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Comment: Re:Good ruling (Score 1) 144 144

No, it isn't a subtle distinction, it's a massive one. The police are trained to and it is their job to make these decisions correctly.

In all of the highly-publicized recent cases they did not is remarkable - in spite of many times that number of correct judgements by other officers - because they made poor judgements in egregious ways, escalated their behavior out-of-control, and in some cases, planted exculpatory evidence.

Comment: Re:Start with an erroneous world view ... (Score 2) 181 181

Oh, they probably haven't driven on city streets either. With America's crumbling infrastructure. city streets are pothole-ridden messes, with traffic-calming, school buses, bike lanes, and other interesting twists; and unpredictable traffic including cyclists darting between motorized vehicles. Not only is it unpredictable, but it changes day-to-day - with construction, schools being in or out of session, and any of the other obstacles that the city likes to throw in drivers' way.

The people who come up with this crap are those who will benefit from it financially if/when idiot-lawmakers allocate money to it. The real solution is funding planned infrastructure renewal and intelligent traffic planning and control. Butt that is hard, unsexy, actual work that requires real engineers - not political appointees and tenured "seniority" employees.

Comment: Re:HOWTO (Score 5, Informative) 1081 1081

You can expect anything you want, but it isn't happening. Here for example, is an innocent executed by Texas using a bogus "expert."

http://www.newyorker.com/magaz...

You've never heard of the "Innocence Project", I take it.

Vengeance by the state is certainly not the same as revenge, it is a severely broken system, fed by an electorate that is easily swayed by simplistic made-up origin stories (Fox News), prosecutors who want scalps for career advancement, and in love with militaristic nonsense; and a system which is disproportionately harsh on minorities.

Comment: Re:I thought (Score 1) 40 40

Well I happen to like Starbucks coffee, and so do many other people; but obviously you were trolling. Starbucks however, doesn't seem to think highly of selling coffee. I think there is honor in selling coffee (a little over the top there). But Starbucks wants to sell merchandise, breakfast sandwiches, and soon lunch sandwiches, and books. Mr. Schulz wrote two books, not sure why, they want to sell these books. Also peppermint mochas and frappuchinos.

As long as they keep a neat place with the heat going in December and lots of chairs, and the coffee (which as I mentioned, I like), it's OK to be there if you aren't a hipster, or own an i-device, and all that nonsense. You can even pay with your app or whatever if you want, I won't judge.

Comment: VW familywith VCDS (Score 1) 195 195

You can set many convenience features (and some drivetrain-related ones too, I believe) in VW-family cars. You buy a dongle and software (runs $200 and up) called VCDS (used to be VAG-COM) and connect the car to a PC or smartphone, and go to town. For example, if your car doesn't already have it, you can install a rain-light sensor, and then tell the car to roll up windows and the sunroof when it rains.

Comment: Re:Pretty obvious (Score 2, Insightful) 115 115

Thing is, red light cameras catch people who are entering an intersection on red, which is illegal, dangerous, and inconsiderate (me-first-fuck-you'ers). You can argue about whether the amber/yellow should be 3 seconds or 4, and whether it was reduced in order to increase the revenue; but the minimum (federally mandated, I believe) is 3 s, and 3 s is plenty of time to stop or to go through based on conditions. RLC tickets in Chicago have a human review them, so they're not sent if conditions make it impossible to not go through (again you can argue over this).

But in the majority of situations (I'd guesstimate 99%), and RLC catches a person doing something illegal. There is no question of balancing rights and improvement in traffic conditions.

The Almighty Buck

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Buys the LA Clippers For $2 Billion 270 270

DroidJason1 (3589319) writes "Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has purchased the LA Clippers for a whopping $2 billion, also setting a new record price for an NBA team. This deal is apparently tentative until Donald Sterling gives his blessing. Twenty-nine other NBA owners need to offer their approval as well, but that shouldn't be a problem as long as Ballmer reaffirms his commitment of keeping the Clippers in Los Angeles. Interestingly, Donald Sterling had purchased the team back in June of 1981 for $12.5 million." We talked about this earlier in the week when rumors of the purchase started circulating.

Comment: Re:Hurray for Japan (Score 4, Informative) 274 274

By your own premise, once you "snap your fingers and make all the guns go away in America," then the people suffering from "problems of undertreatment of the mentally ill, mistreatment of the poor, and the prevailing attitude that I'm not responsible for my own actions" will not be able to shoot anyone. Thus the murder rate would go down (since you imply it is because of these problems, and not the availability of guns, that people shoot people).

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