) 764

by Opie812 (#48272841) Attached to: Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"
..yes, and there is one area (which you mention) in which he feels he can help so he is.

He can't be a positive role model to black kids because he's not black*. He can't be a role model to disabled kids because he's not disabled*. He's doing what he can to help in one specific usecase. His efforts should be appreciated by everybody.

*I acknowledge you shouldn't be excluded from being a role model if you don't share the same skin colour or able-bodiness. But if you share those attributes I presume it creates a closer connection.

Comment: Re:I keep warning you and you keep laughing... (Score 2) 231

by Red Flayer (#45330553) Attached to: How Elon Musk Approaches IT At Tesla

You're referencing a character who first appeared on the Simpsons in the 90s... before SAP software as a class even existed.

What? ERP systems have been around since the 70s... SAP released R/2 in '79. If you're talking about R/3 (when they introduced server-client architecture), it was released in 1992.

Comment: Re:Depends on the business (Score 1) 453

Today, you usually know who's calling before you answer. It may be appropriate to take a call if it's more important than the meeting. If you're in sales, a call from a major customer is probably more important than a meeting.

Sure, but not in the meeting. Excuse yourself, and explain it's an extremely important customer call that absolutely cannot wait.

And even if this is the case, you're still being rude... just with an excuse. The call may be more important to you, but the other people in the meeting? You're wasting their time.

If you've blocked out time for a meeting, don't take calls during that time. It's rude and unprofessional.

Note: This is for orgs that have effective meetings. If your meetings are generally unproductive, it may be a different story...

Comment: Is this a surprise? (Score 5, Interesting) 453

Part of the list of things I go over with my new hires is basic business etiquette. I spend at least an hour per employee on it. The most annoying thing I find is people who have a mother/father/significant other who expect them to always answer the cell phone when they call it. My experience is that a lot of people we hire have never worked in a professional atmosphere before... I'm not sure if this is because of our hiring practices, or is because of the general habits of today's younger workforce. If I am in a meeting I scheduled, and someone my rank or lower answers their phone, I almost always immediately end the meeting, to be rescheduled later. I run meetings so as to waste the minimum amount of time required for everyone; I expect the same from others. The public shaming seems to work well at my current workplace.

Comment: Re:And I blame my parents (Score 1) 734

by Opie812 (#45146995) Attached to: Facebook Comment Prompts Arrests In Cyberbullying Suicide Case
"Luckily, my parents granted me with the mental fortitude and tools to survive"

How did they do this? I have a toddler and want to prepare him for this kind of stuff. Any insight would be appreciated. When I was a kid, I was never bullied, nor a bully. I saw it going on, but didn't do anything to stop it.

Comment: Re:They could kepe (Score 2) 208

by Red Flayer (#44690717) Attached to: X.Org Foundation Loses 501(c)3 Non-Profit Status

Sure they are, but that doesn't stop 90% of people from filing on time, or at least filing for the automatic extension. For that matter, nearly every church in the country manages to do the same.

Actually, churches are an exception. Churches that have been granted 501(c)3 status as a church under 170(b)(1)(A)(i) are not required to file information returns with the IRS. They get special treatment.

I've got all the money I'll ever need if I die by 4 o'clock. -- Henny Youngman

Working...