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Comment: Driving and talking simultaneously (Score 1) 418

by NeveRBorN (#44518187) Attached to: Talking On the Phone While Driving Not So Dangerous After All

I read through quite a few comments on this one, and I thought about replying to just one. That wouldn't have been fair.First let me say, I'd be willing to wager that some people can talk on the cell phone at the same time as they drive more safely than they can drive without while others cannot.

Let's take a look at something most of you seem to know more about than science, sports (pun intended). Athletes practice many hours a day. The purpose of practicing isn't really to get to a point where one can constantly make conscious decisions to win whatever game they are playing. The purpose of practice is to build strength, and train the brain to make unconscious decisions the way they need to be made to reduce reaction time. Call it muscle memory or whatever you want. Some people learn to react unconsciously on the road.

With that said, this is only a theory. However, seeing that so many of you feel the need to refute an actual study if anecdotal evidence, I'll tell you this: Don't bother trying to convince me otherwise unless you're willing to get off your lazy ass and perform an actual scientific study that proves me wrong.

Comment: Not just AT&T (Score 1) 380

I can say for sure that it's not just AT&T. A couple of weeks ago, I was receiving alerts every 15 minutes for floods that were happening 400 miles away on the east coast. Add to the this the fact that I couldn't stop the annoying screeching my phone was making without unlocking my phone and confirming the message and you had one hell of a case of distracted driving and nearly two accidents. I'd much rather text while driving 100% of the time. It isn't 1/10th as distracting, and less than 1/100th as infuriating. Perhaps those who thought these messages were a good idea need to rethink their sanity.

Operating Systems

Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' Release Candidate Is Out 134

Posted by Soulskill
from the onward-and-upward dept.
New submitter Anand Radhakrishnan writes "The release candidate for the much-anticipated Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' is available for user testing. Its many new features include Cinnamon Control center, an improved login manager with HTML 5 support, a driver manager, and a lot of under-the-hood improvements. 'A new tool called MintSources, aka "Software Sources," was developed from scratch with derivative distributions in mind (primarily Linux Mint, but also LMDE, Netrunner and Snow Linux). It replaces software-properties-gtk and is perfectly adapted to managing software sources in Linux Mint. From the main screen you can easily enable or disable optional components and gain access to backports, unstable packages and source code.' This release with Cinnamon looks really tempting."

Comment: Are they really missing the mark? (Score 1) 344

by NeveRBorN (#43278969) Attached to: The ATF Not Concerned About 3D Printed Guns... Yet

Where ATF is missing the mark is that these printed guns are already good enough for the planned murder or bank hold up, hijacking, etc, where getting off one or two rounds is all the perp is interested in.

Or did their response mistakenly give us more information than they intended. From their response I'm led to believe that their primary concern isn't included in your list. I might be wrong, but I think they're at last smart enough to realize that untraceable, printed guns would be more likely to be used in these cases. So what does that tell us about their focus?

Comment: COPPA is ridiculous in the first place. (Score 3, Interesting) 134

by NeveRBorN (#43220999) Attached to: Stricter COPPA Laws Coming In July

As the father of a daughter who will be 13 in less than a week, I can say that COPPA was ridiculous in the first place. Like so many laws and regulations in place today, it provides nothing but the illusion of security. To those who believe it accomplished something... Sorry, but you've been had. Your kids likely have every account imaginable and because you're so naive you don't have a clue. Not only that, but because of the restrictions, your kids have been missing out on really good opportunities that they otherwise may have had.

Sadly because of COPPA, we haven't seen many services developed geared towards kids. Our children are likely missing out on huge educational opportunities simply due to the fact that providing internet services to them is such a pain in the ass. Frankly, it pisses me off because in my opinion, the government should have no say over what I allow my daughter to share online. Policing her is my job as her father, not yours. Knowing what I need to know to do so is also my problem. If I were to choose not to, that would be my own problem.

Comment: Documentation Vs. Specific Examples (Score 1) 418

In my experience, the answers on Stack Overflow are examples of a particular usage, instead of documentation of the usage of a particular function or class. The MSDN documentation serves it's purpose when you specifically need to know how something works, but Stack Overflow functions much better when you need to know what to use to accomplish a specific task.

What would you expect Microsoft do? Preconceive every possible use of the .Net framework, and create examples for everything? Of course not, and this is why the crowd sourced approach works so well for this instead. It must be far more efficient to pool mental power when it is needed, and answer specific questions with example.

The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent. -- Sagan

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