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Biotech

+ - Genetic Savings & Clone Closes

Submitted by
robotsrule
robotsrule writes "This article discusses the closing of Genetic Savings & Clone, the pet cloning company started by billionaire John Sperling, a University of Phoenix founder. They are closing after successfully selling only two cloned pets, one of them a cat cloned and subsequently sold for $50,000 to a grief stricken Texas woman who lost her cat Little Nicky. The company was the subject of heated debate for animal activists. According to the article the company may have had to close up shop because:

"The venture probably failed because reproductive cycles of pets are too unpredictable for consistent and inexpensive cloning, said Bonnie Beaver, a Texas A&M professor and past president of the American Veterinary Medical Association.""
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Survey looks stuffed: 84% of IT pros work T-Day?

Submitted by
netbuzz
netbuzz writes "There should be plenty of IT folks reading Slashdot from their work PCs tomorrow, at least if a survey of 500 business workers is to be believed. Fully 84% of IT pros reported they will work all or part of Thanksgiving. More interesting — and perhaps more in line with reality — is the number who say they will use having to "work" to their advantage.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/9338 "
Media (Apple)

+ - Ctrl-Z: Justin Long denies he's no longer "A

Submitted by
david.emery
david.emery writes "In a report on his website, http://www.justinlong.net/ , Justin Long denies rumors that he has been removed as "the Mac" in the Apple "I'm a Mac/I'm a PC" ads.

From the posting (somewhere in the middle of the latest blog freetext): "as for the mac commercials, i don't know where that report came from that said i wasn't going to do anymore — i literally setting my alarm right now to wake up for a mac shoot tomorrow — if i'm not doing anymore i guess i can sleep in on my day off"

I guess we'll have to wait for the next series of ads to see who shows up."
Slashdot.org

+ - Happy Sweet 16 WWW!

Submitted by
GuNgA-DiN
GuNgA-DiN writes "Today marks the 16th anniversay of the World Wide Web. According to the timeline on the W3.org site: "the first web page [was] http://nxoc01.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.htm l. Unfortunately CERN no longer supports the historical site. Note from this era too, the least recently modified web page we know of, last changed Tue, 13 Nov 1990 15:17:00 GMT (though the URI changed.)" A lot has changed in 16 years and this little "baby" has grown into full-blown teenager."
Communications

+ - Guide to International Airport Wi-Fi

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Several months ago, TravelPost.com published its Guide to U.S. Airport Wi-Fi. The site got a ton of feedback about the guide, and it led us to put together a similar resource for airports outside the U.S. We chose 80 major international airports and have collected information about wi-fi services, fees and hotspot locations. Thought Slashdot readers would want to know about the guide for their future travels... TravelPost.com's Guide to International Airport Wi-Fi"
Nintendo

+ - Wii Revision Features DVD Playback

Submitted by
Dennis
Dennis writes "European fansite Wii-x2 is reporting that the company called Sonic Solutions revealed that a future version of Nintendo's Wii console will feature DVD-movie playback feature. Nintendo plans to release this version of Wii in the latter half of 2007."
Windows

+ - Windows Vista already leaked

Submitted by
Rytis
Rytis writes "Though just only a couple of days have passed since Microsoft released the long awaited Vista to manufacturing, Information Week now reports that Windows Vista final version, along with the Office 2007 final code, are already available on P2P networks, including BitTorrent. It seems that the promised tough anti-piracy policy is about to stand its first challenge. Although valid product registration keys are not available yet, pirates feel confident that Vista will be cracked shortly."
Software

+ - Interview with Spreadsheet Creator

Submitted by Gammu
Gammu (1004474) writes "Dan Bricklin helped create one of the most successful computer metaphors of all time, and he never got rich. He, and another engineer, created Personal Software to create the computer spreadsheet VisiCalc, which established the Apple II as the standard microcomputer for small businesses and attracted the attention of IBM to the market. Josh Coventry recently interviewed Bricklin about VisiCalc and his newer projects, including a Wiki-style spreadsheet."
Enlightenment

+ - Do we need to become "Carbon-Neutral?"

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "I've heard the news stories and read the websites and seen the movies — even PM Tony Blair came out saying something must be done without further delay. Am I correct in assuming that we, as a society and as individual consumers, must become carbon-neutral in order to avoid certain environmental catastrophes? Would something as simple as an indoor garden or other device need to be invented, that would act as a carbon sink, help consumers eliminate their carbon deficit with the planet? How can technology, or specifically the online community, help ensure there's a great planet to pass on to our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren?"
Education

+ - What Math Courses Should We Teach CS Students?

Submitted by
Coryoth
Coryoth writes "If you're taking computer science then getting as much mathematics as you can is probably a good idea. Ultimately, however, there are only so many math courses you an squeeze in. Given that, what areas of mathematics should we be teaching CS students for maximum benefit? Traditionally university math courses are structured around the needs of the physical sciences and engineering, which means calculus is what gets offered. While a decent calculus course can teach a certain amount of formality in reasoning, wouldn't CS students be better served with a course in mathematical logic and foundations with its greater degree of formal reasoning and obvious connections to fundamental concepts in computer science? Are courses in abstract algebra and graph theory going to be useful to CS students? Should courses in category theory (yes, it applies to computer science) be required of students going on in theoretical computer science? In short — what areas of mathematics are going to be the most useful and most applicable to computer science students? What courses were of the most value to you?"

You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing viability of FORTRAN. -- Alan Perlis

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