Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale Extended! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 20% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY20". ×

Submission + - Global warming pause no longer valid - US Scientiests ( 1

Taco Cowboy writes:

The whole Global Warming debate is as confusing as ever

Researchers from the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) say that there was no 'pause' in Global Warming

Dr Thomas Karl of NOAA point out that the warming rate over the past 15 years is "virtually identical" to the last century and updated observations show temperatures did not plateau

The idea of a global warming "hiatus" arose from questions over why the trend of warming temperatures appeared to be stalling recently compared to the later part of the 20th Century

The new analysis corrects for ocean observations made using different methods as well as including new data on surface temperatures

However Dr Peter Stott of the Met Office Hadley Centre said the results "still show the warming trend over the past 15 years has been slower than previous 15 year periods" and "global temperatures have not increased smoothly"

"This means natural variability in the climate system or other external factors has still had an influence and it's important we continue research to fully understand all the processes at work," he said

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), global average temperatures have increased by around 0.05C per decade in the period between 1998 and 2012


This compares with an average of 0.12 per decade between 1951 and 2012

On the other hand, the new analysis suggests a figure of 0.116 per decade for 2000-2014, compared with 0.113 for 1950-1999

Submission + - Edward Snowden: The World Says No to Surveillance (

An anonymous reader writes: Two years after his wistle-blowing, Edward Snowden finds that his action had profound effects on political decision making and on citizen's understanding of privacy issues.

Submission + - French hosting providers stand against Intelligence Law Black Box project (

nbs-system writes: French hosting providers stand united against the Black Box project. That is why we wrote an open letter to the French government asking its members to reconsider.

The “Black Box” project proposed by the French government goes, by some aspects, further than what was reproached to the US with the Patriot Act. This measure allowing the tapping, at any moment, of all the traffic of a hosting provider or an Internet service provider in the purpose of looking for potential terrorists seems relatively vain, very poorly targeted and economically counter-productive.

All this, beyond being useless in terms of results, seems to be a very bad direction to move in, regarding the confidentiality to which no one will ever be entitled to again, as well as for the fact that it will kill a part of French economy, one of the only ones still growing.

That is why we ask the French government to reconsider.


Submission + - Kim Dotcom's Mega Fileshare Service Riddled With Security Holes (

twoheadedboy writes: "Kim Dotcom launched his new project Mega on Sunday, claiming it was to be "the privacy company". But it might not be so private after all, as security professionals have ripped it to shreds. There are numerous problems with how encryption is handled, an XSS flaw and users can't change their passwords, they say. But there are suspicions Mega is handing out encryption keys to users and touting strong security to cover its own back. After all, if Kim Dotcom and Co don't know what goes on the site, they might not be liable for copyright prosecutions, as they were for Megaupload, Mega's preprocessor."

Submission + - Mozilla Launches Firefox OS Developer Phone (

sfcrazy writes: Three major players are battling for a spot in the highly competitive smartphone market with their open source operating systems — Jolla, Mozilla and Canonical. While Jolla has some deals to bring their devices to the market, Mozilla has a lead here. Stormy Peters of Mozilla Foundations announced that the foundation is working with Geeksphone to bring the developer phone running Firefox OS to the market. These developer phones are being developed by Geeksphone in partnership with Telefonica and Geeksphone.
The phone has appealing specs:

CPU Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 1Ghz
UMTS 2100/1900/900 (3G HSPA)
GSM 850/900/1800/1900 (2G EDGE)
Screen 3.5 HVGA Multitouch
3 MP Camera
MicroSD, Wifi N, Light and proxmity Sensor, G-Sensor, GPS, MicroUSB
1580 mAh battery
Over the air updates
Unlocked, add your own SIM card

The Internet

Submission + - UK ISPs Respond to the Dangers of Using Carrier Grade NAT Instead of IPv6 (

Mark.JUK writes: "Several major Internet Service Providers in the United Kingdom, including BSkyB, Virgin Media, TalkTalk, AAISP and Fluidata, have warned that the adoption of Carrier Grade NAT (IPv4 address sharing) is likely to become increasingly common in the future. But the technology, which many view as a delaying tactic until IPv6 becomes more common place, is not without its problems and could cause a number of popular services to fail (e.g. XBox Live, PlayStation Network, FTP hosting etc.). The prospect of a new style of two tier internet could be just around the corner."

