Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Internet

FCC Confirms Delay of New Net Neutrality Rules Until 2015 127

Posted by Soulskill
from the for-extra-lame-duckiness dept.
blottsie writes: The Federal Communications Commission will abandon its earlier promise to make a decision on new net neutrality rules this year. Instead, FCC Press Secretary Kim Hart said, "there will not be a vote on open internet rules on the December meeting agenda. That would mean rules would now be finalized in 2015." The FCC's confirmation of the delay came just as President Barack Obama launched a campaign to persuade the agency to reclassify broadband Internet service as a public utility. Opensource.com is also running an interview with a legal advisor at the FCC. He says, "There will be a burden on providers. The question is, 'Is that burden justified?' And I think our answer is 'Yes.'"

Comment: Re:It's stupid - switch to GMT (Score 1) 613

by Nos. (#48290725) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Do You Stand on Daylight Saving Time?

This is exactly what the world should do.
When I schedule a meeting, I just pick the time and date and everyone knows instantly when that is, it doesn't matter what time of year it is, and when [Country X] has arbitrarily decided to change times this year.

I moved from Saskatchewan (who doesn't change times) to BC and I'm not looking forward to it. Sure I'll get an extra hours of sleep this weekend, but I lose it a few months later.

The sad thing is, the number of people in SK who want to change times, or worse yet, think that province should switch to MST. For those who don't know, Saskatchewan falls completely within CST. It generally becomes an argument about this time every year.

Comment: Re:Beyond the law? (Score 1, Flamebait) 354

by Nos. (#47998659) Attached to: FBI Chief: Apple, Google Phone Encryption Perilous

He's saying that if you're accused of a crime, and a judge issues a court order to allow authorities to look at your phone (or other device), they have the legal right to. However, if that device is encrypted and the vendor has no way of decrypting it, it's up to you, the accused to provide the decryption key. By "forgetting" the key, you're placing yourself beyond the law.

Comment: Re:Can't live with/without them... (Score 1) 353

by PhotoJim (#47416551) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

Of course our plan is imperfect. It's just less imperfect than yours is.

Choice is great, and normally I'm a big fan of choice, but when Canadians live about 2-3 years longer than Americans, on average, and spend a little more than 50% of what Americans spend on health care, I view our compromises as being acceptable. I like the economic freedom that detaching health insurance from employment provides. The two times in my life I have had pressing issues, I received immediate care. And frankly, it would be best if the US remained a private health care nation because, if I prefer care faster than my province's system provides it, I can hop across the border for it. I don't expect to have that need, but I still have that choice.

No one is uninsured here, and that means no one consumes health care and free rides on those that can afford to pay (or choose to pay), and even those of modest means will get quality care. Preexisting conditions are a non-issue. To me, those advantages outweigh the loss of choice. (And to be truthful, I do have choice - Canada has 13 systems here, one for every province and territory, so if I don't like the health care where I live, I can hop to another province. That's adequate for me.)

Comment: Re:Can't live with/without them... (Score 1) 353

by PhotoJim (#47409571) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies

This is why you need a single payer system. My premiums don't go up because I ate too many ice cream cones, because I don't pay premiums per se. I pay taxes and my taxes pay for medical treatment for anyone who lives in my jurisdiction.

The solution to your problems, perversely to sycodon's preferences, is *more* government, oddly enough, not less.

Comment: Re:Non-story. (Score 1) 346

by Nos. (#47375677) Attached to: Goldman Sachs Demands Google Unsend One of Its E-mails

First, nowhere does it say they were using SMTP, at least not that I saw. They are likely using SMTP with TLS.

Secondly, they had intended on sending that document within their own domain, which likely means it wouldn't have left the control of GS anyways. I'm not saying this is the best way to do things, but it's not necessarily insecure.

Comment: DVD still have use. (Score 4, Insightful) 339

by PhotoJim (#47122451) Attached to: The Energy Saved By Ditching DVDs Could Power 200,000 Homes

I still buy physical DVDs - primarily because they are passively archival and don't depend on me a) having connectivity or b) having my server nearby. I view programming at some locations (like my cottage) where it's easier to bring a few DVDs than it is to copy a bunch of data onto a hard disk and then connect a computer to the television.

I also wonder if the energy consumption considers the issues of ramped-up Internet infrastructure and server capacity required to store, back up and stream the content. This isn't free and isn't emission-neutral. High-def (e.g. Blu-Ray) content is even moreso whereas the cost of a Blu-Ray disc versus DVD is actually almost trivial. Once you own the Blu-Ray player, you're done except for the marginal two or three dollar cost for the higher definition media.

To restore a sense of reality, I think Walt Disney should have a Hardluckland. -- Jack Paar

Working...