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Comment: Keep your stuff in a Tent (Score 1) 129

We should be moving toward keeping all our 'stuff' in a distributed individual server which we personally control, but services can access via standard API.

There is a new project toward building this interoperable API - tent.io . It is just getting started, but deserves community support.

Comment: We must control our own data, separate services (Score 1) 82

by Nohea (#43811053) Attached to: Twitter's New Money-Making Plan: Lead Generation

Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Flickr should be services which use personal data controlled by their own users. If we controlled our own tweets, posts, pictures, and connected them to our friends via interoperable services, then once service providers pull a fast one, we could pull up stakes and go to the next one.

Look into the prototypical Tent project https://tent.io/ for a vision of the future.

Comment: 3 things made Facebook a success... (Score 1) 295

by Nohea (#32187774) Attached to: Creating a Better Facebook

1. "Safe" place to be and share. Obviously, they threw this out the window.
2. Best "Dashboard". The superior, clean interface to see updates made a lot of users abandon MySpace, etc. This will be a big hurdle for the aspiring replacement- ease of use and cleanness.
3. Critical-mass of user network. It has the people/friends you want. This hurdle can be overcome too, as long as the "open" movement doesn't fracture into a thousand sourceforge projects.

Honestly, we've got to support this effort, and i hope all us paranoid hackers can get on the bus in the same direction. We have so many great tools and infrastructure-- we just have to make it a no-brainer for grandpa and the tweens to use alike.

Social Networks

+ - Secure open social networking - Diaspora*->

Submitted by Nohea
Nohea (142708) writes "C'mon, you know a lot of us had this idea when Facebook when totally "evil" on privacy. Now a few NYU students are committing to building a secure GPL'ed, decentralized replacement. Of course, you may ask, "why them?". And it is vaporware. But it's got to be someone, and we may as well work together... think about it."
Link to Original Source
Image

Russian Officials To Investigate Regional President's Alien Abduction Claims 184

Posted by samzenpus
from the mars-wants-to-play-chess dept.
wdef writes "The BBC reports that a Russian MP has asked President Dmitry Medvedev to investigate claims by a regional president that he has met aliens on board a spaceship. Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the leader of the southern region of Kalymkia, made his claim in a television interview. Mr Ilyumzhinov said in an interview on primetime television that he had been taken on board an alien spaceship which had come to planet Earth to take samples — and claims to have several witnesses. He has been president of Kalmykia, a small Buddhist region of Russia which lies on the shores of the Caspian Sea, for 17 years. As president of the World Chess Federation, he has spent tens of millions of dollars turning the impoverished republic into a mecca for chess players — building an entire village to host international tournaments. MP Andre Lebedev is not just asking whether Mr Ilyumzhinov is fit to govern. He is also concerned that, if he was abducted, he may have revealed details about his job and state secrets."
Games

Game Endings Going Out of Style? 190

Posted by Soulskill
from the to-be-continued dept.
An article in the Guardian asks whether the focus of modern games has shifted away from having a clear-cut ending and toward indefinite entertainment instead. With the rise of achievements, frequent content updates and open-ended worlds, it seems like publishers and developers are doing everything they can to help this trend. Quoting: "Particularly before the advent of 'saving,' the completion of even a simple game could take huge amounts of patience, effort and time. The ending, like those last pages of a book, was a key reason why we started playing in the first place. Sure, multiplayer and arcade style games still had their place, but fond 8, 16 and 32-bit memories consist more of completion and satisfaction than particular levels or tricky moments. Over the past few years, however, the idea of a game as simply something to 'finish' has shifted somewhat. For starters, the availability of downloadable content means no story need ever end, as long as the makers think there's a paying audience. Also, the ubiquity of broadband means multiplayer gaming is now the standard, not the exception it once was. There is no real 'finish' to most MMORPGs."

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