Submission + - NASA team pushing towards thermal nuclear propulsion systems (

cylonlover writes: Nuclear-powered rocket engines are not new. In the 1960s, both the U.S. and the Soviet Union developed and tested thermal nuclear rockets fitted with flight-worthy components. However, Project Rover and NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Nuclear Rocket Application) programs were defunded in the early 1970s just before test flights were to start. Now, as part of the Advanced Exploration Systems program at NASA, the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage team is tackling a three-year project to demonstrate the viability of and to evaluate materials for thermal nuclear propulsion systems for use in future deep space missions.

Submission + - FBI documents offers new insight into the death of the old Atari Corporation (

AtariDatacenter writes: "Newly released evidence suggest that Atari Corporation's decline (ending in 1996) may have been greatly influenced by two factors. Atari's investment in Federated Department Stores was a major financial disaster that was far worse than the public was aware of at the time. The depth of the injury by Federated was partially concealed by a DRAM import and resale operation which was determined by the FBI to be an illegal operation. Federated had financially crippled Atari. Both Federated and the DRAM resale operation kept management distracted. Atari limped along, but never recovered."

Submission + - Scientists Fire the World's Most Powerful Laser (

Diggester writes: Hidden away at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility is a terrifying 10-story laser. Recently scientists have finally started using it in anger, and now they've even smashed previous records to fire the most powerful laser shot ever recorded.

Submission + - The camera that can see through frosted glass, and around corners (

MrSeb writes: "Scientists in Israel have created a camera that can see around corners, or through solid objects such as frosted glass, and skin. The most exciting facet of this innovation is that the camera uses natural light to perform the imaging — such as a lamp, or the Sun — and not lasers or X-rays. Ori Katz, Eran Small, and Yaron Silberberg of the Weizmann Institute have shown that they can accurately resolve an object that’s hiding behind nearly opaque obstacles, or around a corner (or in another room, as long as the door’s open). In both cases, the light is scattered by the obstacle (the frosted glass, the corner wall), creating what appears to be white noise — but their camera, using spatial light modulation, can take these speckles of noise and enhance them "1000-fold" (the scientists' words) to recreate the image with surprising accuracy. Back in March, MIT announced a similar innovation — but it uses a laboratory-sized setup involving a femtosecond laser and complex hardware to discern time-of-flight. The Israeli camera looks like it uses off-the-shelf parts — and the fact that it works with natural light rather than a laser is rather cool. Its primary use will be in medical imaging (it's hard to get a sharp image of inside the brain, or other organs), but wannabe superheroes might find the technology interesting as well."

Submission + - Great Britain to grant free access to publicly funded research within 2 years (

alfachino writes: The British government is preparing to reveal their plans to allow all publicly funded scientific research to be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Although this is the right step in the right direction, there is some criticism as to how this transition should take place, who should pay for it, who benefits the most from it, and whether this will be a catalyst for other EU nations and the US to get their act together and head in the same direction. It seems like the Elsevier boycott may have had more effects after all.

Submission + - Jolla Mobile Sign MeeGo Smartphone Sales Agreement in China (

DavidGilbert99 writes: "Meego has been given a life line by former Nokia employees at Jolla Mobile and the startup has now signed a major deal with China's biggest mobile retailer, D.Phone, to sell whatever handsets it produces. Jolla says it will have its first MeeGo phone on the market by the end of 2012 though it's not clear yet where it will be on sale."

Submission + - 450mm plus EUV: has Moore's Law met its Waterloo? ( 1

ericjones12398 writes: "Intel cemented the future of 450-millimeter wafer technology with a recent $4.1 billion investment in ASML, a leading provider of lithography machines for the semiconductor industry. The move helps share the cost of developing bigger silicon wafers that yield more chips. ASML was seeking equity partners to not only migrate from the current 300mm wafer standard, but also finance research for Extreme Ultraviolet technology, or EUV lithography. Intel aims to secure a 450mm prototype by 2015 and push next generation silicon hard enough to shake TSMC and GlobalFoundaries, its remaining rivals in the ever-expensive game of chip manufacturing."

"Everybody is talking about the weather but nobody does anything about it." -- Mark Twain