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Submission + - Mouse cloned from drop of blood (bbc.co.uk)

Ogi_UnixNut writes: Scientists in Japan have succeeded in cloning a mouse from a drop blood. From the BBC: "Circulating blood cells collected from the tail of a donor mouse were used to produce the clone, a team at the Riken BioResource Center reports in the journal Biology of Reproduction."

The female mouse managed to live a normal lifespan and could reproduce, according to the researchers.

Submission + - Key test for Skylon spaceplane engine technology (bbc.co.uk) 1

Ogi_UnixNut writes: "The Skylon spaceplane is an ambitious project to develop a single-stage-to-orbit craft that can take off and land like a normal airplane.
Part of this project requires an engine that can work both as a rocket engine and a normal air-breathing engine (a hybrid approach essentially).
This would reduce the amount of oxidizer required to send stuff into space, and could greatly reduce the cost of sending things into space.
Now, some key experimental parts of the engine have been built, and are to be tested in public at the Farnborough Air Show in the UK in July.

For more information, as well an overview of the engine and Skylon project, check out the BBC link."


Submission + - 3D-nanoprinting speed record set by Vienna University (bbc.co.uk)

Ogi_UnixNut writes: "A new world speed record for the fastest 3D-printed nano-objects has been claimed by researchers in Austria. The team was able to create sculptures as small as a grain of sand in a fraction of the time than had previously been required, and to demonstrate this process the group created a model of a Formula 1 racing car 0.285mm (0.011in) in length in just over four minutes.

The process itself (two-photon lithography) is well known to the science community, but until now it has been too slow, typically taking days to weeks to generate large 3D structures. This technology offers the prospect of 500x to 1000x speed improvement, and the team are researching applications in 3D printing of bio-compatible matter for use in the medical industry."

Wireless Networking

Submission + - 'Twisted' waves could boost capacity of wireless spectrum (bbc.co.uk)

Ogi_UnixNut writes: In Venice, Italy, Physicist's have shown that it is possible to use two beams of incoherent radio waves, transmitted on the same frequency but encoded in two different orbital angular momentum states, to simultaneously transmit two independent radio channels.

In principle this allows the implementation of an infinite number of channels in a given, fixed bandwidth, even without using polarization, multiport or dense coding techniques.

Potentially a boon for congested spectrum problems, although at the moment I suspect it would only work for directional links.

Anything cut to length will be too short.